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Armstrong 
State College 



1 994-95 Catalog 




Accreditation: Armstrong State College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of 
the Southern Assoc Lation of Colleges and Schools to award associate, baccalaureate, 
masters, and educational spe< Lalists degrees. 



Academic Calendar 

Fall. 1994 Winter, 1995 Spring, 1995 

Session A 

(11 weeks) (11 weeks) (11 weeks) (4 weeks) 



Summer. 1995 
Session B Session C Session D 

(4 weeks) (8 weeks) (6 weeks) 



Freshman Applications Due 


Aug. 15 


Dec. 5 


Feb. 20 


June 1 


June 18 


June 1 


Junel 


New Student Document Deadline 


Sept. 5 


Dec. 19 


March 13 










Registration 


Sept. 20-21 


Jan. 4 


March 29 


June 20 


July 18 


June 20 


June 20 


First Day of Class 


Sept. 22 


Jan. 5 


March 30 


June 21 


July 19 


June 21 


June 21 


Mid-Term 


Oct. 26 


Feb. 9 


May 3 


July 6 


July 31 


July 19 


July 13 


Last Day to Withdraw Without Automatic Penalty 


Oct. 26 


Feb. 9 


May 3 


July 6 


July 31 


July 19 


July 13 


Advisement & Advance Registration 


Nov. 7-11 


Feb. 13-17 


May 15-19 


July 24-28 




July 24-28 


July 24-28 


Last Day to Withdraw 


Nov. 30 


March 13 


June 5 


July 11 


Aug. 7 


Aug. 9 


July 31 


Last Day of Class 


Dec. 5 


March 16 


June 8 


July 17 


Aug. 11 


Aug. 15 


Aug. 4 


Reading Day 


Dec. 6 


March 17 


June 9 










Final Examinations Begin 


Dec. 7 


March 20 


June 12 


July 18 


Aug. 14 


Aug. 16 


Aug. 7 


Final Examinations End 


Dec. 9 


March 22 


June 14 


July 18 


Aug. 14 


Aug. 17 


Aug. 7 


Graduation 


Dec. 1 1 




June 16 










Holiday 


Nov. 24-25 


Jan. 16 


May 29 


July 4 




July 4 


July 4 


ISAT Application Deadline 

Institutional Scholastic Aptitude Test (ISAT) 


July 8 
Aug. 13 


Sept. 30 
Nov. 5 


Jan. 13 
Feb. 18 


April 7 
May 13 








Collegiate Placement Exam (CPE) 


Contact Admissions Office. 927-5277 










College Level Examination Program (CLEP) 


Oct. 13 


Jan. 26 


April 20 


June 29 


Aug. 24 






Regents' Test Application Deadline 
Regents' Test Administration 


Oct. 4 
Oct. 24-25 


Jan. 24 
Feb. 13-14 


April 18 
May 8-9 


July 5 
July 23-24 








CHAOS Orientation Sessions (Summer, 1993) 


Contact Division of Student Affairs. 927-5271 









■ All dates subject to change 



1994 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 




APRIL 




MAY 




JUNE 


1 M T W T F 1 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M 


T W T F S 


S 


M T W T F 


s 


S M T W T F 1 


1 


12 3 4 5 


12 3 4 5 




1 2 


1 


2 3 4 5 6 


7 


12 3' 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


3 4 


5 6 7 8 9 


8 


9 10 11 12 13 


14 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


10 11 


12 13 14 15 16 


15 


16 17 18 19 20 


21 


12 13 14 15 16 17 11 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


17 18 


19 20 21 22 23 


22 


23 24 25 26 27 


28 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


27 28 


27 28 29 30 31 


24 25 


26 27 28 29 30 


29 


30 31 




26 27 28 29 30 


30 31 


















JULY 


AUGUST 


SEPTEMBER 




OCTOBER 




NOVEMBER 




DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M 


T W T F S 


S 


M T W T F 


S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 


12 3 4 5 6 


1 2 3 




1 




12 3 4 


5 


1 2 5 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


2 3 


4 5 6 7 8 


6 


7 8 9 10 11 


12 


4 5 6 7 8 9 1( 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


9 10 


11 12 13 14 15 


13 


14 15 16 17 18 


19 


11 12 13 14 15 16 1". 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


16 17 


18 19 20 21 22 


20 


21 22 23 24 25 


?6 


18 19 20 21 22 23 2' 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


23 29 30 31 


25 26 27 28 29 30 


23 24 


25 26 27 28 29 


71 


28 29 30 




25 26 27 28 29 30 3' 


31 






30 31 













1995 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


MAY 




JUNE 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F 


S 


S M T W T F 5 


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 


12 3 4 


12 3 4 


1 


12 3 4 5 


6 


1 2 : 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


7 8 9 10 11 12 


13 


4 5 6 7 8 9 11 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


14 15 16 17 18 19 


20 


11 12 13 14 15 16 1 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


21 22 23 24 25 26 


27 


18 19 20 21 22 23 2 


29 30 31 


26 27 28 


26 27 28 29 30 31 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 


28 29 30 31 




25 26 27 28 29 30 


JULY 


AUGUST 


SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 




DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F 


S 


S M T W T F ! 


1 


12 3 4 5 


1 2 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


1 2 3 


4 


1 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


5 6 7 8 9 10 


11 


3 4 5 6 7 8 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


12 13 14 15 16 17 


18 


10 11 12 13 14 15 1 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


19 20 21 22 23 24 


?s 


17 18 19 20 21 22 2 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


27 28 29 30 31 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


29 30 31 


26 27 28 29 30 




24 25 26 27 28 29 3 


30 31 












31 



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Introduction 4 

[lie College/Otj 9 

Student i ife 19 

\dmissionfl 2S 

Financial Information 43 

Academic Policies and Information SS 

C. radii a to Studies 75 

School ot Arts and Sciences 81 

School of Education 177 

School of Health Professions 207 

Special Programs 243 

Faculty/ Administration 255 

Index 272 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 




As president of Armstrong State College, I am asked that question 
often — and my answer invariably depends on what prompted the 
query. 



Yes, our academic programs are excellent. This fact shows best by 
how well our graduates do once they leave us. Today's world stresses 
job readiness and career preparation and we place significant emphasis 
on assuring our graduates that they can compete with the best in the 
current job market. Our 
graduates in fields such as health 
care and computer science 
generally have multiple job offers 
to consider. Health students 
consistently post passrates that 
exceed 95 percent on national 
licensing exams and elementary 
education graduates have earned 
100 percent passrates on the 
Georgia Teacher Certification 
Test for the past seven years. 
Strong science and liberal arts 
programs produce excellent 
candidates for graduate study, 
pre-professional programs and 
today's job market. 




ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Outstanding academic programs? 
Dedicated teaching faculty? 
Extensive student self-governance? 
Low student-faculty ratios? 
Close-knit, friendly atmosphere? 
A beautiful campus? 

Career-oriented educational preparation? 
Effective job placement programs? 



Is it our faculty? Many proudly say that they came to Armstrong 
because they love the stimulation of classroom teaching. We keep our 
class sizes small so students and faculty really gel to know one another. 
I like seeing students ^nd professors discussing today's lecture over a 

cup of coffee or spending time on a research project that has gone far 
beyond the classroom assignment. 

Then, too, I know that many students are very special. And we try to 
treat them in a special way. .Armstrong has a commitment to encourag- 
ing student involvement in campus-wide decisions. I here are not very 
many other schools that allow students to determine how to spend 
student activities fees and promote student representation on all 
campLis-wide standing committees. Leadership opportuni ties a re a \ ail- 
able to everyone who wants to develop these skills. 

In short, I do not think that any one aspect distinguishes Armstrong 
State College from any other campLis. The way all oi these distinguish- 
ing factors blend together is what makes Armstrong State College what 
it is — a college that cherishes its tradition of excellence while looking 
forward to meeting the challenges of the future. 

Robert A. Burnett 
President 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 





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Degree Programs * 

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ARTS: Art 

Arts 

Drama/Speech 

English 

English 
(Communications) 

English 
(with Teacher Certification) 

General Studies 

History 

History 
(with Teacher Certification) 

Music 

Music Education 

Political Science 

Political Science 
(Public Administration) 

Political Science 
(with Teacher Certification) 

Psychology 




• 






• 


SCIENCE: Biology 

Biology 
(with Teacher Certification) 

Chemistry 

Chemistry 
(with Teacher Certification) 

Computer Science 

Criminal Justice 

Criminal Justice (Corrections) 

Criminal Justice (Law Enforcement) 

Criminal Justice (Law Enforcement 
with Post Certification) 

Mathematical Sciences 

Mathematical Sciences 
(with Teacher Certification) 

Physical Sciences 


• 


• 






• 


EDUCATION: Art Education 

Behavior Disorders 

'Business Education 

Early Childhood Education 

Early Elementary Education 

English 

Health & Physical Education 

Learning Disabilities 

Mathematics 

Middle School Education 






• 


• 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Degree Programs > 


■ ill 1 




Science 








• 




Social Science Education 
(History) 






• 




6 

3 


Social Science Education 
(Political Science) 






• 


• 


Q 
Ul 


Social Science 
Special Education 
Speech Correction 
Speech Language Pathology 






• 


. 


HEALTH PROFESSIONS: 












Dental Hygiene 




• 






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Dental Hygiene Education 






• 




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Health Science 






• 


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Medical Technology 






• 




Hi 

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Nursing 




• 


• 


• 




Radiologic Technology 




• 








Respiratory Therapy 




• 






MINOR CONCENTRATIONS: 
(not listed elsewhere): 












Anthropology 














Botany 














Communications 














Economics 














Engineering Science 












• 


Film 

Foreign Language 

Historical Archaeology 












m 


Human Biology 












• ■ 


International Studies 












TT 


Legal Studies 
Library Media 












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Linguistics 
Mental Health 












# 


Military Science 












1 ■ 

• 


Organizational Psychology 
Philosophy 












r^ 


Physical Education 












S 


Physics 

Preservation Studies 
Public Administration 
Russian Studies 
Sociology 
Teacher Education 
Zoology 
















ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Get started in college on the right foot 

Students often use their college catalog solely as a reference book — to look up rules, 
regulations, and requirements. Yet merely browsing through its pages can yield a 
tremendous amount of information about Armstrong State College as your academic 
home. This catalog can help you plot the best course for your years at ASC. Take time 
to take a look. 

You'll learn such facts as: 

— Armstrong supports a broad-based, pre-professional program in a variety of areas like 
business, dentistry, forestry, medicine, pharmacy, physical therapy and veterinary 
medicine. 

— Engineering studies students have several options for completing much of their 
coursework at Armstrong before transferring to a regional school of engineering 

— A cooperative education program flourishes on campus 

— Evening and weekend classes offer flexible scheduling 

— Off-campus classes at corporate sites and in Southeast Georgia are available 

— A versatile schedule of non-credit, continuing education classes are offered each 
quarter. 

The many student services are also outlined. They range from career planning and 
job placement to personal counseling and academic assistance programs. 

More than 30 student organizations meet religious, Greek, professional, academic, 
and special interest needs. An active student governance program plans extensive 
student activities throughout the year. Intercollegiate and intramural sports offer 
enjoyment for spectators and participants alike. 

The current academic calendar is located on the inside front cover for your 
convenience in planning your year. A brief "Where to Write or Call" listing on the 
inside back cover may help you find the right place to get your questions answered 
quickly and accurately. The catalog is your guide to success on campus. Keep it handy 
and use it often. 

Admissions check list 

Applications cannot be considered until the college has received all required 
information. 

Freshman Students 

1. Applications for Armstrong State College (with $10 non-refundable application 
fee) 

2. Official high school transcript 

3. Official record of SAT or ACT scores (If you graduated more than five years ago, 
appropriate placement test scores may substitute in many instances.) 

4. Certificate of Immunization 

Transfer Students 

1 . Application for Armstrong State College (with $10 non-refundable application fee) 

2. Official college transcript from each institution attended (If less than 36 quarter or 24 
semester hours earned, submit high school transcript and SAT or ACT score also.) 

3. Certificate of Immunization. 



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10 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Statement of Purpose 

Armstrong State College, a senior college in the University System of Georgia, 
provides a range of strong academic programs and an environment for intellectual 
and cultural growth in the arts and sciences, education, and health disciplines. The 
College pursues its purpose by promoting the free exchange of ideas in a variety of 
undergraduate programs leading to degrees at the Associate and Baccalaureate levels. 
In affiliation with Georgia Southern University, graduate programs of regional 
significance are offered. Recognizing its regional educational responsibilities, the 
College offers baccalaureate programs at the Brunswick Center and courses on an 
as-needed basis throughout its service area. The College provides non-degree pro- 
grams and activities through the Coastal Georgia Center for Continuing Education. 

Instruction 

Through instruction, the College ensures that students read and write effectively, 
and, through a strong liberal arts core curriculum, promotes the acquisition of 
knowledge in humanities, mathematics, the natural sciences, and the social sciences. 
The College prepares students in the methods of scholarly inquiry, research, and 
problem solving, and, in the process, encourages student commitment to learning and 
to physical, emotional, and social development. Furthermore, the College helps 
students to identify goals and the means of achieving them, as well as to understand 
and to respect people from diverse backgrounds and cultures. Additionally, it broad- 
ens the base of educational opportunities for students through formal and informal 
arrangements with other colleges and universities. 

Faculty, Students, and Staff 

The College recruits and retains faculty who are able teachers, supportive of its 
academic purpose, and who are professional sources of knowledge and expertise. It 
seeks, recruits, and retains students whose interests, needs, and backgrounds are 
diverse and whose records indicate a likelihood of success. It strives to create a 
community of learners in which a sense of mutual trust and respect is evident. It 
encourages and supports an active intellectual, cultural, and social life on campus. In 
addition, the College recruits and retains a well-trained staff, sensitive to the needs of 
those it serves and committed to supporting its academic purpose. 

Administration 

The administration ensures equal opportunity and access to employment, admis- 
sions, and programs and services of the College without regard to age, sex, race, 
national origin, color, religion, or physical handicap. It encourages faculty research 
and development, and provides an environment which enables faculty members to 
participate in the search for knowledge. It secures and manages funds necessary to 
maintain the College's academic programs, library, and support services. Furthermore, 
the administration provides systems of campus governance which are responsive to 
the concerns of students, faculty, staff, and the Board of Regents. And finally, it acquires 
and maintains facilities and equipment necessary to support the College. 

Community Service 

A regional resource for information and expertise, the college is responsive to the 
unique educational and community service needs of its constituency. By combining 
efforts with the community, the college designs and conducts continuing education 
programs and offers a variety of cultural and athletic events. Moreover, it liberally 
shares its physical facilities and grounds for the betterment of the academic and 
cultural life of the communitv. 



PROGRAMS 11 



History of the College 

Armstrong s t.itr c ollege ■> senioi unit ol the i niversit) s \ •• 
founded in I935 as Armstrong [unioi C ollege, to help meet the need tor ^ ollege level 
educational opportunities in the com mum t\ I lu- v ollrgr, .is rstahlishrJ h\ •■ 
Mayoi and Udermeiv was housed in tlu- beautiful Armstrong home a gin to tlv 
from tin- famil) ol George I Armstrong Ovei tin- years the college occu| 
.ulJithMi.il buildings in tin- Forsyth Park and Montere) Squ 
Armstrong c ollege o( Savannah, it became a two-year unit ol the l niversit) 
I he Board ol Regents conferred four-year status on Armstrong in 1964 and the* ollege 
moved to its present 250 a< re site, a gift From the Mills B I ane Foundation, in 1 December 
ol 1965 Additional buildings joined the eight original structures as Armstrong added 
professiona] and graduate programs and tripled in size 

rhe Pine uk Center, including a 1,000 seat theatre auditorium, the Health 
Professions Building, a nev* apartment style residence complex, a Librar) wing, and 
an academic computing center are among more recent additions 

A r m s tr on g State College, offers over 75 academic programs and majors in the 
School of \its and Sciences, the School ol Health Professions, and tin- School oi 
Education. 

I he academic community includes approximately 5000 students and more than 200 
full-time faculty members. Armstrong State College was full) accredited as a senior 
institution by the Southern Association of Colleges ^nd Schools in December, 1968, with 
accreditation retroactive to January l, 1968, and was List ^accredited in December 1992 

Location 

Armstrong students find much to enjoy about living in the cosmopolitan dtj ol 

Sa\ annah, the major urban area (pop. 200,1)00) in coastal Georgia. I he college's 250 acre 

campus is located in a residential area of the city which promotes a feeling ot freedom 
,\ud security on campus. 

Savannah, Georgia's founding city, has all the historic and cultural variety pi a 
metropolitan city with the added advantage of the ocean at its back door. A temperate 
climate encourages outdoor actn 1 ties and recreation j ear round. Beach and rh er outings 
include sailing, boating, water skiing, sunning and beachcombing Colt, tennis, fishing 
and hunting are also popular. 

A resident symphony orchestra, dance and theatre groups, and visiting entertain- 
ment groups regularly perform at the Civic center. Special celebrations and other 
festivals are scheduled throughout the year. 

The historic past lives in harmony with today's progress m Savannah. As a Living 
laboratory tor history, Savannah is unsurpassed vet the Savannah port is one ol the 
busiest on the Atlantic coast. 

Community oriented leisure activities complement on-campUS happening \ 
growing NCAA intercollegiate athletic program, acth e intramuraN, concerts, plays >.mo\ 
special entertainment mean lots to o\o without leaving campus. 

Accreditation 

Armstrong State College has earned the following regional ^nd special pur: 
accreditations: 
Armstrong State College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern 

Association of Colleges and Schools to award associate ,\nd baccalaureate degrees. 
Associate Degree Nursing - be the National League tor Nursing tor the period 

1977-2001. 
Baccalaureate Degree Nursing - by the National 1 eague tor Nursing tor the period 

1985-1999. 
Computer Science - by the Computer Science Accreditation Commission. 



12 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Dental Hygiene - by the Commission on Dental Accreditation of the American Dental 
Association for the period 1985-1994. 

Medical Technology - by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation 
for the period 1985-1997. 

Music - by the National Association of Schools of Music for the period 1985-1994. 

Radiologic Technologies - by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accredi- 
tation for the period 1984-1997. 

Respiratory Therapy Department - by the Committee on Allied Health Education and 
Accreditation for the period 1983-1997. 

Teacher Education Programs - by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher 
Education for the period 1982-1997. 

Office of College Advancement 

The Office of College Advancement consists of three components: Alumni Affairs, 
Public Relations, and Development, which includes the Armstrong State College Foun- 
dation, Inc. The office works with graduates, friends, area businesses, corporations, 
foundations, and other supporters of Armstrong State College by providing a vehicle of 
communication and fundraising support. 

Alumni Affairs 

The Office of Alumni Affairs serves as a liaison between the Alumni Association, 
Armstrong State College, and graduates. The office maintains current alumni records, 
processes alumni membership dues, and circulates college and alumni information. 
Membership in the association is open to all graduates and former students. 

Organized in 1937, the Armstrong State College Alumni Association is comprised of 
graduates and former students of Armstrong Junior College and Armstrong State 
College. The association promotes interaction among alumni, students, faculty, staff, and 
friends of the college in order to strengthen the ties between the college and its 
supporters. 

Each year the Alumni Association recognizes persons who have made outstanding 
contributions to the college and the Alumni Association by presenting the Distinguished 
Alumni Award, the Outstanding Alumni Service Award, the Distinguished Citizen's 
Award, and the Outstanding Faculty Award. 

Public Relations 

The Office of Public Relations promotes Armstrong, its activities, students, and faculty 
through interaction with media representatives. The office is responsible for external 
publications and promotions related to the college, including Armstrong Magazine and 
the alumni newsletter. The Office of Public Relations serves as the liaison between the 
college and media representatives and reports media activities to the University System 
of Georgia public relations representatives. 

Development 

In support of Armstrong, alumni and friends can make donations of cash, securities, 
or other qualifying assets through the Armstrong State College Foundation, Inc. 

Donations are used to respond to challenges and opportunities for growth. The funds 
provide the college with support unavailable through state appropriations. Gifts are also 
used to assist students through scholarships and other financial assistance, support 
outstanding teachers through faculty development awards and professorships, sponsor 



PROGRAMS 13 



symposia and guest lecturers enhance library holdings and r.u il issist m 

special projects and programs Private support helps sustain Vm >tateColl< 

tradition or a< ademk ex< ellen< e 

I he Armstrong State ( ollege I oundaoon lm is .1 dire* 1 support organization and the 
legal entit) to receive guts foi tin- college 1 ontribunons to the foundation 
exempt charitable organization are entitled to .ill tax benefits authorized in lavs 

Two-Year Degree Programs 

l he follow ing tw j ear degrees are offered as preparation foi 1 in the 

liberaJ arts and professions or as terminal professional d< 
Associate of Arts 

Vssot iateol Applied S< ience in( riminaJ [ustice 
Associate ol Science in Dental Hygiene 
Associate ol Science in Nursing 
Associate ol n. ienc e in Radiologic I e< hnologies 
Associate ol s «. ience in Respirator} I herapy 

Four-Year Degree Programs 

Bachelor of Arts m the fields ol art, drama-speech, I nglish, history, musu . political 
science, and psychology 

Bachelor ol General Studies 

Bachelor ol I lealth Science. 

Bachelor ol Musk Education. 

Bachelor of Science in the fields of biology, chemistry, computer science, cnmin.il 
justice, mathematical sciences, and physical science - 

Bachelor of Science in Education with majors in 1 arly Elementary Education; Middle 
School Education; Secondary Education in the teaching fields of Biology, Business 
(cooperative arrangement with Sa\ annah State College), Chemistry, English, Mathemat- 
ics, History, Political Science, Social Science and K-12 programs m Art. Health and 
Physical Education, and Speech Correction 

Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene Education 

Bachelor ol Science in Medical Technology. 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing. 

I he College is authorized to otter Teacher Education programs, preparing students 
tor certification by the Georgia State I department of Education in the following areas: art, 
biology, business education, chemistry, early elementary education, English, history, 
library media, mathematics, middle school education, political science and social science. 

Pre-Professional Programs 

(One of the Four-Year Degree Programs Must Be Pursued) 

Armstrong State College offers courses appropriate for the first two years of baccalau- 
reate programs such as business, engineering, foresby, industrial management, pharmac) . 
physical therapy, physics, etc., not ottered among its degree programs, and it offers the 
pre-professionaJ study appropriate for dentistry, medicine, veterinary medicine, and 

other professional fields. 



14 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Regents Engineering Transfer Program 

Qualified students seeking a bachelor of engineering degree may begin their college 
studies at Armstrong State College through the Regents Engineering Transfer Program. 
Upon successful completion of the pre-engineering curriculum, students may transfer to the 
Georgia Institute of Technology to complete the degree requirements. It is expected that 
students in this program, like other Georgia Tech graduates, will normally require four to five 
and one-half years to complete the degree requirements, depending on their pre-college 
preparation, involvement in extra-curricular activities, and engineering major. 

Dual-Degree Programs 

Armstrong State College has dual-degree programs in engineering with the Georgia 
Institute of Technology, Auburn University, Clemson University, Mississippi State 
University, and the University of Florida. Upon completion of the first three years of 
academic work at Armstrong, the student may enroll for two subsequent years at one of 
the participating schools. Upon completing the requirements of the two cooperating 
schools, the student will receive a baccalaureate degree from Armstrong State College 
and a baccalaureate degree in the chosen field of engineering from the second school. 

Dual-degree programs in other fields are also available. At the Georgia Institute of 
Technology, candidates from Armstrong State College are eligible to seek any degree 
offered in the sciences, mathematics, and management, as well as engineering. The 
Head of the Department of Chemistry and Physics is the Armstrong Coordinator of 
these dual-degree programs and should be contacted for additional information. 

A dual-degree program in forestry and environmental management with Duke 
University is available. Students complete three years of academic work at Armstrong 
State College, then enroll for two subsequent years at Duke University. Students who 
successfully complete the program receive a B.S. in biology from Armstrong State 
College and a M.S. in either forestry or environmental management from Duke 
University. The Head of the Department of Biology should be contacted for additional 
information. 

Cooperative Education Program 

In the cooperative education program students typically alternate quarters between 
college and work. This program offers students valuable practical experience as well 
as financial assistance in the form of compensation from the firms that employ them. 

Cooperative opportunities are available to students in computer science, chemistry 
and engineering, but are not limited to these majors. 

Cooperative students must register for the appropriate Cooperative Education 
Program course for quarters in which they work. These courses carry no credit and 
there is no charge for registration. 

Students interested in applying for admission to the Cooperative Education program 
should contact the co-op coordinator or head of their major department. 

Evening and Weekend Courses 

To accommodate students who are employed during the day, all core curriculum 
courses and many upper-division courses are offered in the late afternoon and evening. 
At present, the following degree programs are available to students who attend classes 
exclusively in the evening: Associate in Arts, Associate in Criminal Justice, and baccalau- 
reate degree programs in Communications, Computer Science, Criminal Justice, English, 
History, Mathematics, Political Science, Psychology, and Public Administration. Al- 
though evening offerings are expanded each year, prospective students should be 
advised that it often takes a longer time to complete degree requirements by attending 
evening classes exclusively than it does by attending day classes or a combination of day 
and evening classes. 



PROGRAMS 15 



I In- college has recentl) initiated •> weekend progran urriculum 

>. ourses m such fields as composition histor) foreign I . u i . • litu .d >., ience .mil 

psychology rhc Office ol Nontraditional If.immr, ovcrsivs tin- coordination and 
development ol the evening and weekend programs 

Off-Campus and Distance Learning Courses 

[o meet particular local and regional needs, tin- coll< selected com 

various off ( ampus sites, including fhe< oastaK leorgiaCentei I ffinghamC ount) H 
S< hool < lulfstream Aerospace, l Iines> ille publi< s< hools, Memorial Medi< .il c enter, and 
Union Camp << orporation Although most of these courses are taught by i ult) 

at the off-campus site, some ma) be detn ered in means o( intera< th e tele* onf< 
originating from tin- main campus. 

The Brunswick Center 

I he Brunsvs ick C enter is a consortium composed ol Brunsvs ukc ollege, Armstrong 
State College in Savannah, and Georgia Southern l niversit) in Statesboro It was 
authorized by the Board ol Regents ol the l niversit) System of Georgia in Se p tember 
.\nd w as organized tor tho purpose oi establishing a resident e ( enter tor ba< i alau- 
reate degrees. However, all throe participating institutions teach courses which apply 
toward the degrees, and credit earned trom any of these colleges through the 
Brunswick Center is accepted as residence credit by Armstrong State C oik 

Degree Programs: 

I he Brunswick Center offers programs ot study leading to tour degrees from 
Armstrong State Colleg 
Bachelor of General Studies 

a broad-based general education degree with minor concentrations in business, 

history, political science, and psychology 
Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice 
Bachelor ot Science in Education 

with certification in early childhood education (K-4)or middle school education 
Bachelor oi science in Nursing 

Criteria for Admission: 

Anyone who lias completed an associate degree or its equivalent is eligible tor 
admission to Brunswick Center programs ^nd courses. Moreover, Brunswick College 
Students who have sophomore standing and meet certain requirements, including 
completion of all Core Curriculum English requirements and passing the Regents 
Test, may be admitted to Brunswick Center classes taught by the senior colli 

Anyone who already has a baccalaureate degree also ma\ be admitted as a 
nondegree student to take courses, particularly for teacher certification. 

Admission Procedures: 

Prospective students apply tor admission to Armstrong State College and must meet 
all admission requirements tor that college. The admission application process is handled 
through the Brunswick Center Office; the completed application c\nd all transcripts ot 
previous college work must be sent tor preliminary processing to the Brunswick Center, 

which will then send the documents to the ASC .Admissions Office. 

After Admission: 

Once admitted to Armstrong State College or either oi the other consortium institu- 
tions, students are allowed to take courses ottered through the Brunswick Center by all 
three institutions. The senior colleges accept all course work done through the Brunswick 
Center as residence credit. Upper level courses taken bv Brunswick College students will 
be applied toward their baccalaureate degrees. 



16 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



The Director of the Brunswick Center serves as the initial advisor for all students in the 
Center. He meets with each student to outline an overall program as well as to plan a 
schedule each quarter. 

Registration for the Brunswick Center is done through the Center office at the time of 
Brunswick College registration. Students are encouraged to preregister for the next 
quarter during the specified preregistration time each quarter. 

Graduation requirements in each degree are set by Armstrong State College. The 
respective department heads and the Registrar at ASC certify each candidate for graduation. 

All Brunswick Center students have full use of the Brunswick College Library and 
other support services of Brunswick College. 

Fees: 

There is a $10 processing fee which must accompany each application for admission 
to Armstrong State College. 

Tuition fees for both senior college courses and junior college courses are collected at 
the current rates set by the University System Board of Regents. Senior college students 
taking six or more quarter hours at Brunswick College also must pay student activity and 
athletic fees at this institution. Tuition fees are paid to Brunswick College. 

Financial Aid: 

Prospective students interested in seeking financial aid should make application for 
their aid through the Financial Aid Office of their home school. Financial aid application 
forms for Armstrong State College may be obtained from the Brunswick Center Office. 

Coastal Georgia Center for Continuing Education 

The Coastal Georgia Center for Continuing Education was established in 1979 to 
combine the resources of Armstrong State College's Community Services Division 
and Savannah State College's Extended Services Division. The Center operates a unified 
continuing education program dedicated to serving the people of Savannah, Chatham 
County, the State of Georgia and, for some programs, persons beyond those boundaries. 

A wide variety of programs is offered at Armstrong State College, Savannah State 
College, the Downtown Center and, when it is appropriate, at job sites, schools, commu- 
nity centers, and other locations in Savannah. Instructors are drawn from the faculties of 
both institutions, from qualified experts in the Savannah community, and from consult- 
ants throughout the region. 

On the Armstrong campus, the major communitv services/continuing education 
component of the college is the short-course /conference program. This unit administers 
non-degree courses, conferences, and seminars designed for area residents who do not 
wish to participate in the regular credit classes offered by the college. These activities vary 
widely - some are related to professional development, others reflect personal interests, 
while others are recreational in nature. The Registrar maintains permanent records of 
persons participating in activities that meet certain criteria. 

Public Service Center 

The Armstrong State College Public Service Center is dedicated to helping Savannah 
and Southeast Georgia identify and resolve complex urban and regional issues. City and 
county governments, state, regional, and local agencies, and non-profit groups comprise 
the broad spectrum of organizations that stand to benefit from the Center's applied 
research, service, training, and public information programs. 

The Public Service Center's mission is to inform local government and agency decision 
makers of options as they face complex urban and regional issues. An important aspect 
of this mission is to provide relevant and timely information to these leaders to facilitate 
the work of their organizations, thus enabling them to provide better service to their 
constituencies, clients, and customers. 



PROGRAMS 17 



I hePubli< Sen ice< entei s mission is to inform local 
makers o( options as the) face complex urban and regional 
oi this mission is to provide rele> ant and timely information to tl 
the work ol theii organizations thus enabling them to prcn id( 
constituencies clients and customers 

I he Publi< Service Centei achieves its objectives thj 
information dissemination In parti< ular the t entei s a< ti\ ities nn In 

condu< ting applied resean h and analysis o( local publi< and prh issues 

and problems; 

providing informed analysis and consultation on policj 

n'ons to local governments, private non-profit and publii 

supporting in-sen ice training to public and prh ate non profit organizatii 

engaging in program <.U-\ elopmenl and planning to impro\ e tin- delh er) of kx al 

And regional government servi 

collecting and disseminating a \ ariet) ol relevant information to Kk.i1 and n . 

sen ice deli\ er) groups. 

Regional Criminal Justice Training Center 

I he Ajrmstrong state c ollege Regional c riminaJ Justice I raining c enter is a regional 
training site for criminal justice employees, especially those in law enforcement, [he 
region consists of nineteen counties; however, training is made a\ ailable to all criminal 
justice employees throughout the State of Georgia. I he basic mission ol the c enter is to 
provide certification classes for law enforcement And jail officers. In addition, there are 
numerous advanced and specialized courses tor higher certification credits I he training 
center has seven full-time Staff members and a large part-time instructor cadre 

Armstrong State/Savannah State Cross Enrollment Program 

A student enrolled at Savannah State College or at Armstrong State C ollege taking \ I 
LEAST 10 QUARTER HOURS at one institution has the prh liege of taking ONI CCX RSI 
at the other college without paying an additional fee. A student usually would take two 

courses at the home college paying full tees And one course at the other college which would 
be transferred back to the home college; or a student with at least a B" AVI RA( .1 (3.0) the 
preceding quarter may take three courses at the home college, paying tull tees there. And 
register at the other college tor one additional course without additional cost, students 
majoring in Business Education may take more than onv course in these subject areas 



18 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 






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20 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Student Life 

One of the primary aims of the educational mission at Armstrong State College is the 
total development of students. This growth process is enhanced by integrating opportu- 
nities for social, emotional, cultural, physical and spiritual development in addition to 
intellectual growth. The Division of Student Affairs is committed to providing programs 
and services which foster an educational environment which will assist students in 
achieving their full potential. The college encourages learning through involvement in 
the residence center, student government, campus organizations, intramurals, and more. 

Residence Life and Food Service 

The residence center, completed in September of 1985, consists of three buildings 
which house 64 students each. The apartment-style design encourages student interac- 
tion without a loss of privacy. Each two-bedroom suite, accommodating four students, 
has a bath and living room. All units are fully furnished, carpeted, and have unit-con- 
trolled heat and air conditioning. Phone jacks and an on-site coin laundry are added 
conveniences. Several units are equipped to accommodate students with disabilities. The 
residence complex is staffed by a head resident and resident assistants. These students are 
chosen on the basis of leadership and willingness to serve their fellow students. 

Students who live in college housing are required to participate in the 19-meal plan 
provided in the Memorial College Center. The plan includes three meals per day, 
Monday through Friday, and morning and evening meals on the weekend. The meal plan 
is also available for students who do not choose to live in college housing. 

Housing applications and/or specific information should be requested from the 
Office of Admissions or the Office of Student Affairs. 

Student Involvement 

The Orientation Program is designed to promote social and academic adjustment of 
new students and transfer students. CHAOS (Communication, Help, Advisement, 
Orientation and Service) provides new students with the information, services and 
support essential to a successful transition into the Armstrong community. Participants 
in these one day summer CHAOS sessions receive individual attention from student 
leaders and staff as they acquire first hand experience with academic advising, registra- 
tion, campus facilities, student activities, and college policies/procedures. The CHAOS 
program is a cooperative effort of student leaders and college staff. Competitive selection 
of student leaders occurs annually during Spring Quarter. Inquiries concerning CHAOS 
should be addressed to the Office of Student Affairs. An abbreviated orientation program 
is scheduled for students new to the college prior to registration Winter, Spring, and 
Summer Quarters. 

The Student Government Association is the official governing body of the students 
at Armstrong State College. It assists in formulating a program of student services and 
activities, and it strives to express the will of the majority of students and to provide 
experience in democratic living. All students are automatically members of the SGA and 
are entitled to vote in SGA elections. Qualified students may seek positions of leadership 
in the Student Government Association by running for office during the Winter elections. 

Student Clubs and Organizations provide Armstrong State College students with 
opportunities to develop leadership skills, broaden their social and professional back- 
grounds., and make a significant contribution to the college and the community. They 
reflect the natural variety of interests found in a diverse student body. Inquiries concern- 
ing any campus club or organization should be addressed to the Office of Student 
Activities. 

Religious: Baptist Student Union. 

Greek: Alpha Gamma Delta Sorority and Phi Mu Sorority. 



STUDENT LIFE 21 



Professional: Armstrong Biological Society American ( hemical So 
Ihroj ub VS( Engineering Society G iation of ! 

lames Moore Wayne Law Club |i American Dental Hygienisl '' lical 

rechnology Club, Student Georgia Association of Educators rhel B rwiti 
(Psychology) and the Armstrong Economk <. lub 

Spe< ial Interest Band ( heerleaders, c horus, <. ollege Republic arts, I he 
Environmental Coalition \Si Gospel Choij w Hispanic S 
■ I l nsemble, and Women of Worth (WOW | 

Academk Honoi Societies recognize and encourage superioi scholarship in man) 
fields of stud) Campus < hapters inc lude Alpha Sigma c hi (Physical I ducal 
Bets Bets (Biology) Alpha Sigma c hi (Physical Education) and Sigma Delta rati 
(1 nglish) 

Student Publications pun Ide opportunities for students to develop skills in i restive 
writing, reporting, photography and design rhe Geechee (yearbook), Inkwell (new 
per) and Calliope (literary magazine) are all produced In students under the supen ision 
of appro> ed college ad\ isors. Student Photographic Sen ices prcn idesemplo) men! and 
gnition for Student photographers. All are financed primarily bj the Student 
Acth ity l und. 

Intramural and Recreation Offerings. I he college places a high priority on its 
intramural and recreational offerings and provides a wide variety of activities 
including organized competitive sports. I he physical education complex includes an 
indoor olympic-size pool, gymnasium and weight room. Outdoor facilities for tennis and 
field sports are adjacent. 

The Intercollegiate Athletics Program at Armstrong is affiliated with the National 
Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) I h\ ision II. Athletic scholarships are available 
to support student-athletes who participate in the intercollegiate program I he men s 
athletic teams consist of basketball, baseball, tennis, and cross countT) W omen S teams 
include tennis, cross country, volleyball, and basketball. Cheerleaders are also spon- 
sored. Armstrong State College is affiliated with the Teach Bell Athletic c onference. 
(Armstrong State College. Augusta College, Columbus College. Francis Marion 
College. Georgia College, Kennesaw State College, Lander College. Pembroke State 
University, ISC Aiken, and USC Spartanburg). 

Cultural Opportunities on campus and off ire an important aspect in the total 
educational process. Nationally known speakers, contemporar) concerts, dances popu- 
lar films, exhibits, and performances by outstanding classical and modern artists from 
around the world complement the student's general education, these programs are 
selected and coordinated by the College Union Board. Student dramatic, choral. and 
instrumental groups, under professional direction, have established distinguished 
traditions. On-campus offerings, such as the Faculty 1 ecture Series! broaden knowl- 
edge and interest in a non-classroom setting. I he 1 ,000 seat line Arts Auditorium 
often hosts performances by the Savannah Symphony, area arts groups. and out-of-town 
troupes, such as the National Shakespeare Company and the Vienna Choir B< 

Student Services 

The Counseling Center serves students who are concerned about achieving educa- 
tional and occupational goals and resolving personal problems. Counselorsotter individual 
conferences to students who seek help in choosing a major, setting career goals, studying, 
and dealing with academic demands or conflict with family or friends. Counselors use 
numerous inventories to measure interest and ability, provide information to explore 
education and work opportunities, and instruct students on the use of computerized 
career and study skills development programs. In addition, counselors often are able to 
provide information about college policies, curriculum, and campus resources. 

Inventories of interests, values, and abilities are available to students through 
counseling services. In addition, the following testing programs are administered bv the 



22 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



counseling staff: Academic Profile, ACT, Proficiency Examination Program (PEP), 
College-Level Examination Program (CLEP), DANTES Subject Standardized Tests (DSST), 
Graduate Record Examination (GRE), Major Field Achievement Test (MFAT), Medical 
College Admission Test (MCAT), Miller Analogies Test (MAT), National Teacher Exami- 
nations (NTE), and Regents' Testing Program. Other testing programs about which 
information is available include the Dental Admission Test (DAT), Graduate Manage- 
ment Admission Test (GMAT), Law School Admission Test (LSAT), Optometry Admission 
Testing Program, Pharmacy College Admission Test, and Veterinary Aptitude Test. 

Career Planning and Placement provides assistance with all aspects of career develop- 
ment and the job search process. Students can receive assistance with the early stages of 
career development such as selecting a major, gathering occupational information, 
investigating career paths through individualized career counseling and computerized 
career guidance techniques. The Career Planning & Placement Office also offers an 
innovative and exciting experiential career development program entitled Project Ex- 
plore. The program is designed to proactively address the needs of Armstrong State 
College students in the career exploration process. Project Explore encompasses coopera- 
tive education opportunities, as well as internship and volunteer experiences. With the 
assistance of this program, students and alumni will have the opportunity to interact with 
professionals in the working world. Part-time and full-time employment opportunities 
are coordinated by the Director of Career Planning & Placement and the office staff. 
Students closer to graduation may take advantage of one-on-one instruction and work- 
shops for resume writing, mock interviews, interviewing skills and job search strategies. 
Local, regional, and national job listings, referrals, and on-campus interview services are 
also available to students and alumni registered with the office. The Career Planning & 
Placement Office also hosts a Recruiters' Fair as well as an Education Career Day annually 
for juniors and seniors. All juniors and seniors are strongly urged to register with the 
office prior to graduation to establish a placement file and become eligible for placement 
services. 

The Alcohol and Drug Education Office provides campus alcohol and drug preven- 
tion programming; and services to students with concerns about alcohol /drug issues 
which include: personal assessments, counseling, or referral to community treatment 
programs. Assistance is also offered for other personal issues. The alcohol/drug educa- 
tion counselor coordinates support group meetings on campus and collaborates with 
local prevention and treatment facilities. Training is provided for residence hall advisors 
and CHAOS Leaders. Classroom instruction is provided upon request of instructors. 
Resource materials are available. 

Elderhostel is an educational adventure for older adults looking for new beginnings, 
opportunities, and challenges. Participants from all over the world travel to college 
campuses, recreational sites, and conference centers in over 47 countries to experience 
academic, cultural, and social enlightenment. Participants are on site for a week, usually 
participating in three courses set up by the program coordinator. These courses are 
strictly informational, requiring no testing and no grading, and are often supplemented 
with tours and extracurricular activities. 

Armstrong State College has been providing Elderhostel since 1986 and now offers 
more than 45 weeks of programming per year at two sites: ASC campus and Tybee Island. 
Armstrong's program is open to applicants within the community, nationwide, or 
abroad. Individuals 60 years of age and older are eligible. The program brings in more 
than 1400 participants in a year, contributing to Georgia's status as the second most 
popular state within the national program. 

Veterans will find the Office of Financial Aid and Veterans Affairs helpful in advising 
about admissions procedures and services available to them. 

Students with Disabilities are provided with needed services on an individual basis. 
After students are accepted to the college, if they have special needs as a result of a disability, 
they should set up an appointment in the Office of Student Affairs with the Director of 
Disability Services, to discuss their disability as it relates to their educational program. 



STUDENT LIFE 23 



I he Minority Uh latmenfl Program helps minority students develop interest in .ill 
facets ol college life V peer advisor offers one-on -one assistant v tostiidentsinadju 
to persona] and academic life on campus In addition, km ial, cultural and educational 
a< ti\ ities designed to broaden .ill students' know ledge ol Afrit an Vmeri< an \ > 
theii contributions to so< iet) are presented 

rhe tdults Back to < ollege Program m ee ts the special needs and concerns of the 
non traditional student Mature students vi ho are beginnings ollege 01 are returning 
several years awa) will find thai tin- A B.( program will ease their transition to student 
life and address their career and academk questions 

I he Office ol NontradirJonal I earning, located in Gamble 104, r e sp onds to 
and concerns ol e^ ening, weekend/ and reentr) students. Open till 9KX) on most wei • 
evenings and on Saturda) and Sundaj afternoons, tin- Office houses tnformation on 

mis and college services, hosts focus group sessions and works! 
develops and coordinates distance learning programs (courses delivered h\ means ol 
cable telei ision, satellite, and teleconferencing), and pro> ides indh idual guicuuv e to the 
now majority ol reentr) students on and off campus — students whose academii goals 
w ere deferred or Interrupted for reasons ol work, famil) . or other t ommitments 

rhe Academic Computing Center houses separate minicomputer and microcom- 
puter facilities for student use. All machines in the Vcademi< t omputing c enter are 
connected to the campus wide network and allow access to file sen its an J other network 
sen toes. 1 here is also a separate Engineering microcomputer lab with high performance 
Zenith color workstations and a 1 lew litt-Packard high speed pen plotter 

The Advisement Center, located on the second floor ol I ane I ibrarv, provides 
academic advisement for undeclared majors ^nd students who ha\ i'( \\ defk H'licu's in 
languages, social science, or sciences. I he Center is staffed bj faculty \ olunteers from the 
academic departments I ach quarter during Advance Registration (a two-week period 
after mid-term), students are expected to meet with an ^d\ isor to select COUTSeS for the 

following quarter. .\d\ isors are also available during the rest ol the quarter for questions 
about core curriculum, transfer credit, majors, ^nd career choices 

The Writing Center is a place where students in all disciplines ma\ come for help with 
their writing. I utors in the Writing Center otter individual instruction in basic writing 
skills and provide guidance m the preparation of essa\s, reports, and research papers 
I he aim of the Writing Center is not only to assist students m ^orv composition COU1 
hut also to work with faculty to Improve writing across the curriculum. I he center 1^ 
administered b) the Department of Languages, 1 iterarure, and Dramatic Arts 

The Reading Lab is used by students who feel the need tor assistance in college level 
reading. Staffed b) student tutors ^nd by faculty volunteers from the Department of 
Developmental Studies, the lab is open 6-8 hours a day ^nd, in addition to one-on-one 
assistance, offers audiotapes and computer programs that totter the development of 
reading skills. The lab is administered by the Department of 1 )e\ elopmental Studies ^nd 
is located on the second floor of the Lane 1 ibrar\ . 

The Math Tutorial Center provides services on a first-come, first-served basis to a 
large number of students enrolled primarily in De\ elopmental Studies math or in College 
Algebra, rhe Center is staffed 6-8 hours a day by student tutors and by faculty volunteers 
from Developmental Studies. The lab is administered jointly by the Department of 
Developmental Studies and the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, and 
is located on the second floor oi the 1 ane Library. 

Lane Library, built in 1966 and substantially enlarged in 1975, supports the academic 
programs at Armstrong State College. To that end. library faculty pro\ ide individual 
assistance in using library resources as well as course-integrated instruction in the 
classroom. The traditional repository role oi academic libraries is enhanced through 
computer-assisted database searching, compact disc information systems, online card 
catalog, online circulation and a si/eable collection oi non-print materials. The library is 
open more than 87 hours weekly during academic sessions. 



24 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



The library collections consist of more than 700,000 total items, including 1 67,000 book 
volumes, 542,000 microforms, and 35,000 records, slides, motion pictures, kits, and 
videotapes. In addition, subscriptions are maintained to approximately 1,173 periodicals 
and newspapers. The Florence Powell Minis Collection contains college archives, mate- 
rials of local color, and first editions by Conrad Aiken and other Savannah authors. 

Through participation in state, regional and national resource sharing agreements, 
materials which are not available on the Armstrong campus may be obtained from other 
libraries. Traditional reference services are complemented by computerized database 
searching, both online, by reference librarians and at several compact disc stations by 
library users. 

Library programs at Armstrong seek to meet the needs of each student in the course 
of study while also preparing graduates for life-long learning. 

The Book Store is the source of all required textbooks and course-related supplies. It 
also offers general supplies and a selection of imprinted apparel and gift items. 

Parking Regulations 

All vehicles driven on campus must display a college parking decal on the left rear 
bumper. Free decals are available at the Public Safety Office on Science Drive. 

All students, faculty, and staff are encouraged to become aware of the parking 
regulations. A set of regulations may be picked up in the Public Safety Office or Office of 
Student Affairs, and a copy is published in Students Illustrated. 







kJ r%i_ 




i ^ _— 



IS 



26 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



General Admission Policies 

Armstrong State College welcomes students who wish to pursue a college-level 
program of study. Applicants must provide evidence of a reasonable possibility of 
academic success in college in order to be admitted as a regular student. Applicants who 
do not meet the minimum requirements for admission may be admitted under condi- 
tional or provisional status or under other Special Admission Categories. 

Armstrong State College reserves the right to employ appropriate assessment mecha- 
nisms to ascertain the suitability of applicants to enroll in the College and to deny 
enrollment or admission to individuals based upon the results of the assessment. 

Final acceptance or rejection of each applicant is determined by the Director of 
Admissions and is subject to the applicant's right of appeal to the Academic Standing 
Committee prior to the beginning of the desired quarter of entry. The committee will 
review the appeal and make a recommendation to the President of the College, who will 
render a decision. The College reserves the right to withdraw admission prior to or 
following enrollment if the student becomes ineligible as determined by the standards of 
the College or Board of Regents. 

Armstrong State College reserves the right to refuse to accept any or all of the credits 
from any high school or other institution, notwithstanding its accredited status, when the 
College determines through investigation or otherwise that the quality of instruction at 
such high school or institution is, for any reason, deficient or unsatisfactory. The 
judgement of the College on this question shall be final. 

The College reserves the right to reject an applicant who is not a resident of the State 
of Georgia. All students enrolled at Armstrong State College are required to affirm that 
they will abide by the provisions of the Honor Code. 

Admission Requirements 

It is the responsibility of the applicant to request that official documents required for 
admission be sent directly from the previous institutions to the Office of Admissions. 
Documents that have been in the hands of the applicant, such as student copy transcripts 
or letters, grade reports, diplomas, or graduation lists are not official. The documents 
must be issued and mailed directly by the registrar of the previous institution(s) in a 
sealed envelope. These documents become part of the applicant's permanent record and 
will not be returned. 

The following items are required for admission: 

1. OFFICIAL APPLICATION FORM. An applicant seeking admission must file an 
application for admission prior to the specified deadline as indicated in the 
academic calendar. An application may be obtained from the Office of Admissions. 
Care should be taken to read the directions accompanying the application and 
provide all information requested. An incomplete application will cause delay and 
may be returned to the applicant. 

2. CERTIFICATE OF IMMUNIZATION. All applicants must submit a University of 
Georgia Certificate of Immunization verifying immunity against measles, mumps, 
and rubella. This form must accompany the application. 

3. A $10 NONREFUNDABLE APPLICATION FEE. This processing fee is required 
with applications. 

4. OFFICIAL TRANSCRIPT(S) OF COURSES COMPLETED. All documents must be 
on file in the Office of Admissions prior to the specified document deadline 
indicated in the academic calendar. A freshman applicant should ask his or her 
guidance department to send an official copy of the high school transcript. A 
delayed decision candidate must submit an official high school transcript and 
official college transcripts, if applicable. A transfer candidate should ask the 
registrar from each accredited college attended to send a transcript of grades (a 
separate transcript from each college) and submit a high school transcript if he or 



ADMISSIONS 27 



she has attempted less than !6quarterhoui heholdei 

( ,\ D certificate musl request that an official score report be lent to t h«- 1 >m 
Admissions Please see fecial Kdmissioi 
I] I k I \i S< ORI SON nil sc HOI VSTK \niii Dl [*ES1 
Entrance Examination Board 01 INI VMERK AN COLLEGI rESTING I 
GR wi (ACT) Applications and information ma) be obtained from th< 
Entrance Examination Board (Box >92 Princeton, Nev* |erso\ 
American College resting Program | 1355 Lenox Road, \ I Suite (20 Atl 
Gei rhe t I I B code assigned to Armstroi 

005012 An Institutional Scholastl< Aptitude rest (BAT) is offered quarterly 
through tin- c ounseling and Placement Office I s \ I scores can be used onh foi 
admission to Armstrong State ( ollege \ freshman candidate is required tosubmit 
SAT or AC Tsu ores \ holder oi the ( .1 D certificate is also required to submit SA1 
es \ transfer < andidate w ho has attempted less than J6 quarter hours 
or 24 semester hours must also submit SA1 or AC I scores I Kceptions to the SA1 
and .u I requirements are discussed in the Spe< ial Admissions se< Hon. 
6 OTHER RJ Ql IRI Ml NTS. I he College may require any applicant to appear for a 
personal inten icw and to take any achievement aptitude and ps) chological tests 
it deems appropriate in order to make a decision regarding the applicant's 
qualification for admission to the College. 

Admission of Recent High School Graduates 

An applicant must be a graduate of ^n accredited high school. Students graduating 
from high school in the Spring of l988,or later, must meet the requirements oi theC ollege 
Preparatory Curriculum (CPC) of the Board of Regents. Students who lack required 

courses in an) of the five areas must make up the deficiencies according to established 
guidelines. 1 he following high school courses are minimum requirements tor regular 
admission: 

Units Instructional Emphasis/Courses 

English (4) * Grammar ,-\nd usage 

* Literature (American and World) 

* Ad\ anced composition skills 
Science (3) * Ph\ sicaJ Science 

* At least two laboratory courses from Biolog 
Chemistrx or Ph) sics 

Mathematics (3) * Two courses in Algebra and one in C .eometr\ 

Social Science (3) * American 1 tistor) 

* World History 

* Economics ^nd c .o\ eminent 

Foreign language (2) * Two courses in one language emphasizing speaking 
(must be listening, reading ^no\ writing) 

The minimum regular admission requirements to Armstrong State College are an SA I 
score oi not less than 380 on the verbal section mu\ 380 on the math section individually, 

or an ACT score of not less than 20 on the English section mu\ IS on the math section 
individually. Also a minimum 2.0 grade point average on all academic course 
required. All of the academic courses computed in the high school grade point a\ i 
will have been taken in grades 9-12. 

Provisional Admission 

Applicants to the College who do not meet the College Preparatory Curriculum (CPC) 
will be considered for provisional admission to the College. The following represents the 



28 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



English - Students graduating with less than the four required units of English will 
be required to take the Collegiate Placement Examination (CPE) in English and the CPE 
in Reading. Based on the student's score, the student would (1) exempt Developmental 
Studies English and/or Reading, or (2) be placed in Developmental Studies English and/ 
or Reading. 

Mathematics - Students graduating with less than the three required units of 
mathematics will be required to take the Collegiate Placement Examination (CPE) in 
mathematics. Based on the student's score, the student would (1) exempt Develop- 
mental Studies mathematics, or (2) be placed in Developmental Studies mathematics 
at the appropriate level. 

Science - Students graduating with less than the three required units of science will be 
required to take an additional five quarter hour (for credit) course in a laboratory science. 

Social Science - Students graduating with less than the three required units of social 
science will be required to complete one additional five quarter hour (for credit) course 
chosen from approved social science courses. 

Foreign Language - Students graduating with less than the two units of the same 
foreign language will be required to complete one additional five quarter hour (for 
credit) introductory foreign language course. 

All course work required as a result of a deficiency must be completed prior to the 
accumulation of 30 hours. In the areas of social science, science, and foreign language, the 
student is required to complete the appropriate course with a "C" grade or better. 
Students receive credit for courses used to satisfy College Preparatory Curriculum 
deficiencies, but such credit may not be used to satisfy core curriculum or degree 
requirements. 

Exceptions to the CPC Requirement 

1 . Any applicant who graduated from high school prior to Spring of 1988 is exempt from 
CPC requirements. 

2. An applicant applying for any associate of applied science or associate of science 
degree program offered by Armstrong State College is exempt from the CPC require- 
ments. 

Conditional Admission 

An applicant who qualifies for admission to the College but who does not qualify for 
regular admission will be granted conditional admission. A student is conditionally 
admitted to the College if any part of the SAT score (verbal or math) is less than 380. A 
student is conditionally admitted to the College if the ACT English is less than 20, or ACT 
Math is less than 18. An applicant who scores less than 250 verbal or 280 mathematics on 
the SAT (less than 13 on the ACT English or less than 14 on the ACT math) and has less 
than a 1.8 high school grade point average on all academic courses will be denied 
admission to the College. 

All conditionally admitted students must take the Collegiate Placement Examination 
(CPE) in order to qualify for regular admission. This examination must be taken before 
a student can register for classes. 

Any student placed in a course numbered below 100, as a result of placement testing, 
will be considered a conditionally admitted Developmental Studies student. 

Any other courses taken prior to completing and passing appropriate parts of the CPE 
must be approved by the Developmental Studies Counselor or by an advisor within that 
department. 

Any student who is in the Developmental Studies Program or signs up for a Develop- 
mental Studies course must have a schedule of classes approved by the Developmental 
Studies Counselor or by an advisor within that department each time the student 
registers. 



ADMISSIONS 



\ student in .» I developmental Studies course will exil I developmental Studic* in the 
follow ing m .n 9 

1 Passing all required parts of the< ollegiate Placement I lamination 

2 If an) required part of the ( PI isnotpassed the student will be required to enroll 
In the appropriate Developmental Studies course Upon successful completi 

all required Developmental Studies courses and passing the ( PI the student will 

exit I V\ elopmental Studies 
^ student in Dei elopmental Studies will be given tour quarters pei 
tulK exit that area \ student foiling to exit an area aftei four attempts will besubk 
I V\ elopmental Studies suspension, c opiesoi the policies o( me Developmental Stu 
Program ma) be obtained from the De> elopmental Studies Off! 

Credit by Examination 

Armstrong State College will grant up to one-fourth ol the credit required in .1 college 
1 for satisfa< tor) s< ores on the following examinations: 



u I: Proficienc) I xamination Program 
(PI P) 
Statistics 

Advanced Placement 

Biology - 4 

English 1 iterature & C omposition - 3C 

Calculus AB-3 

Calculus BC-3 

Computer Science AB - 3 

Chemistry - 3 

American History - 3 

European 1 tistory - 3 

Government <.md Politics: U.S. -3C 
ATP Achievement Tests 

American History - national average 

European History - national a\ erage 
College-Level Examination Program 
(CLEP) 

Humanities 

Natural Sciences 



Analysis mk\ Interpretation ol 

I iterature 55< 
( ollege ( omposition with I ssaj 
c ollege l ren< h 45( 

College German 44C 
College Spanish - 4^c 
American c lovernmenf 47< 
American History I - 4^ 
American I Eistor) II 4^ 
Introductory Sociology 4~ 
Western c [\ ilization I - 46 
\\ estem Civilization 11-47 
Calculus with Elementary 

Functions - 5 5 
College Algebra 52 
College Algebra- 1 rigonometr) - 54 
DANTES Subject Tests 
Astronomy - 61 
Criminal [ustice - 49 
General Anthropology -47 



I hese guidelines are subject to change without notice. 

Academic departments select the examinations and determine passing scores which 
follow the tot titles. The letter C following a score denotes conditional credit .md means 
that an additional requirement must be satisfied before credit hours will be awarded. For 
example, the award of credit in American Government is contingent upon passing a local 
test on Georgia go^ eminent, as well as an APorC IIP test. 1 he credit hoursawarded are 
the same as those earned by students who complete the equivalent coursers). I he letter- 
grade K is used to identify credit by examination and has no effect on the academic grade 
point average. The Office of the Registrar adds courses and credit hours to the academic 
records of enrolled students. A brochure published by the Division of Student Affairs lists 
equivalent courses, any conditions for award oi credit, t md test dates 

For additional information, please make inquiry to the Office of the Registrar 
Director of Admissions, the Office oi Student Affairs, or the head of the appropriate 
academic department. 



30 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



College Credit for Military Experience and Training 

Students who wish to have their military experience and training evaluated for college 
credit should submit a copy of appropriate forms to the Registrar's office. Veterans 
should submit DD Form 214 and active duty military personnel should submit DD Form 
295. Active duty Army personnel and soldiers discharged since October 1, 1986, should 
also provide the Registrar with a copy of their Army/American Council on Education 
Registry Transcript. 

Regents Engineering Transfer Program 

The Regents Engineering Program (RETP) at Armstrong State College provides two 
access points for admission. 

I. At the time of admission to Armstrong State College the student must have 
achieved at least: a 550 on the mathematics portion of the Scholastic Aptitude Test 
(SAT); a 450 on the verbal portion of the SAT; and a 3.0 high school grade point 
average. However, any student who has been admitted to an engineering program 
at Georgia Tech on the basis of his/her academic record can enter Armstrong State 
College as a RETP student even if the above requirements are not met. 

II. Students at Armstrong State College who did not qualify for admission to the RETP 
under Access Point I but want to join at the end of the freshman year must fulfill 
the following acceptance criteria: completion of Mathematics 206 and 207 with 
grades of "B" or higher; completion of Chemistry 128 and 129 with grades of "B" 
or better; a college grade point average of 3.0 for Georgia residents and 3.1 for out- 
of-state residents. 

Regents Engineering Transfer Program students who satisfactorily complete the 
pre-engineering curriculum and apply for transfer will be accepted to Georgia Tech. 
However, admission to the most popular majors, as for other Georgia Tech students, 
will be based upon overall grade point average, performance in the required prerequisite 
courses and availability of student spaces. 

Requirements of Transfers 

1. Transfer students completing high school in the Spring of 1988, or later, from 
non-University System institutions will be required to submit their high school 
transcripts as part of their application process unless they have completed their 
freshman and sophomore years, completed an associate degree, or have more than 45 
hours of transfer credit approved. This requirement also applies to students enrolled 
in University System programs that do not require the College Preparatory Curricu- 
lum for admission. 

2. Transfer students completing high school in the Spring of 1988, or later, transferring 
from University System institutions will maintain their CPC status as determined by 
the first University System institution making the original CPC evaluation. 

3. Transfer applicants completing high school prior to Spring of 1988 will follow the 
same procedure as freshman applicants except these applicants will not be required 
to meet the College Preparatory Curriculum requirements. In addition, these appli- 
cants who have achieved sophomore standing at the time of entrance, will not be 
required to submit their high school records. Such records may be required by the 
Office of Admissions, but normally the transcripts of previous college records will 
suffice in place of the high school record. Transfer applicants must ask the Registrar, 
of each college they have previously attended, to mail an official transcript of their 
records to the Office of Admissions at Armstrong State College, regardless of the 
transferability of the credits. 

4. Transfer applicants will not be considered for admission unless they are academically 
eligible to return to the college or university last attended, or unless the officials of the 
institution last attended recommend the applicant's admission. 



ADMISSION'. It 



[ransfei applicants wiii be considered for admission to Krm 

on all work attempted .it othei institutions theij m ademu performai »wn l»\ 

theii grade poinl average is equivalent to the minimum standard requin 

strong State ^ o I lege students b) comparable standing Student not n 

required GPA maj be admitted on Good Standing, with Warnii hail undei 

^cademii Probation and Dismissal Policy in the Vcademii Regulal tionof 

this( atalog I 

redil will be gh en foi transfer work in which students received .1 grade 
above <> redil will also be given for transfer work in which the student 

les ol P with tin* limitation mat such credit From nonl niversiry S 
institutions will nol exceed kwent) five percent ol the total amount of cred 
with grades ol C or above. ( oflege ( redil will not be allowed for such coui 
remedial 1 nglish remedial mathematics, or remedial reading or* ourses basically of 
set ondar) s< hool le\ el. 

I ransfer students From outside the Universit) System ol I leorgia who have not yet 
completed the required I nglish courses pres4 ribed bj Armstroi zrams 

should visit the I director ol Composition for a placement inten iew At this inten iev« . 
the Director ol Composition will evaluate student transcripts tor \ nglish credits, 
administer the English Placement rest m necessary), provide information on the 
composition sequence and the( leorgia Regents' I est, and determine placemenl in the 
appropriate composition course. Inten iev« schedules are available in tlu-c Office ol the 
Registrar and in the Department ol I anguages, Literature, and Dramatic Arts In 
addition, transfer of an American c ,o\ emmenl course in substitution tor rt >s 1 1 ) is 
contingent upon passing a local test on the Georgia constitution. 
v I ransfer credit ma) be accepted From degree granting institutions that art- aa redited 
at the collegiate level b) their appropriate regional accrediting agency. Provisions 
ma) be considered when ^n institution appeals the polic\ Students transferring from 
An institution w huh is nol a member ol a regional accrediting agency must achieve 
a\ erage on their first fifteen quarter hours ol work at Armstrong in order to he 
eligible to continue. In certain areas they may he required to validate credits b\ 
examination. In computing cumulative grade a\ erages, onh the work attempted at 
Armstrong will be considered. 

9. The amount ol credit that Armstrong will allow for work done in another institution 
within a gi\ en period oi time may not exceed the normal amount ol credit that could 
have been earned at Armstrong during that time. A maximum oi 100 quarter hours 
may be transferred from a junior college. At least half of the courses in the major must 
be taken at Armstrong. 

10. Not more than one-fourth oi the work counted toward a degree ma\ consisl of 
courses taken by correspondence, extension, or examination. No correspondence 
courses may be used to meet the requirements in the major Field or the related fields 

for the Bachelor's degree or in English composition or foreign language. No correspon- 
dence courses ma) be taken while a student is enrolled, without prior approval ot the 
appropriate Dean Anol the head ot the department in which the student is majoring. 

lilt the I ore Curriculum requirements in Area I (Humanities), .Area II (Sciences), and 
or Area III (Social Sciences) have been completed in a University System ot Georgia 
institution, each completed area will be accepted as having met the respective area 
requirement at Armstrong State College. 

12. An official evaluation oi all previous college credit earned will be done during the 
first quarter oi the applicant's attendance provided that all transcripts are on tile. 
Transfer credit will be awarded from institutions listed in the .American Association 
of College Admission Officers and Registrars as being accredited. 



32 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Developmental Studies Transfer Student Policy 

Conditionally admitted transfer students must meet the same admission require- 
ments as individuals admitted to the College for the first time. A complete record of the 
student's past remedial coursework and CPE scores must be on file in the Armstrong 
Sta te College Registrar's Office before the student can be admitted. Further, conditionally 
admitted transfer students must be eligible to return to their previous institutions before 
they will be considered for admission to Armstrong State College. Students who have not 
exited Developmental Studies at another University System school need to be advised by 
the Developmental Studies Department, but do not have to sign up for another CPE. 

Readmission 

Students who have not been enrolled at Armstrong for two or more consecutive 
quarters must apply for readmission on a form provided by the Office of The Registrar. 
Former students who have not attended another college since leaving Armstrong may be 
readmitted, provided they are not on suspension at the time they wish to reenter. Former 
students who have attended another college since leaving Armstrong must meet re- 
quirements as listed in the catalog in effect at the time of return. A student who is 
readmitted after an absence from the college for more than two years must meet degree 
requirements as listed in the catalog in effect at the time of his or her return. 

Transient Students 

Students enrolled in another college or university may apply for temporary admission 
to Armstrong State College. They must have written approval from their Dean or 
Registrar that they are in good standing and have permission to take specific courses at 
Armstrong State College to be transferred to their own institution when satisfactorily 
completed. Transient students are admitted for a specific period of time, normally one 
quarter. If they wish to remain at Armstrong State College longer than one quarter they 
must submit additional statements from their Dean or Registrar, or must meet all 
requirements for regular admission as a transfer student. 

Armstrong Students Transient Elsewhere 

Armstrong students who wish to take course work at another college with the intent 
of applying the courses to their academic record at Armstrong may do so in accordance 
with regulations for transient status to another college. Students must meet the require- 
ments stipulated by the other college, and, in order to apply the credits toward their 
academic records at Armstrong, must meet the academic regulations of Armstrong. 
Consult with the Registrar's Office for details. 

Accelerated Program for High School Students 

Through this program for superior high school juniors and seniors, students may 
complete more than two-thirds of the freshman year of college before beginning a regular 
college career. Students accepted into the program may choose any freshman course 
provided they meet course prerequisites and receive permission from their high school 
principal or counselor and their college advisor. 

Students in this program may enroll for college credit in a maximum of two courses 
each quarter while completing their senior year of high school. Upon graduation from 
high school, the student will be admitted as a regular college enrollee. 

Students forfeit the privilege of this program if they receive a college course grade 
below C or their high school average in academic courses falls below B in any quarter. 

The College will consider students for this program only upon written recommen- 
dation of their high school principals or counselors. 






ADMISSIONS 



robe admitted to the program students must satisfy .ill i»t the foll< 
I Written recommendation b) the principal elor of trv 

a ritten consent of parent 01 guardian (H the student Is a mil 
I ompletion ol the tenth grade in an a< i redited higl 
i \ combined verbal and mathematics SA1 icon? of no less than 1 r ACI 

<, omposite m> les^ thai 

\ minimum high school grade point average on all academic a 
<. ompletion ol the I ruversit) System of < Georgia's Col le lum 

requirements with the follow ing ex< eptions 
Students* ithanS \ l verbal score ol .it least 450 (or u l l nglisl 
w ho tun e not completed the final unit ol high m hool l nglish and «>r so< ial 
studies will be permitted to fulfill these high school requirements with the 
appropriate *. ollege courses 
(b) Students who have no! completed the c ollege Preparatory ( urriculufl 
quirements may be admitted through the joint enrollment progr a m 
below ) it they are enrolled in the- necessary high school courses and s< heduled 
to complete the requirements by the end ol their senior \ 1 
\\ ith the exception ol English and soda! studies courses taken by students w ith the 
required SA1 or VC1 score/ a college course may not be used to fulfill both high school 
c ollege Preparatory c urriculum requirements and college degree requirements 

Early Admission and Joint Enrollment Programs 

Armstrong State College offers ^\n early admission program tor those students who 
have completed the tenth grade in high school ^nd who have demonstrated outstanding 
academic potential. I he criteria for admission to this program are the same as those listed 

tor the Accelerated Program. 

Additionally, the college otters a joint enrollment program which is an early 
admissions program allowing students to enroll full time at the College while 
remaining on the rolls of a local high school. After successfully meeting all established 

criteria tor the Accelerated Program, students will he awarded high School diplorr 
the end of their freshman year in college. For further information on this program 
prospective applicants should consult with their high school counselors m^ request 
information from the Office of Admissions. 

Special Admission Categories 

GED 

An applicant who is not a high school graduate may he considered tor admission 
based upon completion of the General Educational Development Examination (< 

with a score that satisfies the minimum requirement of the State of l.corgia (standard 
score a\ erage-45). A score report must be submitted directly to the College from the l .1 I ) 
testing center w here the student took the test, or b\ 1 > AN \- South Park s " 

Madison. \\ isconsin, 53713) if the Student took the test through the United Mates Armed 
Forces Institute while in military service. It the applicant's high school class graduated 
in the Spring of 1988, or later, then all College Preparatory C urriculum [CPC ) require- 
ments must be met. The only exception to this requirement will be those applicants 
pursuing associate of science or associate of applied science degrees I hese individuals 
are exempt from the CPC requirements. 

Delayed Admission 

Applicants who have not attended high school or college within the previous five 
years, and have earned fewer than 20 transferable quarter hours oi college credit, are not 



34 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



required to take the SAT or ACT admissions test. However, these applicants will be 
required to take the Collegiate Placement Examination and complete any Developmental 
Studies requirements. Students admitted under this category must complete 30 hours of 
college credit with a minimum 2.0 grade point average in order to be granted regular 
admission status. 

Persons 62 Years of Age or Older 

Persons who are 62 years of age, or older, may enroll as regular students in credit 
courses on a "space available" basis without payment of fees, except for supplies, 
laboratory or special course fees. They must be residents of the State of Georgia and 
must present a birth certificate or comparable written documentation of age to enable 
the Admissions Office to determine eligibility. They must meet all admission and 
degree requirements. 

International Students 

(All students who are citizens of countries other than the U.S.) 

It is recommended that international students begin their attendance at the college in 

the Fall Quarter. The college also recommends that international students attend an ELS 

language center prior to enrollment. 

Students from a country other than the United States who are interested in attending 

Armstrong must meet the following requirements before application is made: 

1. Meet the requirements of freshman applicants. International students must have 
completed the equivalent of a U.S. high school. However, College Preparatory 
Curriculum (CPC) requirements do not apply to these students. 

2. Have an official transcript of academic records mailed to the Office of Admissions 
at Armstrong with an official translation. 

3. If SAT or ACT scores are available, ask that the results be sent to Armstrong. If these 
scores are not available, the student will be required to take the Collegiate 
Placement Examination and take any such required coursework in accordance 
with the Developmental Studies Guidelines. 

4. A student whose native language is not English must take the Test of English as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFL) and score a minimum of 500 for consideration for 
admission to the College. 

5. Submit a statement of financial resources prior to attendance. 

6. Show proof of adequate health and life insurance. 

After completion of application form and submission of all required records, the 
College will make a decision on the application. If an application is approved, the 
College will send an 1-20 form (which the international student will use to obtain a 
student visa). Upon arrival these students may be tested in English composition for 
class placement purposes. 

Admission of Veterans 

After having been accepted at Armstrong State College and upon receipt of Certifica- 
tion of eligibility and entitlement from the Veterans Administration, veterans may attend 
under Public Law 358 (Veterans Readjustment Benefit Act of 1966), Public Law 815 
(disabled), Public Law 894 (disabled), Public Law 634 (war orphans), or Public Law 631 
(children of permanently disabled veterans). Students under Public Laws 358, 631, 634 
should be prepared to pay tuition and fees at the time of registration. 

Vocational Rehabilitation Applicants 

Those applicants sponsored by Vocational Rehabilitation or other community agen- 
cies must apply at least six weeks before the beginning of any quarter to insure proper 
processing of applications. 



ADMISSIONS 



Requirements for Admission to Art and Music Programs 

1 lu- v ollege level stud) of artandmusM requires considerable ba< 
ibasi< prohcienc) level rhose students who wish to majoi inarl 

the fecult) a portfolio ol previous work in .it least one medium In mu 
examinations are required *>i .ill entering students in musii theon and applied mu 

Requirements and Procedures for Admission to Health 
Programs 

School of Health Professions Statement of Professional Standards 
Related to Applicants and Students 

All applicants to and students enrolled in theSk hool ol \ lealth Professions must meet 
and continue to meet the appro> ed professional standards ol the S< hool and n 
programs. 

1. In order to meel the intellectual, physical and social competencies necessar) to 
meel professional requirements/ all applicants and students must possess the 
needed ph) sical attributes, and exhibit qualities of good judgment, mental strength 
and emotional stability 

2 No applicant \\ ho ma) jeopardize the health and or the \\ ell being ol a patient, 
client, coworker, or self, ma) be accepted into the school ot Health Professions 
program or continue as a student within a program. 

) rhe individual programs will inform each applicant in writing of the technical 

standards which arc related to the professional duties of the discipline. 
4. I he faculty of each program or department shall be responsible for appl) ing the 

standards tor their students and prospecttf e students. 

In all cases, final appeal may he brought to the attention of the Dean of Health 

Professions who would appoint ,\n .Appeals committee 

Insurance 

Because of contractual requirements. Health Insurance is required ot students in 
Associate Degree Nursing, Baccalaureate Degree Nursing, Dental Hygiene Medical 
technology, Radiologic rechnologies and Respirator) therapy. Malpractice Liability 
Insurance is required of students in Associate- 1 tegree Nursing, Baccalaureate I degree 
Nursing, Dental Hygiene, Medical Technology, Radiologic rechnologies and Respira- 
tor) [herapy. 

Limits on Admission to Health Professions Programs 

I here are many more students applying tor admission to these programs than we ha\ e 
spaces available. I herefore, 

1. IT IS IMPORTANT THAI YOl CONTACT THI PROGRAM OF YOl R( HOIC 1 
FOR ADVISEMIM AS SOON AS POSSIB1 1 

2. Admission to Armstrong State College ^nd or completion of prerequisite cow 
do does not guarantee \ ou admission to a I lealth Professions program. Because 
each program has its own admission criteria ,md procedure tor admission, stu- 
dents must apply to the particular programs they wish to enter. 

3. NOMORETHANTWO(2)SCIENCl COURSESMA\ Bl REPEATED, and thai 
NO ONE COURSE MAY BE RI PI All D MORI IN \NONC I [f a student rails a 
course a second time, he she will not be eligible tor admission to the health 
programs tor which this course is a requirement. 

4. ONLY STUDENTS MAKING SATISFACTORY PROGRESS toward admission to 
or in an Armstrong State College health program will be assigned a science scat. 



36 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Associate Degree Nursing 

See Limits on Admission to Health Professions Programs" above. 

Admission to Armstrong State College does not in any way guarantee formal 
admission to the Associate Degree Nursing Program. Application for admission will be 
accepted between January 1st and April 15th for the coming academic year. Admission 
decisions will normally be made in April/May each year. 

The Admissions Committee of the Department of Associate Degree Nursing will act 
only on completed applications. A student seeking admission to the program who has 
taken courses at another college must supply the ADN office with a current transcript. 
After admission to the program, the student must pay a $50.00 non-refundable Health 
Professions Deposit to reserve a seat in the program. This deposit is applied to the 
student's first quarter matriculation fee. Students who qualify for admission but who are 
not admitted because of lack of space may reapply. Students admitted for a given quarter 
must enter the program during that quarter or reapply for admission for any subsequent 
quarter. Determination of admission to the program is a function of the faculty. 

Transfer students must meet the criteria for admission to the Department of Associate 
Degree Nursing as stated. Credit for nursing and science courses taken prior to applica- 
tion to the program must be approved by the Department of Associate Degree Nursing. 
It is recommended that nursing courses not be over one year old and science courses not 
be over five years old. Students wishing to be given credit for nursing courses which are 
over one year old and science courses which are over five years old may be required to 
validate current knowledge by examination or be required to repeat these courses. 

The Associate Degree Nursing Program is approved by the Georgia Board of Nursing 
and is fully accredited by the National League for Nursing (NLN). 

Criteria for Admission 

Admission to the Associate Degree Nursing Program is made on a space available 
basis and is limited to the best qualified students as determined by the Associate Degree 
Nursing faculty using an admission point index system. Admission criteria include: 

1. Completion of ZOO 208 with a grade of "C" or better. 

2. Completion of CHE 201. 

3. Completion of MAT 101. 

4. Eligibility for ENG 101. 

5. A minimum adjusted college GPA of 2.0. 

Time Limit for Program Completion 

Students must complete the Associate Degree Nursing Program within three consecu- 
tive academic years from the date of their initial entry into the program. Students who do 
not complete the program within this time limit must reapply for admission, meet current 
criteria for admission, and have their previous credits evaluated at the time of their 
subsequent admission. Students who are readmitted must meet course requirements in 
effect at the time of their readmission. 

Transfer Applicants 

Transfer applicants and those with degrees in other fields must meet the criteria 
established for admission to the nursing major. Transfer credit will be awarded 
depending upon equivalency of courses. These decisions will be determined by the 
Department of Associate Degree Nursing faculty who will use actual course outlines, 
descriptions, etc., supplied by the student. 

Readmission Procedures 

1. The student must complete the readmission application for Armstrong State 
College and the Department of Associate Degree Nursing. 



ADMISSIONS 37 



2 I he student w ill be required to mevl admission ami * um< ulum requii 
effa t .it the time ol readmission 
If eligible the student's readmission will be based upon lilabilit) 

recommendation in the I Apartment oi \ss t >i i.m 

Baccalaureate Nursing Department 

See l imits on Admission to Health Professions Pi Kdmissi< 

m ol this j ataJ 
applicants to the program must be regularly admitted to Armstrong State ( ol 
prior to making application to tin- nursing major Students musl meel the admission 
requirements ol the I tepartmenl ol Baccalaureate Nursing to be eligible for admission 
to the nursing major. Admission to the nursing major is the function ol the Facult) 
Onl) completed applications will in- considered. 

Students w ill be admitted to tin* nursing major during Winter Quartet . sophon 
year After admission to the nursing major, the student musl submil a non- 

refundable deposit to reserve a scat in the program. I his deposit is applied to tin- tuition 
Students who are not admitted ma) reapply tor the nexl year. 

Applicants ma) address the I load ol the I tepartmenfl ol Baccalaureate Nursing it ti 
require additional information concerning admission procedures 

I he Bachelor of Science degree program is approved In the< leorgia Board ol Nursing 
And is full) accredited by the National 1 eague for Nursing (\l \ 

Criteria for Admission 

Admission criteria include: 

1 . Regular admission to Armstrong State College. 

2. A minimum SA I verbal score ol 

V A minimum SAT mathematics score of 380. (SAI scores will not be required tor 

those applicants with .Associate. Bachelor's or Master's Degrei 
4. A grade ol ( or better in each science course 

5 A minimum adjusted GPA of 2.5 in all prerequisite course work attempted 
However, meeting minimal requirements does not guarantee admission to the 
nursing major. I host 1 applicants who, in the judgment of the Recruitment and 
Retention Committee present the Strongest academic record ,\nd show the most 
promise ol success m the nursing major will be accepted. In making comparisons 
between applicants, the Recruitment and Retention Committee evaluates the 
academic record ol each applicant thoroughly, including an evaluation of grades 
received in particular courses, number of hours completed at ASC , and Regents' 
Test status. 

6. Application to the nursing major must be submitted no later than the cnc\ ol fall 
quarter of the Sophomore year. Applicants will be notified ot their acceptance 
status by the end ot Winter quarter. 

7. Students must meet all legal requirements tor licensure. See Baccalaureate I tegree 
Nursing ' section of this catalog "Georgia Board ot Nursing I egal Requirements 

B Admitted students must submit all required health data, CPR certification, proot 
of health insurance and liability insurance by August l, prior to Fall quarter entry. 

It should be noted that the pool of applicants has increased in quality and quantity in 
recent quarters, and that admission to the nursing major is ot a competitn e nature. 

Transfer Applicants and those with degrees in other fields must meet the criteria 
established for admission to the nursing major. Transfer credit will be awarded 
depending upon equivalency of courses. These decisions will be determined by the 
Nursing Faculty who will use actual course outlines, descriptions, etc.. supplied b\ the 
student. 

Registered Nurse applicants must meet the criteria established tor admission to the 
nursing major and must also submit proof of licensure. 



38 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



All nursing students shall comply with legal, moral, and legislative standards that 
determine unacceptable behavior of the nurse and that may be cause for denial of a license 
to practice as a registered nurse, in accordance with Georgia law regulating practice of 
registered nursing. 

Program Completion Requirements 

Students must complete the Baccalaureate Nursing Program within four consecutive 
years from the date of their initial admission to the nursing major. Students who do not 
complete the program within this time limit must apply for readmission, meet current 
criteria for admission, and have their previous credits evaluated. Students who are 
granted readmission must meet course requirements in effect at the time of readmission. 

Senior nursing students are required to take a written comprehensive exam prior to 
graduation. 

Readmission Procedures 

1. The student must complete the readmission application for Armstrong State 
College and the nursing major. 

2. The student will be required to meet admission and curriculum requirements in 
effect at the time of readmission. 

3. The student's admission will be based upon space available and recommendation 
by the Recruitment and Retention Committee of the Department of Baccalaureate 
Nursing. 

4. Readmission to the nursing major is the function of the faculty. 

Associate Degree Dental Hygiene 

See "Limits on Admission to Health Professions Programs" in the "Admissions" 
section of this catalog. 

Admission to Armstrong State College does not in any way guarantee admission to 
the Associate Degree Program in Dental Hygiene. Applicants must first be accepted for 
admission to the College with regular admission status before the Dental Hygiene 
Admissions Committee evaluates the application to the Associate Degree Program in 
Dental Hygiene. 

Admission to the program is limited in each class. Students matriculate in the Fall 
Quarter of each year. Applications for admission should be completed as soon as possible 
for the Fall quarter and must include a transcript of all academic work. 

The Department has a separate formal admission process in addition to the admission 
process to Armstrong State College. 

The program requires students to submit a complete health history form, evidence of 
health insurance, and evidence of liability (malpractice) insurance prior to participation 
in clinical experiences. 

Criteria for Admission 

Admission to the Associate Degree Dental Hygiene major is on a space available basis 
and is limited to the best qualified students as determined by the Dental Hygiene 
Admissions Committee using an Admission Point Index system. Admission criteria 
include: 

1. Admission to Armstrong State College. 

2. Eligibility for ENG 101 and MAT 101. 

3. A minimum adjusted college GPA of 2.0. 

Because of the heavy emphasis on science in the dental hygiene curriculum, it is 
important that the applicant have a strong foundation in biology and chemistry. 

The Dental Hygiene Admissions Committee will give special consideration to appli- 
cants who have completed one year of college work and who have completed CHE 201 
or ZOO 208 (or their equivalents) with a grade of "C" or better. 



ADMISSION 1 , 



\ttir admiasion to tin- Dental Hygiene Department th*- student 
non refundable I lealth Programs l teposit I*' n eal in trv 

is applied to tin- student b rural quartei matrk illation h 

I heapplu ant ma) request a personal inten \ew with the Dental H 1 missions 

i ommittee to discuss the application aftei all credentials have to 

Challenge Examinations 

c hailenge examinations foi Bp« ifi< dental in giene subjei tan ailable m the 

departonent C onta< I the department for information 

Readmission Procedures 

1 1 he student must complete the readmission application foi Armstrong Stat< 
and the l tepartment oi I Cental 1 1\ giene. 

2 l he student w ill be required to meet admission and ( urri< ulum requirements in i 
at the time oi readmission. 

1 I he student s readmission will Debased upon space a\ ailabilit) and ret oounendation 
In the 1 Cental 1 1\ giene Admissions c ommittee. 

Baccalaureate Degree Dental Hygiene Education 

(. andidates for the program must be graduates of accredited asso< iate degree dental 
hygiene programs and licensed as registered dental hygienists 

Students begin their course of sequenced dental h) giene courses in the I all Quarter. 

Application for admission should be completed as soon as possible. 

transfer credits are accepted tor courses other than the professional sequel 
rninimum of 45 quarter hours must be earned at Armstrong State C ollegeforthe Bachelor 
ience Degree in Dental I lygiene Education to be awarded from this institution. Ihe 
Office of the Registrar will evaluate all transfer credits. Ihe Department has a separate 
formal admissions process in addition to the admission process to Armstr 
ColK . 

I he program requires students to submit a complete health history form, evidence of 
health insurance, and evidence of liability (malpractice) insurance prior to participation 
in clinical experiences. 

Criteria for Admission 

.Admission requirements include: 

1. Dental Hygiene Licensure. 

2. One \ ear of professional experience preferred. This ma\ include am dental-related 
work experience. 

A minimum 2.0 GPA on all previous college work. Students transferring from 
another college must have this average to be considered for admission It 
average must be maintained to date of actual matriculation in the program. 

How to Apply 

1. Complete all application forms required for admission to Armstrong state Coll 

2. Complete the separate Dental Hygiene Bachelor of Science Application Form and 
return to the Department. 

3. Submit National Board Scores to the Department of Dental I lygiene. 

Associate Degree Respiratory Therapy 

See Limits on Admission to Health Professions Programs in the Admissions section oi 
this catalog. 



40 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Admission to Armstrong State College does not guarantee admission to the Respira- 
tory Therapy program. The department has a separate formal admissions process. 

Students are normally admitted to the professional component of the program in the 
fall. The application deadline is June 1. Applications received after that date will be 
considered on a space available basis. Our maximum enrollment ceiling is 20 students. 

To meet contractual obligations with our clinical affiliates, students are required to 
submit a complete health history form and evidence of health insurance and liability 
(malpractice) insurance prior to participation in clinical practicums. 

Criteria for Admission 

Admission requirements include: 

1. Regular admission to Armstrong State College. 

2. Good academic standing at the time of admission to the major. 

3. The primary criteria used to evaluate applicants are the adjusted GPA and the 
student's performance in MAT 101 and the sciences. The "cut score" for 1993 was 
on adjusted GPA of 2.40. 

Readmission to the Program 

Students who have withdrawn or been suspended from the program must apply for 
readmission. Applications must be received at least 1 quarter prior to the actual time of 
readmission. A student must be in good academic standing at the time of readmission. 

A student who has been dismissed from the program for any reason will not be eligible 
for readmission. 

Disclosure 

The curriculum is demanding and requires total commitment. During most quarters 
students are in direct contact with their instructors 25-30 hours per week. We discourage 
students from working more than 16-24 hours per week. 

Our graduate profile indicates a successful student will have an SAT score greater 
than 800 (400M, 400V) and at least 30 hours of previous college credit with a GPA of 2.4 
or higher. Students requiring more than 1 area of developmental studies are usually not 
successful. The attrition rate for a given class ranges from 30-50%. 

Associate Degree Radiologic Technologies 

See "Limits on Admission to Health Professions Programs" in the "Admissions" 
section of this catalog. 

Admission to Armstrong State College does not guarantee admission to the 
Radiologic Technologies Department. The Department has a separate formal admis- 
sions process in addition to the admission process to Armstrong State College. 

Students are normally only admitted to the professional component of the program at 
the start of the Fall Quarter each year except for transfer students. Students may begin 
taking core courses at any time but need not have completed all the core courses prior to entry 
into the professional component. The application process begins in the Fall quarter of the 
year for the next year. 

To meet contractual obligations with the clinical affiliates, the program requires 
students to submit evidence of health insurance, evidence of liability (malpractice) 
insurance, CPR certification, and a physical examination prior to participation in clinical 
education courses. 

Criteria for Admission 

The actual determination of admission of applicants to the department is a function 
of the Radiologic Technologies Program Admissions Committee. Admissions are com- 
petitive in nature and are based on scholastic history. 



ADMISSIONS 41 



I he following are specifu criteria foi admission 
I A minimum ( IP \ ol 2 i in i high m hool ^ unrk ulum 
\ minimum GPA of 2 > in all science and mathen 

^ in i u ulum 

\ minimum o\ erall adjusted i ollege GPA of 2.0 if applicable 
k minimum GPA of 2.0 in all mathematics and sciei tthecollegi 

j Must be eligible for v ollege I nglish and Vlgebra 

l heaboA e listed criteria is required, howe> n< i-tostmlrnKth.it have 

completed 20 oi more quarter hours ol degree required con and hat • 

better cumulate e < IP \ 

applicants who do not meet the criteria for admissions outlined above ma) ^till 
appl) tor admission. Please contact tin- Department for information 

\ruT admission to me Radiologic rechnolog) Department me student must . 
00 nonrefundable 1 lealth Programs I teposil to resen e a seal in me program I his 
deposit is applied to the student's first quarter matriculation fee 

Readmission to the Program 

Students who have been admitted to and have enrolled in the Associate 
Program in Radiologic rechnologies, but who have either withdrawn or been 
dismissed without prejudice from the program, may apply tor readmission to the 
program only it they have a cumulative college GPA o( 2.0 at the time the) wish to 

reenter. I he student's readmission w ill he based upon space availability and recom- 
mendation by the Radiologic Technologies Admissions Committee. 

Baccalaureate Degree Health Science 

Criteria for Admission to Program 

1 . Regular admission to Armstrong State College. 
: Eligible tor MAT 101 and ENG 101. 
i Adjusted college GPA of 2.0. 

4. Formal inten iew conducted bv health science faculty members. 

5. Completed health science program application. 

Baccalaureate Degree Medical Technology Program 

I he professional phase of the Medical Iechnolog\ curriculum begins in the 1 all 
quarter of each year with the Ml courses. Students desiring acceptance to the Medical 
technology Program should make application to the program during the earh spring 
of the preceding academic \ ear. 

Minimum Admission Requirements 

1 . SA1 of at least son with 350 or more in Math ,\nd J50 or more in Verbal. 

2. Cumulative Grade Point Average of 2.2 or more. 

3. Completion of required chemistry <.m<A biology courses prior to the senior year. 

4. Science course (Chemistry and Biology) average ol 2.25 or better with no more than 
one required science course with a grade ot I V 

5. Satisfactory completion ot Regents' resting Program. 

Other Requirements 

Per NAACLS requirement, all applicants must ha\ e taken the organic or biochemist r\ 
course and the microbiology course within the past seven years. Updating coursework 

can be done by completion (a grade of "C" or better) of the appropriate course or by a 
challenge examination. 



42 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Currently enrolled Armstrong State College students must also meet the require- 
ments for admission to the MT program and apply to the program. 

Transfer students must be accepted to the college with "Regular Status" admission. 

Certified associate degree medical laboratory technicians may receive transfer credit 
for junior level MT courses upon presentation of acceptable certification scores and/or 
transfer credit and satisfactory completion of written and /or practical examinations in 
the professional content areas. 

An applicant with B.S. degree not desiring the B.S. in Medical Technology degree must 
meet the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences academic prereq- 
uisites for Medical Technology. These students will be awarded a certificate upon 
completion of the professional coursework. 

Foreign applicants must meet the requirements for admission to Armstrong State 
College as outlined in the college catalog. 

Application Process 

1 . Complete all requirements for Application for Admission to Armstrong State College 
if not currently enrolled at ASC. 

2. Complete an Application to Medical Technology Program form. 

3. Have official transcripts sent to Program Director. 

4. If certified, have scores sent to Program Director. (Ask Program Director for form 
letter.) 

5. Applicants meeting the minimum admission requirements will be invited for an 
interview with at least two of the Admission Committee members, one of whom is the 
Program Director. 

6. Request two references to complete Confidential Appraisal Form to be forwarded to 
Program Director. 

7. All applicants will be informed by letter of their application status. 



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41 



44 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Expenses 

The following schedules list the principal expenses and regulations concerning the 
payment of fees. Fees and charges are subject to change at the end of any quarter. 

When such changes are made, notice will be given as far in advance as possible. 

Tuition 

Georgia Residents 

The matriculation fee for students registering for at least 12 quarter hours is $460.50. 
Students carrying fewer than 12 credit hours on campus in a quarter will pay $38.50 per 
quarter hour. This fee is waived for residents of Georgia upon presentation of written 
documentation that they are 62 years of age or older. 

Out-of-State Residents 

Full time students who are non-residents of Georgia pay a fee of $1,443.50. Those 
carrying fewer than 12 credit hours in a quarter pay $115.00 per quarter hour tuition. 
Out-of state tuition fees are waived for active duty military personnel and their 
dependents stationed in Georgia (except military personnel assigned to this insti- 
tution for educational purposes). 

Regents' Policies Governing Residency Requirements 

To be considered a legal resident of Georgia, the applicant must establish the following 
facts to the satisfaction of the Registrar. 

1 . (a) If a person is 18 years of age or older, he or she may register as an in-state student 
only upon a showing that he or she has been a legal resident of Georgia for a period 
of at least twelve months immediately preceding the date of registration. 

(b) No emancipated minor or other person 18 years of age or older shall be deemed 
to have gained or acquired in-state status for tuition purposes while attending any 
educational institution in this State, in the absence of a clear demonstration that he 
or she has in fact established legal residence in this State. 

2. If a person is under 1 8 years of age, he or she may register as an in-state student only 
upon a showing that his or her supporting parent or guardian has been a legal 
resident of Georgia for a period of at least twelve months immediately preceding 
the date of registration. 

3. If a parent or legal guardian of a minor changes his or her legal residence to another 
state following a period of legal residence in Georgia, the minor may continue to 
take courses for a period of twelve consecutive months on the payment of in-state 
tuition. After the expiration of the twelvemonth period, the student may continue 
his or her registration only upon the payment of fees at the out-of-state rate. 

4. In the event that a legal resident of Georgia is appointed as guardian of a 
nonresident minor, such minor will not be permitted to register as an in-state 
student until the expiration of one year from the date of court appointment, and 
then only upon a proper showing that such appointment was not made to avoid 
payment of the out-of-state fees. 

5. Aliens shall be classified as nonresident students provided, however, that an alien 
who is living in this country under an immigration document permitting indefinite 
or permanent residence shall have the same privilege of qualifying for in-state 
tuition as a citizen of the United States. 

6. Waivers: An institution may waive out-ofstate tuition for: 

(a) nonresident students who are financially dependent upon a parent, parents or 
spouse who has been a legal resident of Georgia for at least twelve consecutive 
months immediately preceding the date of registration; provided, however, 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 



th.it siu h tm.iin lal dependent »• sh.iii h.i 

tive month* lmmediatel) preceding t lu- date ition 

Internationa] students selected by the institutional president or his authoi 

re presen tative provided thai tin- numbei ol such wa 

exceed one percent ol tin- equivalent hill time students enrolled .it the msti 

tutton m the fall quarter lmmediatel) preceding the quartet foi which the 

out ol state tuition is to be waived 

full time employees ol tin- I niversit) System, then spouses, and theii 

pendent ». hildren 

(d) tull-tuiu'tr.u hereinthepublu s v hoolsoft ieorgia or in the programs ol the State 
Board I't rechnical and Adult l duration and their dependent ^ hildren i • 

its emplo) ed full-time on tnilitar) bases in ( Ieorgia sinill also qualif) for this 
wah er 

(e) career consular officers and their dependents who are < itizens ol the foreign 
nation which their consular office represents, and who are stationed and li\ my; 
in Georgia under orders ol their respective governments. I his waiver shall 
appl) onl) to those consular officers whose nations operate on tlu- print ii 
educational reciprocit) with the I rtited States 

(f) rnilitax) personnel and their dependents stationed in Georgia and on active 
dut) unless such militar) personnel are assigned as students toSj stem institu* 
tions tor educational purposes 

students who are legal residents of out-of-state counties bordering on i le 
counties in which an institution of thel niversit) System is located and who are 
enrolled in said institution. 

Residency Reclassification 

A student is responsible tor registering under the proper residency classification A 
student classified as a nonresident who believes that he she is entitled to be reclassified 
as a legal resident may petition the Registrar for a change in status I he petition must be 
tiled no later than sixty (60) days after the quarter begins in order tor the student to be 
considered for reclassification for the quarter. It the petition is granted, reclassification 
will not be retroactive to prior quarters. The necessary forms tor this purpose are 
available in the Registrar's office. 

Student Housing 

To secure housing, students must send a $100.00 deposit with their housing applica- 
tion. Refer to the housing contract for specific terms ,\nd conditions. 

The fee for double occupanc\ is $602.00 and $770.00 for single 0< CUpaiK) per quarter. 

Food Service 

All students who reside in the dormitory must purchase a 5-day, 15-meaJ plan at the 
current fee of $500.00 per quarter. 

Other Special Costs 

Application Fee $10.00 

Must accompany initial application. Acceptance oi application fee does not constitute 
acceptance of the student. Non-refundable. 

Athletic Fee $41.00 qtr. 

All students pay each quarter. 



46 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Exit Exam Fee 

Fees are announced in test bulletins. 

Graduation Fee $32.00 

Payable by each candidate for graduation when graduation application is submitted 
two quarters prior to graduation. If candidate is receiving a second degree at the same 
graduation ceremonies, an additional $5.00 is due. The full $30.00 is charged for a second 
degree awarded at a subsequent graduation ceremony. A fee of $15.00 is charged for each 

replacement diploma. 

Health Professions Deposit $50.00 

Reserves a seat in appropriate health program, payable upon application to program. 

Late Registration Fee $33.00 

Non-refundable fee charged to students who register after the registration period. 

Student Activity Fee $21 .00/qtr. 

All students pay each quarter. 

Transcript Fee, Official 1 free, $2.50 each additional 

Unofficial transcripts for academic advisement and schedule planning will be issued 
at no charge. 

Music Fees 

Applied music courses consist of one twenty-five minute private lesson per week 
(Music 130) or a fifty minute private lesson per week (Music 140, 240, 340, 440). A special 
fee of $48.00 is charged for students enrolled in Music 130. A special fee of $96.00 is 
assessed for Music 140440 to music majors enrolled for less than 12 hours and to students 
who are not music majors. Music majors may enroll, at no charge, for one applied music 
course from Music 140-440. Additional applied music courses will be assessed a special 
fee at the non-music major rate. 

The applied music fee is refundable only if the student does not meet the first 
scheduled lesson. 

Summary of Fees* 

Matriculation, per quarter $ 460.50 

Student Activity, per quarter $ 21.00 

Athletic, per quarter $ 41.00 

Total for Georgia Resident $ 522.50 

Out-of-State Tuition, per quarter $ 921.00 

Total for Non-Resident $1,443.50 

Matriculation Part-Time Students, per quarter hours $ 38.50 

Non-Resident Tuition, Part-Time Students, per quarter hour 

(in addition to Matriculation Fee) $ 77.00 

The fees shown are for the 1993-94 academic year as approved by the Board of Regents. 
Graduate fees are listed in the Graduate Catalog. 

Short Courses 

Fees are announced for each quarter when the course is scheduled by the college. 
Students who formally withdraw from a short course or conference up to twenty-four 
hours prior to the first class meeting will receive a full refund of fees paid. No refunds will 
be made for withdrawals after the first class meeting. Fees paid for courses or conferences 
cancelled bv the Coastal Georgia Center for Continuing Education will be refunded 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 47 



Refund checks will be mailed approximate!) foui 
w ithdraw al form is received h\ Ihe Business Office 

Refunds 

Refunds of tuition and fees will be made onl) upon written application foi with I 
from school in the( Office of Student Affairs No refunds will be made to students droj . 
a course Students who fonnall) w ithdraw during the registration period and the first 
oi classes are entitled to a refund oi 80% c4 the fees paid foe thai quartei Stud 
formalh w ithdraw during me second week of >. lasses are entitled to a refund of 60 <>i th»- 
fees paid tor that quarter. Students \\ ho formally w ithdraw during tin- third weekol i lasses 
are entitled to a refund of 40% ol thi> foes paid tor that quarter Students who fonnall) 
withdraw during the fourth week of classes are entitled to *i refund of 20 '■■ ol me fees paid 
tor mat quarter Students w ho w ithdraw after me fourth week oi < lasses w ill be entitled to 
no refund of an) part of tin- fees paid mat quarter, rhe refund schedule tor the Summer 
Quarter is printed in the Summer Quarter Schedule oi c lasses Students who register tor 
multiple sessions in the Summer quarter and who drop courses in am of me sessions are nt >t 
eligible for a refund since they arestill enrolled. Students who register separately fordifferent 
sessions and withdraw from aU sessions may be eligible for a partial refund depending upon 
the withdrawal date. Refund checks will be mailed approximately tour weeks after me 
withdrawal form is received by the Business ( )ffice. Students who ha\ e ( Kisses ( ancelled b) 
me College and do not substitute comparable classes will receh e refunds tor the applicable 
fees upon proper notification of the BusinessOfficeb) me Registrar's Office. Refunds are not 
issued to |ointl\ -enrolled students (those taking AS( undergraduate classes ,\nd GSl 

graduate classes) who drop a course 

Military resen ists recalled to active duty should contact the BusinessOffice for refund 

information. 

Refunds of dormitory tees And deposits will be made onlv upon approval of the 
Director of I lousing in the Office of Student Affairs. A dorm exit form must be completed 
by a dorm resident assistant or other housing official. Approved refunds will he mailed 
approximately four weeks after the exit form is received b\ the Business Office. 

Financial Obligations 

Am student delinquent in the payment of an) financial obligation to the college will 
have grade reports and transcripts o\ records encumbered. Grade reports and transcripts 
will not be released, nor will the student be allowed to register at the college until all 
financial obligations are met. 

lees tor each quarter are to be paid in full at the time of registration. 

Returned Check Policy 

students w hose checks are returned to the college unpaid bv their banks will be 
notified bv the Business Office to pay the amount due. Student checks used tor 
bookstore and other purchases will be assessed a service charge of S20.00 or 5"o of the 
check, whichever is greater. Student checks used for tuition and fees will be assessed 
the service charge plus the late registration fee. A stop payment of a check does not 
constitute a formal withdrawal and is considered a returned check. Legal means will be 
used to collect returned checks. Writing a non-sufficient funds check or stopping 
payment on a check does not cancel registration. Students whose check is returned for 
non-sufficient funds or who stop payment on a check must honor the check and pay the 
service charges before withdrawing from college. After honoring a returned or stop 
payment check and formally withdrawing in the Office of Student Affairs the student 
will receive a refund. Checks returned because oi bank errors will be redeposited after 
written notification is received by the bank and a S20.00 service charge is paid by the 
student. No late registration fee is assessed for checks returned because oi a bank error. 
Students should request reimbursement of the $20.00 service charge from their bank. 



48 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Financial Aid 
Governing Principles 

Armstrong State College subscribes to the principle that the primary purpose of a 
student financial aid program is to provide financial assistance to students who without 
such assistance would be unable to attend college. The primary responsibility for 
financing a college education is the inherent obligation of the student and /or family. 
Financial assistance from Armstrong State College should be viewed as supplementary 
to the efforts of the student and /or family. An assessment of parental ability to contribute 
toward the student's educational expenses is made according to federal guidelines so that 
neither the parent, the student, nor Armstrong State College will be required to bear an 
undue share of the financial responsibility. 

General Information 

Student financial aid is awarded to eligible students on the basis of need in nearly all 
cases except scholarships which have been provided by donors for the purpose of 
recognizing academic promise or achievement. The determination of need is pro- 
vided for Armstrong State College students through the use of the Free Application for 
Federal Student Aid. The process involves an analysis of the data provided by the 
student's family or, if independent, by the student. This analysis is sent to the Office of 
Student Financial Aid where it is compared with the cost of education for the appropriate 
classification of student. If the analysis shows that the family contribution or self 
contribution is less than the cost of education, financial need has been established. The 
Office of Student Financial Aid has the legal right to challenge information provided on 
the FAFSA if, in the opinion of the financial aid officer, that information appears to be 
inaccurate, incorrect, or misleading. 

In general, students who enter the College at the beginning of the Fall Quarter have 
a greater opportunity to receive financial assistance than those who enter later in the 
academic year. The awards processing time usually runs from May 1 to August 31. It is 
during this period that the Office of Student Financial Aid distributes its yearly allocation 
of funds to students who have completed the process cycle. Many types of assistance are 
awarded to the neediest students who apply first. In the event that there is a shortage of 
funds, students who are eligible for financial aid but whose applications were late will be 
placed on awaiting list until such time as funds become available. 

The Financial Aid Office is very interested in helping you find ways to finance your 
education. The application and awards process, however, is heavily regulated by federal 
and state law and as a result does not always proceed at a quick pace. Please keep in mind 
that although we are here to help you, we are not responsible for delays caused by 
inaccurate or incomplete applications and files. Unless your file is complete, correct, and 
unemcumbered at least a month prior to registration day each quarter, you should be 
prepared to pay your own fees. 

Students are eligible to apply for financial assistance provided that: (1) the student 
meets the requirements pertinent to the program(s) from which assistance is sought; 
and (2) the student has been admitted to the college or is enrolled in good standing and 
is making satisfactory academic progress. Graduate students should apply for assis- 
tance through Georgia Southern. Students who are classified as Transient, Continuing 
Education, or Exchange are not eligible for financial aid. Students are required to 
adhere to all regulations and requirements of the program from which they receive 
assistance and to notify the Office of Financial Aid of any change in status which may 
affect their eligibility for aid. 









FINANCIAL INFORMATION 



Application Information 

\n applicant foi student financial aid must 

1 Be enrolled or accepted for enrollment at Vrn 

2 Obtain, complete, and submit al ^PSAbyMaylprecedin 

ibmil .1 Studenl Vid Report to the ( Office ol Student I inaru ial Kid 
preceding the next a< ademi< yeai 
ompletean Armstrong Application for Financial Aid 

»ubmit a cop) oi the studenl sand parent's (it dependent) Income Tax returns from 
the pre> ious year it requested. 
it tna) be net essai j to complete additional tonus depending on a student b 
s,. hool. major course of study, and or eligibility for a particular program Vpplu .it ions 
for finaiK ial assistance must be repeated annual)) Most student financ ial aid awards are 
for the entire academi< year, with payments made to tho student in equal quarterl) 
installments 

1 he minimum number ol quarter hours for which a student financial aid rn ipient may 
enroll per quarter varies from program to program. Some require at least 12 hours per 
quarter (full-time status). Main programs require that the student be enrolled at least 
half-time, taking 6 or more quarter hours. 

Students applying for financial aid, whether eligible or not, who o\o not meet or adhere 
to the abo> e requirements will not be considered for financial aid. It is the responsibilit) 
of the parents and or student to determine that all pertinent information and data ha\ e 
been obtained and are located in the Office ol Student Financial Aid to assure a complete 
and accurate aw arding ol finan< ial assistance. 

When the student has delivered the Student .Aid Report (SAR) and the Armstrong 
Application tor 1 manual Aid. the 1 Office ot Student Financial .Aid will send the student 
a tentativ e award notice. 

Transfer Students 

In addition to the above requirements tor all financial aid students, transfer students 
are required to submit a complete 1 inancial Aid I ranscript from the financial aid office 
ot each institution oi higher education previousl) attended whether or not aid was 
received. No awards will be made until these documents have been received b) the Office 
ot Student Financial Aid. 

Types of Aid 

Grants — Awards that students are not required to repay. 

Federal Pell Grants are based on need. Tell C.rants are awarded to eligible under- 
graduate students. 

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (SEOG) are awarded to 
undergraduates w ho exhibit exceptional financial need. 

Georgia Student Incentive Grants are state grants awarded to full-time undergradu- 
ate students who are legal residents of Georgia. 

HOPE (Helping Outstanding Pupils Educationally) is Georgia's new program that 
rewards exemplary performance in high school with tuition scholarships at Georgia 
public colleges. To be eligible a student must have the following qualifications: 

• Be a graduate of a Georgia high school in 1993 or later. 

• Earn at least a "B" average (at least a 3.0 cumulative grade-point a\ erage on a 4.0 
scale in a college preparatory track, 3.2 for all other curriculum tracks). 

• For 1993 graduates, demonstrate that your family had an adjusted gross income oi 
less than $66,000 for the previous calendar year. An annual family income limit ot 
$100,000 has been proposed for 1994 and later graduates. 

Students may also be able to renew their scholarship for their sophomore vear. Check 
with the Financial Aid Office for additional information. 



50 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Loans — Money that students borrow and repay with either cash or service. 2.0 G.P.A. 
required. 

Federal Stafford Loans are available through local lending institutions and state 
agencies. Repayment begins after the student leaves school. 

Georgia Service-Cancellable Guaranteed Student Loans are offered for certain 
"critical" health and teaching fields. These loans are repaid by service in Georgia after 
graduation. 

Federal Supplemental Loans for Students are available to independent students 
regardless of need. Students in the first and second year of an academic program may 
borrow up to $4,000/year. Students who have completed the first and second year of an 
academic program but who have not completed their program of undergraduate study 
may borrow up to $5,000/year. 

Federal PLUS Loans are available to parents of dependent students. Parents may 
borrow up to the cost of education minus the estimated financial assistance that a student 
will receive. 

Institutional Short-term Loans are available to students for a maximum of 60 days. 
These loans are used primarily to assist students with the payment of tuition and fees. 
These loans are available to eligible students for a maximum of $300. Other require- 
ments concerning short-term loans are available in the Office of Student Financial Aid. 

Employment 

The Federal College Work Study Program provides on-campus employment for 
eligible undergraduate students. These awards are based on need. 

Institutional Work Study positions are offered on a limited basis to students with 
specific skills. These awards are not based on need. 

Scholarships 

The following list includes many of the scholarships available to Armstrong students. 
This listing is intended for reference only and is not an exhaustive source of all funds 
available. 

ASC Alumni Association Scholarship: Open to all full-time students. Participation 
in civic and campus organizations, financial need, and academic standing are considered. 

Scholarships include full and partial awards and applications are available each 
winter quarter for awards made in the spring. Scholarships include The Arthur M. 
Gignilliat Entering Freshman Scholarship, The Judge Grady & Sara M. Memorial Schol- 
arship, Class of 1937 Scholarship and others. For more information on specific scholarship 
criteria, contact the Office of Alumni Affairs. 

Savannah Jaycees: Full scholarship for full-time Chatham County residents. Civic 
and community involvement, financial need and academic standing are considered. For 
additional information, contact the Financial Aid Office. 

American Assn. of University Women: Open to older women in non-traditional 
fields with a 3.0 GPA, who are Chatham County residents. For additional information, 
contact the Financial Aid Office. 

Billy Bond Memorial Scholarship: Open to all students with 3.0 GPA. Civic and 
community involvement are considered. For additional information, contact the Finan- 
cial Aid Office. 

Elizabeth Wilmot Bull Scholarship: Offered by the Council on Auxiliaries of the 
Georgia Hospital Association. Students in the two and four year nursing programs who 
are Georgia residents are eligible to apply. For additional information, contact the 
Financial Aid Office. 

Chemistry & Physics Faculty Scholarship: Open to all students. Academic standing 
is considered. For additional information, contact the Chemistry & Physics Department. 

Civitan Club of Savannah Scholarship: Open to all students with a documented 
handicap or disability (to include learning disabilities). Students planning careers 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 51 



working with the disabled will also be considered ( ontact the Financial MdOffio 
more information 

Rota i t lark Scholarship; I till time student in.ii.Mim-, in Political Science with an 
overall I.OGPA or entering freshman with 1 200 SA1 For additional information, contact 
Professoi ( iross l i i^tt »i \ 1 tepartmenl 

t oopei Scholarship: Open to all undergraduate females and majoi (except 
theolog) and medi( ine) based on financial need Requires Bavei ood stand 

Application deadline April 15 For additional information, contact l irst I nion Bank 

\st i ngineering Society Scholarship: Full time sophomore and junior engineei 
students 2 75 GP \ and active membei ol I ngineering Society Poi additional infoi 
bon conta< t the c hemistr) & Physics I tepartmenl 

\sc I reshmen I ngineering S< holarship: I ntering freshmen w ith engineering ma 
joi l oi aJJition.il information, contact me ( hemistr) & Ph) bm s I department 

Coastal Empire Pathology Services Scholarship: Full-time Medical rechno 
senior For additional information, contact the w Medical rechnolog) Department 

c libson/Hamilton Memorial Scholarship: Sponsored by the c andler f lospital Aux- 
iliary Students in the allied medical field who have at leasts J.0< 1PA are eligible to appl) 
For additional information, contact the Financial Aid Office 

Curtis G. Hames Nursing Scholarship: BS\ \ursing scholarship for full-time junior, 
senior, and graduate students with C or higher average. Residents of Southeast ( Georgia. 
Financial need is considered. For additional information, contact Georgia Southern 
College l oundation, Inc. 

Sarah Mills Hodge Memorial Scholarship: Awarded to full-time Chatham C ount) 
students tor scholastic merit. Requires 5.0 ( 1PA. For additional information, contact me 
Financial Aid Offu e 

Memorial Medical Center Auxiliary Nursing Scholarship: AD\ or BSN. Georgia 
resident with 2.5 high school GPA and ♦ 750 SA1 scores. It already a nursing student, 
must have at least 2.5 GPA. For additional information, contact Memorial Medical 
Center. 

Kiwanis Memorial Educational Fund: Full-time entering freshmen I [igh achievers. 
1 or additional information, contact Office oi Admissions. 

Menzel-Magnus Award for Scholarship In Criminal Justice: Awarded to Criminal 
Justice senior with highest academic average, lor additional information, contact the 
Department ot Government. 

Paderewski Scholarship/Loan Program: Dental Hygiene. Must be Georgia resident 
Financial need is considered. For additional information, contact the Dental Hygiene 
Department. 

Savannah Foods and Industries Engineering Scholarship: Awarded to engineering 
students with demonstrated academic potential. Contact the Director oi Engineering 
Studies. 

Savannah Pathology Laboratory Scholarship: Full-time Medical technology senior. 
For additional information, contact the ASC Medical Technology Department. 

Anthony Porter Scholarship: Academic standing, civic c\nd community invoh ement 
are considered. For additional information, contact the Financial Aid Office. 

Savannah Scholarship for Radiologic Technologists: Full-time freshman or sopho- 
more Radiologic Technology major with 2.0GPA. For additional information, contact the 
Radiologic Technology Department. 

Solomon's Lodge: Full-time students in top 30".. of class and 900 SAT. Civic and 
community involvement and financial need are considered. For additional information, 
contact Solomon's Lodge No. 1. 

Regents Scholarship: Georgia residents in the top 23". > of their class. For additional 
information, contact the Financial Aid Office. 

Rotary Club of Savannah Scholarship: Full-time students with 3.0 GPA. For addi- 
tional information, contact the Financial Aid Office. 



52 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Savannah Volunteer Guards Scholarship: Full-time freshmen with high school GPA 
of 3.0 and 1000 SAT. Recipient must take three quarters of military science for duration 
of scholarship. For additional information, contact the Financial Aid Office. 

Ty Cobb Scholarship: Students must have completed 45 hours with B average and be 
Georgia residents. For additional information, contact the Financial Aid Office. 

Wine & Spirits Wholesalers of Georgia Scholarship Foundation: Full-time students, 
academic standing (3.0 GPA), civic and community involvement and financial need are 
considered. For additional information, contact the Financial Aid Office. 

WOW - Women of Worth: Full-time student who is an active WOW member. For 
additional information, contact the Psychology Department. 

Government Benefits 

Social Security provides monthly benefits to children when a parent dies, starts 
receiving Social Security retirement, or starts receiving disability benefits. Because of 
changes in the law, students should contact the Social Security Office concerning 
eligibility. 

The Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Program provides financial assistance for the 
applicant who possesses an impairment which would prove to be a vocational handicap. 
Students who think that they may qualify under this program should contact the 
Vocational Rehabilitation Center. Applicants sponsored by Vocational Rehabilitation or 
other community agencies must apply at least six weeks before the beginning of any 
quarter to insure proper processing of applications. 

Veterans Benefits 

V. A. Educational Benefits may be used for study at Armstrong. Contact the Veterans 
Affairs Representative in the Registrar /Admissions Office for specific instructions on 
application procedures. 

Satisfactory Academic Progress 

The Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended by Congress in 1980, mandates that 
institutions of higher education establish minimum standards of "satisfactory progress" 
for students receiving financial aid. To receive financial aid at Armstrong, a student must 
both maintain a satisfactory grade point average and be making satisfactory academic 
progress as outlined below. These requirements apply to the following programs: Pell 
Grant, Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, College Work Study, Guaranteed 
Student Loans, PLUS Loans, Georgia Incentive Grant, and other State Student Incentive 
Grants. 

It is the student's responsibility to read and understand Armstrong's policy regarding 
Standards of Academic Progress. Failure to understand and adhere to these policies will 
result in a student's ineligibility for aid. 
(1 ) Students must earn the following minimum number of hours each academic year fall 

through spring quarters) depending upon their enrollment status: 

(a) Full-time students - 36 hrs. per academic year (12 hrs per quarter) 

(b) 3/4 time students - 27 hrs. per academic year (9 hrs. per quarter) 

(c) 1 /2 time students - 18 hrs. per academic year (6 hrs. per quarter) 

(d) Less than 1/2 time students must satisfactorily complete all coursework they 
attempt. 

Students whose enrollment status varies during the year should follow the 
quarterly requirements listed above. For example, a student who enrolls full-time 
the first two quarters but only 3/4 the third quarter would be required to complete 
33 hours (12 + 12 + 9 = 33). 

Student records will be checked for compliance prior to the beginning of each new 
academic year. Students who are not meeting the above requirements will be con- 
sidered ineligible for further aid until the appropriate number of hours are earned. 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 53 



i, irade ol \ B,< D, aiui P wiU be considered as credits earned I I \\ WF, and 
l will not be considered as credits earned 

students who are enrolled hill time will be expected to complete theii thin 

five yean Nostudenl will be eligible foi aid it heoi she has attempt) 
more Students are therefore cautioned against repeating too in.nu umrsrs 

n addition to earning an appropriate number ol houj rudenta must 

maintain a grade point a> erage thai pla< es mem In good standing a< * ording to the 
academk policies ol Armstrong State ( olleg 
( Iraduate students must maintain a I ( !PA to remain eligible for aid 

Students who are enrolled in the Developmental Studies program will follow* the 
regulations ol mat program Students will be required to meet .ill Satisfactory 
;ress regulations upon completing the requirement of the Developmental Studies 
Program Suspension from Developmental Studies makes .1 student ineligible t<>r 
further aid 

ransfer students must be in good standing to receh e the initial disbursement ol aid 
c redit hours attempted at other institutions will be considered in the 22^ hour 
maximum. Other Satisfactory Progress calculations will consider only the student's 
academic re< ord at Armstrong State Colli 

Reinstatement of Aid 

I he reinstatement ol aid is dependent on the availability of funds. 
(l)Students whose aid is terminated because the) tailed to earn the required number of 

hours may request their aid he reinstated once they earn the required number of hours. 
1 hese hours must be earned at Armstrong ^no\ may be earned during the summer or 
during the following year. The student is not eligible for aid during these "catch up" 
quarters. 

udents whose aid is terminated due to insufficient GPA or standing may request 
their aid be reinstated once they have attended at least one quarter at full-time status 
and receive at least a 2.0 GPA. I he student must also meet the GPA requirements listed 
abo\ e. 

Appeal of Aid Suspension 

Students who feel that they can demonstrate mitigating circumstances which affected 
their academic progress may make an appeal to the W'^n of .Academic And Enrollment 
Sen ices 



54 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 





i 



^ 



A> . 




I 




- 
I 



56 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Academic Advisement 

All students are required to participate in the advisement system at Armstrong State 
College. The Vice President and Dean of Faculty gives overall direction to the advisement 
program, with the appropriate department heads coordinating advisement activities 
with the various departments. Academic advisement is available as follows: 

1) The Advisement Center - Second floor, Lane Library 

* All undecided majors 

* All students with CPC deficiencies in science, social science, or foreign language. 

* Please come to the Advisement Center for an appointment. 

2) The Developmental Studies Office — Memorial Center Annex 

* All students with CPC deficiencies in math and English. 

* All students currently enrolled in a Developmental Studies class. 

* Please come to the Developmental Studies Department to make an appointment 
for advisement. 

3) Departmental Offices 

* All students who have declared a major or who have selected a pre-professional 
program. 

* Appointments are to be made with departmental advisors. 

English Composition and Mathematics Requirements 

See English Composition and Mathematics Requirements in the Degree Requirements 
Section of this catalog, where important requirements are outlined for entering students. 

State Requirement in History and Government 

See State Requirement in History and Government in the Degree Requirements 
Section of this catalog. 

Course and Study Load 

The normal course load for full-time students is 15-18 quarter hours including a course 
in physical education during the freshman and sophomore years. 

A full-time student is defined as one who is registered for 12 or more hours. A 
part-time student is one registered for fewer than 12 quarter hours. A student should 
plan about ten hours preparation per week for each 5 quarter hour course. 

Classification of Students 

A student who has earned fewer than 45 quarter hours will be classified as a freshman; 
between 45 and 89 a sophomore; between 90 and 134 as a junior; and 135 or more as a 
senior. 

Overloads and Courses at Other Colleges 

Permission to enroll for more than 18 quarter hours will be granted by the Registrar 
to a student: 

1 . with an average grade of "B" for full-time enrollment in the preceding quarter, or 

2. with an overall grade-point average of 3.0 or 

3. requiring an extra course in one of the two quarters prior to graduation. 

No student will be allowed to register for more than 21 quarter hours. A student who 
is on academic probation will not be permitted to register for more than 18 quarter hours. 
Exceptions to these limitations may be made only by the appropriate Dean. 

A student enrolled at Armstrong who at the same time takes courses for credit at 
another college may not transfer such credit to Armstrong, unless written permission 
from the appropriate Dean has been obtained. 






ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION 57 



Grade Reports 

Grade reports are issued direct!) toNtiulriUs.it theendofeachquartei l he folio* 
lesare used in tlu- determination of grade point averages 

mU Hanoi Points 

\ (excellent) 
B (good) 
( (satisfactory) 

D (passing) 1.0 

1 (failu 

w l (withdrew failinj 0.0 

I he cumulath e ( .i' \ is determined b) dh iding tlu- total honor points earned b) tin- 
total hours attempted .it Armstrong State c ollege. I he adjusted i »PA is determined b) 
Ji\ iding the total honor points earned b) thetotaJ hours attempted, with hours and honor 
points for repeated courses not duplicated in the calculation. 

Armstrong State << ollege also uses the following symbols foi grade reports, rhese 
symbols carry no honor points and are not included in the determination ol either 
the cumulath e GPA or me adjusted GPA. 

Symbol / xplanation 

\\ withdrew, no penalt) 

I in progress or incomplete 

S satisfactory 

l unsatisfactory 

V audit 

K credit by examination 

P passing 

\I\ not reported 

An "I" which has not been removed b) the middle of the succeeding quarter is 
changed to ,\n "1" unless the instructor recommends an extension in writing addressed 
to the appropriate Dean. I he "S" and "I " symbols may be utilized tor completion of 
degree requirements other than academic course work (such as student teaching, clinical 
practice, etc. i. \ "WF" (Withdrew, Failing) is recorded foranystudenl withdrawing after 
the mid-term date. Exceptions to this policy must be approved by the Dean of the School 
in which the course is taught and will be approved only on the basis ot hardship. .Appeals 
for a change ot grade may be initiated through the head ot the appropriate academic 
department in accordance with the Regulations of Armstrong State College 

Grade Appeals 

A student who contests a grade will have the following line ot' appeal: 

1. The student will discuss the contested grade with the instructor involved. 

2. If the grade dispute remains unresolved, the student will meet with the department 
head i\nd the instructor. If the grade dispute is with the department head, the 
student will meet with the dean of the school and the department head. A 
"memorandum tor the record" will be prepared which will include the substance 
of the conversations during the meeting. 

3. If the grade dispute remains unresolved, the student will present his or her appeal 
in writing to the department head or the dean ot the school, as applicable, who will 
then appoint a review board to hear the appeal. The student will initiate this step 
prior to midterm of the quarter after the grade was received (except it the student 
plans enrollment in a course for which the course grade being appealed is a 
prerequisite — see "4" below). 

a. The review board will consist oi the department head or the dean oi the school, 
as applicable, and two members of the department, not including the instructor 
involved. In small departments, membership may come from outside the 
department. 



58 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



b. I he review board shall hear statements from both the student and the instructor 
involved and will examine documents that are pertinent to the matter under 
review. 

c. The review board will hear the grade appeal and present its findings to the vice 
president and dean of faculty prior to the last week of the quarter. 

4. If the student plans enrollment in a course for which the course grade being 
appealed is a prerequisite, then the following timetable will be met at the first of 
that quarter: 

a. If a grade appeal is not resolved with the instructor concerned, then the student 
will file an appeal in writing with the department head (or the dean of the school 
if the grade dispute is with the department head). This step will be taken by the 
second day of the quarter. 

b. The review board to hear the appeal will be appointed by the third day of the 
quarter. If department members are not available to form a review board, the 
dean of the school, in consultation with the department head, will appoint a 
review board. 

c. The review board will hear and complete the grade appeal by the fifth day of the 
quarter, and present its findings to the vice president and dean of faculty. 

d. If the appeal to the vice president and dean of faculty is denied, the student will 
be disenrolled from the course in question. 

5. If the vice president and dean of faculty denies the appeal, the student mav 
continue the appeal to the president. 

6. The Board of Regents will not accept or consider appeals based on academic grades. 

Honors 

Dean's List: Students enrolled for at least ten quarter hours of course work who earn 
an honor point average of at least 3.6 will be placed on the Dean's List. Only course work 
taken at Armstrong will be used in the computation of Dean's List honors. 

Cum Laude: Those students graduating with an honor point average of 3.2 through 
3.499 will be graduated cum laude. 

Magna Cum Laude: Those students graduating with an honor point average of 3.5 
through 3.799 will be graduated magna cum laude. 

Summa Cum Laude: Those students graduating with an honor point average of 3.8 
through 4.0 will be graduated summa cum laude. 

All work attempted at Armstrong and other accredited institutions will be considered 
in computing honors for graduation. 

Attendance 

The control of student attendance at class meetings and the effect of attendance on the 
grades in a course are left to the discretion of the instructor. 

A student is responsible for knowing everything that is announced, discussed, or 
lectured upon in class as well as for mastering all assigned reading. A student is also 
responsible for submitting on time all assignments and tests, recitations and unan- 
nounced quizzes. 

The instructor will be responsible for informing each class at its first meeting what 
constitutes excessive absence in that particular class. Each student is responsible for 
knowing the attendance regulation and for complying with it. An instructor may drop a 
student from any class with a grade of "W" or "WF," as appropriate, if in the instructor's 
judgment the student's absences have been excessive. 

Academic Standing 

The college recognizes four academic categories: Good Standing, Good Standing with 
Warning, Academic Probation, and Academic Suspension. Students are expected to 
maintain or exceed the grade point average (GPA) as indicated in the chart below. 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION 59 



On. n kei I louts Attempted 


Required \J|ust 


.it Armstrong .uui I Item hot 


GP \ 






11 




61 


l 9 


ov< • 





\ student who falls beta* tin- required GPA foi me first time is placed on i 
Standings ith Warning I ailure to raise the adjusted < IPAtothe required level durinj 
next quarter will result in Vcademu Probation. Students on Academii Probation are not 
in( lood Standing It thestudenl s adjusted ( IP A is raised to the required level, the student 
is returned to( »ood Standing I he second 01 an) subsequent failure to meet me required 
GPA will result in Academic Probation m order to parti< ipate in extra urri< ularacth itu-s 
endorsed b\ me college students must be in Good Standing or c.nod Standing with 
Warning Students under warning should plan both auricular and extracurricular 
acth ities under the guidance ot meir .k!\ isors 

Students on Academic Probation who fail to achieve me required adjusted GPA, 
hut who do earn an average ot at least 2.0 during me probationary quarter, will be 
continued on Academic Probation tor the next quarter ol attendance. Students on 
demic Probation who neither achieve me required adjusted GPA nor earn at least 
average during me probationary quarter will be placed on Academic Suspension 
from the college tor <mv quarter. A student on .Academic Suspension tor the first time 
has the option ot attending summer school without having to appeal the suspension. 
However a student who tails to make satisfactory progress as a result ot summer 
school will have to appeal tor readmission in the tall quarter. Other than this one 
exception (attending summer school without having to appeal the suspension), students 
must submit a written appeal in order to be considered tor readmission. 

A student suspended tor academic reasons tor the first or second time may appeal 
b\ letter to the Committee on Academic Standing to be considered tor readmission. I his 
letter should state the nature ot ^n\ extenuating circumstances relating to the academic 
deficiency, and must be delivered to the office ot the [\\m ot Academic and Enrollment 
Sen ices no later than 9 AM of registration day. The Committee on Academic Standing 
will make a recommendation to the President ^nd the decision of the President is final 

\ student re-entering the college after an Academic Suspension is placed on Academic 
Probation and must meet the requirements listed above. A third Academic Suspension 
is final. 

Repeating Courses 

Any course may be repeated with the last grade to be counted in the adjusted GPA A 
student who repeats any course should complete a "Notice of Course Repetition" form 
available in the Office of the Registrar. 

Dropping Courses 

A student desiring to drop a course after the quarter has begun must obtain a 
Drop-Add Notice in the Office of the Registrar. The notice must be signed by the 
instructor of the course being dropped and returned by the student to the Office of the 
Registrar. 

A student who drops a course within the first seven days will receive a grade of "\\ 
for the course. A student who drops a course after the first seven class days and on or 
before the quarterly dates listed tor mid-terms will receive a "\V" or a "\\T" depending 
on the status in the course. A student who drops a Developmental Studies course after the 
first seven class days will receive a " L ". A student may not drop a course without penalty 
following the quarterly dates listed for mid-term. A student is not allowed to drop ENG 
025, 101, 102, or 201 at any time unless extenuating circumstances pre\ail. In order to drop 



60 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



one of these courses, the drop form must be authorized by the Dean of the School of Arts 
and Sciences or a designated representative. 

A Developmental Studies student who withdraws or is withdrawn from a Develop- 
mental Studies course will also be dropped from all five or more credit hour courses he/ 
she is taking that are numbered 101 or above. The student may, however, remain enrolled 
in other Developmental Studies courses and in courses carrying fewer than five credit 
hours. 

Withdrawing from College 

Any student who finds it necessary to withdraw from college must begin the process 
in the Office of Student Affairs. A formal withdrawal is required to ensure that the 
student is eligible to return to Armstrong State College at a future date. Any refund to 
which a student is entitled will be considered on the basis of the date which appears on 
the withdrawal form. Dropping all courses is considered withdrawing from college. 
Grading policies for withdrawing from college are the same as listed for dropping a 
course. 

Involuntary Withdrawal 

A student may be administratively withdrawn from the college when in the judgment 
of Vice President of Student Affairs and the college physician, if any, and after consulta- 
tion with the student's parents and personal physician, if any, it is determined that the 
student suffers from a physical, mental, emotional or psychological health condition 
which: (a) poses a significant danger or threat of physical harm to the student or to the 
person or property of others or (b) causes the student to interfere with the rights of other 
members of the college community or with the exercise of any proper activities or 
functions of the college or its personnel or (c) causes the student to be unable to meet 
institutional requirements for admission and continued enrollment, as defined in the 
student conduct code and other publications of the college. 

Except in emergency situations, a student shall, upon request, be accorded an 
appropriate hearing prior to final decision concerning his or her continued enroll- 
ment at the college. 

Auditing Courses 

A regular student wishing to audit a course without receiving credit must obtain 
permission of the instructor before registering for the course. During the registration 
process the student should request to audit. A student may not change from audit to 
credit status or from credit to audit status after completing the process of registration 
for a course. A student who audits a course will have a "V" recorded for that course. 
The regular schedule of fees applies to auditors. Unauthorized auditing is prohibited. No 
student may audit a Developmental Studies course. 

Honor Code 

The Honor Code at Armstrong State College is dedicated to the proposition that the 
protection of the grading system is in the interest of the student community. The 
Student Court is an institutional means to assure that the student community shall have 
primary disposition of infractions of the Honor Code and that students accused of such 
infractions shall enjoy those procedural guarantees traditionally considered essential to 
fair and impartial hearing, the foremost of which is the presumption of innocence until 
guilt be established beyond a reasonable doubt. 
I. Responsibilities of students: 

All students must agree to abide by the rules of the Honor Code. A student shall not 

be accepted at Armstrong State College unless he or she signs a statement affirming 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION 



his understanding of tl men! rheHonoi ( ode shall be printed in the of ficial 

bulletin and Studi nts 

It will be the responsibility of the Student Court or il ited repn 

to conduct an orientation program al the beginning o( each quarter i«" .ill 
entei ing students to explain full) the Honor ( ode and to allow lull Jim ussion <>t its 
requirements 

\m student desiring assistance with an) mattei related to the Honoi ( ode is 
m\ ited to seek assistance in the < HHt e ot Student Vffairs 
II \ iolationa ol the Honoi ( ode: 

\ iolationsot tin- Honoi c ode ma) in- ol two kinds eraland (b) those related 

to the peculiarities o( specifi< course related problems and to me understand 
nuli\ idual instnu tors Am instrw tot w hose conception oi i heating would tend to 
enlarge or contract me general regulations defining < heating must explicit!) notify the 
affected students ol the qualifications to the general regulations u hi< h In- or sin- wishes 
to stipulate I he folio* ing w ill be considered general \ iolations ot the I lonor c ode 
l Giving or receiving any unauthorized help on an) assignment, test or paper, rhe 

meaning ot unauthorized help shall be made < lear b) the instnu tor ot each < lass 
2. Stealing when related to cheating. 
) Plagiarizing. Plagiarism is the unacknowledged use ot another's words or ideas 

Students must be familiar w ith the explanation ot plagiarism given in the writing 

handbook used in freshman composition classes (pp. ^22 in the current text, 

Writing: A College Handbook, Heffernan and I incoln, 1986) Ignorance of what 

constitutes plagiarism will not be accepted as an excuse for plagiarism. 
4 t .i\ ing perjured testimony before the Student Court. 

Suborning, attemption to suborn, or in intimidating witnesses 

! ailing to report a suspected \ iolation ot the I lonor C ode. 

III. Reporting Violations of the Honor Code: 

Anyone wishing to report a violation may come to the Office ot Student Affairs for 

assistance in contacting members ot the Student Court. 

\ Self-reporting: Students who have broken the Honor Code should report them- 
selves to a member ot the Student Court. 

B. Anyone (facult) member or student) w ho is aware ot a violation of the I lonor Code 
must report the matter. 

1. Tell persons thought to be guilty to report themselves to a member of the 
Student Court no later than the end of the next school d^\ . After this designated 
time the person w ho is aware of the violation must inform a member of the 
Student Court SO that the Student Court may contact the accused persons it the) 
have not already reported themseh 

2. Report the suspected violation directly to a member of the Student Court 
without informing the accused. 

IV. The procedural rights of the students accused of violations of the Honor Code: 

The essence of the procedural rights of the accused is the right to be presumed 
innocent until proven guilty. Specific rights are as follows: 

1. The accused will be notified in writing by the Student Court or its designated 
representative of the nature and details of the offense with which they are charged 
a\on^ with the names of their accusers and the principal witnesses to be brought 
against them. This notification shall occur no less than three days prior to the date 
of the hearing. 

2. The accused has the right to counsel of their own choosing. Such counsel will not 
participate directly in the proceedings except to advise the client. It is expected that 
such counsel will be drawn from the college community. 

3. The accused and the person bringing the charges shall be afforded an opportunity 
to present witnesses and documentary or other evidence. The accused and any 
individual bringing the charges shall have the right to cross examine all wirn- 
and may, where the witnesses cannot appear because of illness or other cause 



62 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



acceptable to the Court, present the sworn statement of the witnesses. The Court 
shall not be bound by formal rules governing the presentation of evidence, and it 
may consider any evidence presented which is of probative value in the case. 

4. The accused may not be made to bear witness against themselves. The Court may 
not take the refusal of the accused to testify as evidence of guilt, but this proviso 
does not give the accused immunity from a hearing or from recommendations 
reached in a hearing simply because the accused does not testify. 

5. The accused shall have access to a complete audiotape of the hearing and to the 
record prepared by the secretary. 

6. The substantive facts of a case may be re-opened for consideration upon initiation 
of the accused acting through normal appeal channels. The accused shall not be put 
in double jeopardy. 

7. All witnesses will be sequestered from the hearing room during the course of a 
hearing. Witnesses may not discuss a pending case. 

8. By prior agreement, the accused will be allowed such observers of the hearing as 
may be commensurate with the space available. Otherwise, in the interests of the 
right of privacy of the accused, hearings will be private, except that the College may 
also have observers additional to the advisors to the Student Court. 

The Student Conduct Committee, the Student Court and Advisors to the Student 
Court: 

A. Student Conduct Committee 

1 . The Student Conduct Committee shall be responsible to the faculty for recom- 
mending policies relating to the Academic Honor Code and the Code of 
Conduct, for formulating or approving rules, enforcement procedures, and 
sanctions within the framework of existing policies, and for recommending 
changes in the administration of any aspects of the Honor Code and the Student 
Code of Conduct. The Conduct Committee will also interview and select 
members for the Student Court. 

2. The Committee shall consist of five teaching faculty members, the Vice Presi- 
dent of Student Affairs and four students. The four students will be the 
President and Vice President of the Student Court, the President of the Student 
Government Association, and one student-at-large. The faculty members shall 
be appointed by the faculty in accordance with the faculty statutes. 

3. The Vice President of Student Affairs shall assist the Conduct Committee in the 
development of policy and in the discharge of its responsibilities. He or she shall 
coordinate the activities of all officials, committees, student groups, and tribu- 
nals for student conduct. 

4. All regulations or rules relating to student conduct that are proposed by any 
College official, committee or student group, and for which sanctions may be 
imposed in the name of the College, must be submitted to the Committee for 
consideration and review prior to submission to the faculty and the student 
body. The Committee shall have 10 days in which to review the same. 

B. Student Court 

1 . The Student Court will be selected by the Student Conduct Committee and will 
be composed of twelve students. Due consideration will be given to equitable 
apportionment of court members on the basis of academic class, race, and sex. 
Students on academic probation may not serve. All appointments will be issued 
and accepted in writing. Appointments will be made during Spring Quarter in 
time for newly elected members of the Court to assume their duties by May 1. 
Appointments will be made as needed to keep the Student Court staffed to do 
business on a reasonably prompt basis. These appointments may constitute 
permanent or temporary replacements as the Student Conduct Committee 
deems necessary. 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION 63 



rhe Student ( ourt will elect a Presidenl \ ice President, and a Se< retai 
membership rhe President will preside at all meetings rhe Vice President will 
assume tin' duties ol the President it the President 
maintain written notes ol .ill proceedings and audiotape 
nn'in and will maintain exhibits i>t evidence which b) thru nature may 
reasonably be maintained in the ( ourt Mies V quorum of the < ourt shall < 
of seven members \ two thirds majorit) secret ballot vote is required to 
a rinding of guilt) Ulothei questions may bede< idedb) a simple majorit) vote 
( onstituen< \ of the Student ( ourt during the Summei Qua] tei shall in* lude .ill 
appointed members in attendance/ and others shall be appointed to membei 
ship b) the Student ^ ondu< t c ommitti 
\ Student Court members shall examine their consciences < arefull) to determine 
w hether the) caningoodcons< ience serve on a panel hearing .1 partii ulai 
and in thee\ ent that there is an) doubt whatsoever, such members shall excuse 
themseh es from dut) on the spe< iflc panel in question. 
( \J\ isors to me Court 

1. An ad\ isor and an associate advisor to the Student C ourt shall be appointed b) 
the Presidenl ol the C ollege. 

2. Qrdinaril) the ad \ isor will serve in that office for one yearonl) and usually will 
be succeeded in that position by the associate ad\ isor. I hereiore, after the initiaJ 
appointments, onl) an assoc iatead\ isor will ordinaril) be appointed ea< h year, 
l he succession ol an associate to the advisor position is deemed to o< cui on the 
List day ol Spring Quarter, it, for any reason, the advisor is unable to complete 
his or her term, the associate <kK isor shall succeed to the office ol ad> isor and 
another associate advisor shall be appointed b) the above procedures, [f, during 
the Summer Quarter, neither ad> isor is on c ampus, a temporary advisor v\ 1 11 be 
appointed. 

v Duties ol the advisor ^nd the associate advisor: It shall- be the duty of the 

advisor to consult with the Court and to otter advice to the President and 

members of the Court on substantive and procedural questions. 1 he adi isor, or 
the associate advisor in thee\ ent the advisor is unable to attend, shall be present 
at all meetings ^^d hearings of the Court, rhe advisor may not vote or 

participate directly in the conduct at hearings before the Court except through 
the chair, or acting chair, of the Court. The advisor should be governed at all 
times by the principle that a hearing before the Student C ourt is primarily a 
matter of student responsibility . 
VI. Procedures and Penalties adopted by the Student Court. 

The Student Court shall formulate its own bylaws governing internal organization 
And procedure. Such In laws must be consistent with the 1 lonor Code. 

A. Hearings shall be called by the Court President to be held on a date not less than 
three nor more than ten class da) S after notice to the accused as provided in Section 
IV-2. Exceptions to these time requirements may be granted. 

B. Upon reaching a finding oi guilty, the Court shall make a recommendation to the 
Vice-President of the College as to the administrative action it deems appropriate 
within the following limitations: 

1. A minimum penalty shall be loss of assignment or test credit for the assignment 
or test for violations involving cheating as specified in Section II, subsections 1, 
2, and 3. 

Additional penalties such as reprimands, suspension, or others may be recom- 
mended for any aspects of Section II. 

2. Maximum penalty for a first offense of am type shall be suspension for a full 
calendar year. 

3. Maximum penalty for a second offense may be suspension for three years. 



64 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



C. Immediately following a hearing, the accused will be informed of the Court's 
finding, and its recommendation to the Vice President/ Dean of Faculty. If the 
finding is guilty, the accused will be informed that the Court may reopen the case 
with the consent of the accused for good cause, within a three week period. 

D. The Vice President/Dean of Faculty will inform all involved persons in writing 
of the action taken in view of Court recommendation. The Court Secretary will 
post public notice of the Vice President's action by case number without identify- 
ing the accused. 

VII. Appeals of Findings and Penalties: 

Should students have cause to question the findings of the Court or the action of the 
Vice President of the College or both, they have the right to appeal. The channels of 
appeal are as follows: 
A. Court findings and /or the administrative action of the Vice President of the 

College may be appealed within five days by writing the President of the College. 

Further appeal procedures will conform to the appeal procedures of the College 

and of the Policies of the Board of Regents, University System of Georgia. 
VIILSupervision of the Student Court: 

As an institutional means of responding to reported infractions of the Honor Code, 
the Student Court is ultimately responsible to the President of the College. 

Supervision of the Student Court will be accomplished ordinarily through the Vice 
President for Student Affairs and the Advisors. 

In accordance with Article VI, Section F, of the College Statutes, the Vice President 
for Student Affairs will provide general supervision of the Student Court and will 
provide other guidance or services as directed by the President of the College. 
IX. Revision of the Honor Code will require confirmation by the majority vote of those 
faculty and student body members voting. 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

General Degree Requirements 

1. Each student is responsible for fulfilling the requirements of the degree program 
chosen in accordance with the regulations of the college catalog. 

2. Exceptions to course requirements for a degree are permitted only with the written 
approval of the appropriate Dean, upon the recommendation of the department or 
division head. However, all exceptions to the core curriculum requirements must 
have the approval of the Vice President and Dean of Faculty. 

3. A student will normally graduate under the catalog in effect at the time of admission 
to the College. In the School of Health Professions, a student will graduate under the 
catalog in effect at the time of admission or readmission (whichever is more current) 
to a particular Health Professions program. In the School of Education, a student will 
graduate under the catalog in effect at the time of admission to the teacher education 
program. Armstrong State College, however, reserves the right to change any provi- 
sion listed in this catalog, including but not limited to academic requirements for 
graduation, without actual notice to individual students. If students have been absent 
from the College for two or more consecutive years, they should expect to meet all 
requirements in effect at the time of return. 

4. Not more than one-fourth of the work counted toward a degree may consist of courses 
taken by correspondence, extension, or examination. No correspondence courses may 
be used to meet the requirements in the major field or related fields for the Bachelor's 
degree or in English composition or foreign language. No correspondence courses 
may be taken while a student is enrolled, without prior approval of the appropriate 
Dean and the head of the department in which the student is majoring. 

5. By State law, each student who receives a diploma or certificate from a school 
supported by the State of Georgia must demonstrate proficiency in United States 



ACADFMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION 



Histor) and Government and in Georgia liist<>i\ and Govemmei len! -it 

\rmstrong State 1 ollege ma) demonstrate siu h profit iei* \ b) 

\ Examinations. For I 5. and Georgia Governmenl CLEP \mcncan Government 

and local test on Georgia constitution fori Sand 

clip Advanced Placement Te9l or College Board Admission ;ram 

\v hn\ emenl I est 
B Credit in certain courses. For I 5. andGeoi rnmenl Political Science 113; 

foi i s and Georgia Histor) History 251 oi 252 oi any uppei division coui 

l S Histor) 
6 1 1> qualirj tor the ba< ( alaureate degree, a student must earn .it \r tnstrong .it i. 
quarter hours of < redit applicable tow ard me degree tdditionall) . the student must 
complete successfull) at Ar m s tr on g at least half of the upper division* redits required 
m the major field ot stud) l or students in tea< herediu ation programs, tin- major field 
ol stud) is the tea< hing field I or tin- Associate I tegree, tin- student must ( omplete .it 
least 45 quarter hours ot course work at Armstrong State College- Armstrong students 
enrolled in the cooperatn e degree p r ograms with \n annah State C ollege in Busii 
1 ducation ma\ be exempted from these requirements b) a recommendation ot the 
I lean ot the School oi l ducation, concurrence by the I ducation ( urrk ulum c ommit- 
tee and appro\ aJ oi the C ommittee on Academic Standing. 
I or graduation the student must earn an o\ erall a^ erage oi 2.0 or better considering 
work taken at all colleges, computed in such manner that a course w ill be counted on!) 
once regardless of the number of times that it has been repeated, rhegradeeamed in 

the last attempt will determine the number of honor points assigned tor graduation. 
Additionally! the student must earn a GPA oi 2.0 or better in ea< h of the following: 

A. All work at Armstrong 

B. All courses in the major held. 

8. To qualify for a second Armstrong baccalaureate degree, a candidate must earn at 
Armstrong at least 45 additional hours ot credit and meet all qualitative requirements 

tor the degree 

9. Before a degree will be co nf erred students must pay all tees and must submit to the 
Registrar a completed Application for Graduation tuv (]iitirtcr< before graduation. A 
candidate tor a degree, unless excused in writing by the President, Vice President and 
Dean ot Faculty, Vice President ot Student Affairs, or I )ean of Academic and Enrollment 
Ser\ ices, must attend the graduation exercises at which a degree is to be conferred. 

10 All students must successfully complete the Regents lest and must take an Pxit 
Examination in their major field as may be stipulated as requirements tor graduation. 
Candidates tor a second baccalaureate degree are exempted from the Regents lest 
requirement. 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

Each unit in the University System of Georgia requires as a Core Curriculum tor all 
baccalaureate degree programs the following minimum number oi quarter hours in the 

major areas ot study. 

Hours 
Area I 

Humanities, including, but not limited to, grammar & composition & literature 20 

Area II 

Mathematics & the natural sciences, including, but not limited to, 

mathematics and a 10-hour sequence of laboratory courses in the 

biological or physical sciences 20 

Area III 

Social Sciences, including, but not limited to, history & American go\ernment 20 

Area IV 

Courses appropriate to the major field of the indiyidual student 30 

TOTAL~90 






66 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



In addition to the University System Core Curriculum requirements as outlined 
above, Armstrong State College requires six quarter hours in physical education as part 
of all baccalaureate degree programs. 

The student in any baccalaureate degree program at Armstrong State College must 
complete the following specific Core Curriculum requirements. Consult the relevant 
departmental section for a complete statement of degree requirements for a specific 
program. Certain courses in the Core Curriculum may be exempted with credit awarded. 

Hours 
Area I 

Humanities 20 

ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

One of the following courses: 

ART 200, 271, 272, 273, DRS 201, MUS 200, PHI 201 5 

Area II 

Mathematics & the Natural Sciences 20 

One of the following course sequences: 

MAT 101, 103 

MAT 101, 195 

MAT 101, 220 

MAT 101, 290 10 

One of the following course sequences: 

BIO 101 or 111, 102 or 112 

CHE 121, 122 

CHE 128, 129 

PHY 211, 212 

PHY 217, 218 

PHS121,122 10 

Area III 

Social Sciences 20 

HIS 114, 115 or 192 10 

POS113 5 

One course selected from: 

PSY 101, SOC 201, ANT 201, ECO 201 or 202, GEO 212 5 

Area IV 

Courses Appropriate to the Major Field 30 

Art 

ART 111, 112, 201, 202, 213 25 

MUS 200 5 

Goals for the Core Curriculum 

The core curriculum is the heart of undergraduate education at Armstrong. The 
following is a statement of the goals that all students should achieve once they have 
completed their core courses. It defines what the college expects of its students and what 
it tries to accomplish in its general education courses. 

What does it mean to be an educated human being? The fundamental goals of all education are 
two-fold: the inculcation of a body of knowledge and values, and development of the skills necessary 
to acquire and judge them. The areas of the core curriculum address these goals by asking and 
exploring the following questions. 



ACADEMIC POLICIE B AND I f J f OHMATION Wl 



\\y\\ I HOW Jo hum. in being! dcfillC their hum. 111 it \ 

in what works and b) what means have we most full) < • >ui humanity ' H<".-. 

do \\ c judge th< 

rhe< ourses in this are rive students an appreciation and understand 

human culture and expression developing theii aesthetic imaginative empatheti< and 
intellectual powers In addition these courses propose to instruct students In th«- 
methods and language ol si Kolai l\ and i ritii .il iIim oui 

[lie objectives of these courses are to help students 
Kcad and w rite effe* ti\ el) 

— Conduct librar) research with efficiency andintegrit) 

Support and defend an interpretation b) gathering information, reasonin] 
neralizing and rea< King i otm lusions 

— Develop a vocabulary to discuss the elements oi oneoi the arts 

— I xpres8 an understanding ol one o( me arts in i ritical essays 

— I demonstrate >m understanding ot the relationship betv* een art and i ulture 

ties II: What is the relationship between human beings and the universe7 

I low do we use its resources wisel) ? What is the appropriate language to use in 
discussing and modeling the natural phenomena that we observe? How do uc build 
conceptual models of our own? 

I he courses in mis area ha> e the common objective of increasing the students' ability 
to understand and participate in scientific ^nd technical discourse by providing the 
student with some oi the specific knowledge oi mathematk s and natural sciences that is 
presumed in that discourse. 

In addition to knowledge-based objectives, the courses have the additional objecth es 
of helping students to 

— Acquire skills m obsen ing natural phenomena, thereby increasing understand- 
ing of the uni\ erst' 

— Develop ^n understanding of the scientific method ^nd its impact on modern 
thought 

— IV\ clop skills m reading and understanding quantitative/ scientific, and technical 
information 

— Acquire skills in extracting theessenceofa problem from its verbal statement and 
applying the appropriate scientific ^nd mathematical tools to solve the problem 

Area III: What are the relationships between human beings and their Institutions? 
rhe courses of this area seek to go e students a comprehension of human behavior and 

institutions as these merge from social and historical relationships. In addition, they 
propose to instruct students in the basic language ,md methods of social, political, and 
historical discourse and to inculcate a sense of openness and tolerance that comes from 
the examination of diverse values ^nd perspectn es. 
The objectives of these courses are to help students 

— Demonstrate a comprehension of social relationships .md institutions and their 
development 

— Communicate with clarity about social relationships ^nd institutions and their 
development 

— Identify basic features of human social relationships ^nd problems 

— Develop competence in regard to making positive contributions toward solving 
social problems 

— Demonstrate an understanding of both the uniqueness oi individuals and the 
complexity of collective human experience as perceived through history c\nd the 
social sciences 



68 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Regents' Testing Program 

Each institution of the University System of Georgia shall assure the other institutions, 
and the System as a whole, that students obtaining a degree from that institution possess 
certain minimum skills of reading and writing. The Regents' Testing Program has been 
d e\ eloped to help in the attainment of this goal. The objectives of the Testing Program are: 
(1) to provide Systemwide information on the status of student competence in the areas 
of reading and writing; and (2) to provide a uniform means of identifying those students 
who fail to attain the minimum levels of competence in the areas of reading and writing. 

Students enrolled in undergraduate degree programs leading to the baccalaureate 
degree shall pass the Regents' Test as a requirement for graduation. Students must take the 
Test in the quarter after they have completed 60 quarter credit hours if they have not taken 
it previously. Each institution shall provide an appropriate program of remediation and 
shall require students who have earned 75 quarter credit hours and have not passed the 
Test to enroll in the appropriate remedial course or courses until they pass the Test. 
Students with 60 or more college-level credit hours transferring from System programs 
that do not require the Regents' Test or from institutions outside the System shall take the 
Test no later than the second quarter of enrollment in a program leading to the baccalau- 
reate degree and in subsequent quarters shall be subject to all provisions of this policy. 

The Regents' Test is not a requirement for an Associate of Applied Science Degree or 
an Associate of Science degree in an allied health field, although institutions may choose 
to require the Test for these degrees. (Armstrong State College has chosen to require the 
Test of all undergraduates who have not earned a baccalaureate or higher degree 
regardless of degree objective.) 

A student holding a baccalaureate or higher degree from a regionally accredited 
institution of higher education will not be required to complete the Regents' Test in order 
to receive a degree from a University System institution. 

The Chancellor will issue administrative procedures for the operation of the Regents' 
Testing Program. (A copy of Regents' Testing Program Administrative Procedures is 
available from the Office of Student Affairs, Room 11, Administration Building.) 

According to "Regents' Testing Program Administration Procedures" institutions 
may increase requirements related to the Regents' Testing Program "provided that such 
increased requirements are authorized by the Chancellor and ... published in the official 
catalog of the institution prior to implementation." 

Regents' Test: Administration and Remediation Requirements 

Students attending Armstrong State College are urged to take the Regents' Test during 
their first quarter of enrollment after the quarter in which the 45th credit hour is earned. 
For the purpose of enforcing Regents' Testing Program Policy, enrolled students are 
identified by computer printed notices on end-of-quarter grade reports and transfers 
through the processes of admission and transcript evaluation. Students register for the 
Test at the Office of Student Affairs within the publicized test registration period. 

Students who neglect to take the Regents' Test until their first quarter of enrollment 
after the quarter in which the 60th credit hour is earned may be barred from all phases 
of registration until after Test scores are posted. 

Regardless of credit hours earned, students who do not pass the Regents' Test may be 
required by Armstrong State College to take remedial courses before they retake the 
Regents' Test. In accordance with Regents' Testing Program Policy, students who have 
not passed the Test and who have earned 75 quarter hours must take remedial courses, 
whether or not they have attempted the test. 

Students who fail the reading portion of the Regents' Test and who have less than 
75 hours earned with an adjusted GPA of 2.5 or better may appeal the requirement for 
Developmental Studies Reading 025 (Developing Reading Maturity) to the Dean of 
Academic and Enrollment Services. 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION 



Students who fail the essa) portionoftht* rest and have l< 
an adjusted CPAol 1.0 or better and a l.Oor better in required core course's in I i<. 
appeal the requirement foi English the M< >ad ol the 

Department of Languages Literature and DramauV trta 

Regents Test: Special Categories of Students 

Students vt hose native language is not English must take the reading component of the 
Regents Km but ma) take a college examination to certify competence in writing Ih»- 
college equivalent ol tin- essa) component ol tin- Regents I est is administered <>n the 
same date as the reading ( omponent ol the l est International students are allowed 
hours for each test 

Students who are handicapped ma) request additional time for the Regents' 

Regents Test: Essay Review 

Students ma) request a formal review ol failure on the essa) component oi the 
Regents I est it the essa) re< eived at least one passing s< ore and the ret iew is initiated 
b) mid-term ol the first quarter ol enrollment following testing and no more than one 
year from the quarter in which the failure occurred Only re\ iews pr ocessed In tin- tirst 

two weeks Of I quarter will be answered before the next Regents' I est. Students ma) 

initiate an essa) ret iew at the t Hhce ol Student Affairs. 

Regents' Test: Health Professions Program Requirement 

Before a student in a 1 lealth Professions program may enter his her last quarter, he 
she must have passed the Regents' examination. 

Physical Education Requirements 

All students who are enrolled in baccalaureate degree programs tor ten or more 
quarter hours on the daytime schedule must adhere to Armstrong Core Curriculum Area 

Y requirements. Am student who holds a valid lite guarding certificate or a valid water 
safety instructor certificate or passes the Armstrong swimming test may be exempted 
trom PE 103 or PE 108. Physical education is not required of anyone who is beyond the 

age ot 2^ at the time of initial matriculation at Armstrong or of anyone enrolled primarily 
in evening clasSi - 

Students should check their program of Study tor P.E. 117 and/or 166 requirements 

English and Mathematics Placement 

During the initial quarters ot enrollment at Armstrong State College, students must 
enroll in the appropriate sequence ot English composition courses until the sequence 
has been completed and /or the Regents' lest has been passed. Students must not delay 
this sequence beyond their second quarter of attendance. For assistance in identif) ing 
the appropriate English composition courses, students Should consult advisors in the 
departments of their declared majors or the Office oi Admissions, or the Department of 
Languages, Literature, and Dramatic .Arts. See I anguages. Literature, and Dramatic Arts 
Department tor further information. 

The College reserves the right to place students in appropriate English <.mo\ mathemat- 
ics courses in the core curriculum. Diagnostic tests are administered tor this purpN 

State Requirement In History and Government 

By State law, each student who receives a diploma or certificate from a school 
supported by the State of Georgia must demonstrate proficiency in United States 
History and Government and in Georgia Historv and Government A student at 
Armstrong State College may demonstrate such proficiency bv: 



70 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



A. Examinations. For U.S. and Georgia Government — CLEP: American Government 
and local test on the Georgia constitution; for U.S. and Georgia History — the relevant 
CLEP, Advanced Placement Test, or College Board Admissions Testing Program 
Achievement Test. 

B. Credit in certain courses. For U.S. and Georgia government - Political Science 113; 
for U.S. and Georgia History - History 251 or 252 or any upper division course in U.S. 
History. 

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of 
Science Degrees 

Requirements for each major program leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts with 
a major in Art, English, History, Music, Political Science, Psychology, or to the degree 
of Bachelor of Science with a major in Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, or 
Mathematical Sciences are described in the appropriate departmental listing. For the BA 
and the BS degrees, a minimum of 185 quarter hours, exclusive of the required physical 
education courses, is required for graduation. An exit exam is also required. 

Each student in one of these major programs must complete the 90-hour core 
curriculum requirement as listed above, along with the 6-hour Physical Education 
requirement. 

Students will not be allowed to take senior division courses in the major field unless 
they have a minimum grade of "C" in all prerequisite courses in that field. No major 
program in a department will require more than 60 quarter hours at all levels in the major 
field; however, the department may recommend up to 70 quarter hours. 

For its major program, a department will require from 15 to 30 quarter hours of 
specific courses or approved elective courses in related fields and may require language 
courses reaching the degree of proficiency specified by the department. Total require- 
ments in the major and related fields, may not exceed 85 quarter hours. 

Each BA or BS degree program, except those designed for Dental Hygiene, Medical 
Technology, Nursing and teacher certification, will include a minimum of 15 hours of 
electives approved for credit within the Armstrong State College curriculum. 

Associate Degree Requirements 

Each associate degree program includes as part of its curriculum the following: 

ENG101, 102 10 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

MAT 101 5 

POS113 5 

One five hour course selected from 
Areas I, II, or III of the Baccalaureate 

Core 5 

Three PE credit hours 3 

TOTAL 33 

Students in associate degree programs are required to complete successfully the 
Regents' Examination and may be required to take an Exit Examination in the appropri- 
ate area of concentration. 

Numbering System for Courses 

In the course listing to follow, there appear three numbers in parentheses after each 
course title. The first number listed indicates the number of hours of lecture; the second 
number listed indicates the number of hours of laboratory; the third number listed 
indicates the number of quarter hours of credit carried by the course. The letter "V" 
represents variable hours. 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION 



71 



^ ourses numbered 0-99 carr) institutional credit 01U) and mat not be applied 
im c ourses numbered i*h» i lerally planned foi the freshman 

courses numbered > for the sophomore yeai courses number* I r tin- 

junioi yeai and courses numbered i' 1 " >99 foi the senioi yeai 

(, ourses taken to fulfill core i unit alum requirements ma) not be used to n i 
requirements o( a degree program 

Lettering System for Course 

In the course listings gh en in the Armstrong ( ore( urri< ulum requirements and in the 
departmental curricula which follow, mere appear two or three letters preceding a three 
digit number Following is an exhaustive list of .ill abbreviations used for course 
designation purposes 



u ( 


= 


v v ounting (SS< 


Ills 


= 


1 [istorj 




\\l 


= 


Anthropology 


HS 


= 


\ lealth Si uin e 




\KI 


= 


\rt 


[RN 


= 


[oumalism 




W 


= 


w Strategies foi Success 


LAT 


= 


1 atm 




\s] 


= 


Astronom) 


LIN 


= 


I inguistu s 




HAP 


= 


Business Administration (SS< 


LM 


= 


1 ibrar) Media 




WO 


= 


Biolog) 


LS 


= 


I ibrar) S< ience 




BOl 


= 


Botam 


MAT 


= 


Mathematics 




BSN 


= 


Baccalaureate Nursing 


MET 


= 


Meteorology 




a p 


= 


Cooperative Education Program 


MIL 


= 


Military Science 




( HE 


= 


Chemistry 


MT 


= 


Medical rechnology 




cj 


s 


Criminal [ustice 


MUS 


= 


Musk 




cs 


= 


Computer Science 


NSC 


= 


\a\ al Science 




DH 


= 


Dental \ [ygiene 


NUR 


= 


Nursing (Associate) 




DRS 


= 


Drama and Speech 


OCE 


= 


Oceanography 


1 

a 


DSE 


= 


Development Studies English 


PA 


= 


Public Administration 




DSM 


= 


De\ Studies Math 


PBH 


= 


Public Histor) 




DSR 


= 


I V\ . studies Reading 


PE 


= 


Physical Education 




ECO 


= 


Economics 


PI \1 


= 


Physical Education Major 




EDN 


= 


Education 


PHI 


= 


Philosophy 




EGR 


= 


Engineering 


PHS 


= 


Physical Science 




ENG 


= 


English 


PHY 


= 


Physics 




ENT 


= 


Entomology 


POS 


= 


Political Science 




EXC 


= 


Exceptional Children 


PSY 


= 


Psychology 




FLM 


= 


Film 


RAD 


= 


Radiologic Technologies 




FRE 


= 


French 


RT 


= 


Respiratory I herapy 




GEL 


= 


Geology 


SOC 


= 


Sociology 




GEO 


= 


Geography 


SPA 


= 


Spanish 




GER 


= 


German 


SSC 


= 


Savannah State Exchange 




HE 


= 


Health Education 


ZOO 


= 


Zoo I* 





72 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

DEGREE PROGRAMS 

The degree programs of Armstrong State College are presented in this catalog by 
school, by division, and by department. The College is organized into three schools, each 
administered by a dean, and two non-school affiliated departments. The degrees offered 
by each school and division are listed below: 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Degree Department 

Associate of Arts Interdepartmental 

Associate of Applied Science 
Criminal Justice Government 

Bachelor of Arts 

Art Art and Music 

Drama/Speech Languages, Literature, and Dramatic Arts 

English Languages, Literature, and Dramatic Arts 

History History 

Music Art and Music 

Political Science Government 

Psychology Social and Behavioral Sciences 

Bachelor of General Studies Interdepartmental 

Bachelor of Music Education Art and Music 

Bachelor of Science 

Biology Biology 

Chemistry Chemistry and Physics 

Computer Science Mathematics and Computer Science 

Criminal Justice Government 

Mathematical Sciences Mathematics and Computer Science 

Physical Sciences Chemistry and Physics 

+Master of Arts 
History History 

+Master of Science 
Criminal Justice Government 

School of Education 
Division of Curriculum and Instruction 

Degree 

Bachelor of Science in Education 
Early Elementary Education 
Middle School Education 
Secondary School Education 
^Business Education 

Social Science Education (History) 

Social Science Education (Political Science) 
All Levels (K-12) Degree Programs 

Art Education 

Speech Correction 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND INFORMATION 73 



c Mhi-i I degree Programs 
1 he Division of ( uniculum and Instruction works cooper a tively with the Di vision 
of Physical Education and athletics in providing the Bachelor of Science in Edu 
In Physical Education as an all levels (K ;ram Vlso, working with d< 

ments in tin- School ol Kits and Sciences, the Division helps provi 

ees with teachei certification in the secondar) fields <>t Biology, c hen 
I nglish, l Ustor) Mathematical Sciences and Political & ience (see the departmental 
set lions in tin- \rh and ^ ien< es 1 1 -> 1 1 m v; -- tor degree partk ulars) 
i Master ol I ducation 

1 arlj Elementary Education 

Middle S< hool I ducation 

Se< ondaxj I ducation 
'Business I ducation 
l nglish 
Mathematics 

ience I ducation 
Soda! Studies 

Special Education 
Behavioi Disorders 
I earning Disabilities 
Speech I anguage Pamoloj 

•Offered in conjunction with Savannah State College. 

Division of Health and Physical Education 

Bachelor of Science in Education 
Physical Education 

School of Health Professions 

Degree Department 

Associate of Science 

Dental Hygiene Dental Hygiene 

Nursing Associate Degree Nursing 

Radiologic Technologies Radiologic Technologies 

Respiratory Therapy Respiratory Therapy 

Bachelor of Health Science Health Science 

Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene Education Dental Hygiene 

Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology Medical Technology 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing Baccalaureate Nursing 

♦Master of Health Science Health Science 

♦Master of Science in Nursing Baccalaureate Nursing 

♦Graduate programs are offered by Georgia Southern University in affiliation with 
Armstrong State College 



74 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 





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W-3**J 





76 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

The College of Graduate Studies 

Responding to increasing needs for graduate-level services in South Georgia, the 
Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia approved the establishment of 
Georgia Southern University, effective July 1, 1990. In addition to the conversion of 
Georgia Southern College to "university" status, the change brings together the gradu- 
ate-level instructional and research activities in South Georgia by "affiliating" the 
graduate functions of both Armstrong State College and Savannah State College with 
Georgia Southern University. Armstrong State College and Savannah State College 
maintain autonomy as undergraduate colleges but participate in graduate activities 
under the auspices of the College of Graduate Studies at Georgia Southern University. 
While all undergraduate degrees continue to be awarded by the three participating 
institutions, all graduates degrees are now awarded by Georgia Southern University. 

Purpose and Organization 

Graduate programs are designed to provide students with the opportunity and 
resources to enhance their educational, professional, and cultural backgrounds while 
improving their professional skills and competence. Graduate programs encourage 
scholarly inquiry through the appropriate application of valid research methods. 

All graduate programs are administered and coordinated by the Vice-President and 
Dean for Graduate Studies and Research who serves as Chairman of the Graduate 
Council. The Graduate Council is an inter-institutional advisory body composed of 
representatives from Georgia Southern University, Armstrong State College, and Savan- 
nah State College. The Council provides policy direction to the Vice President on all 
matters related to graduate programs. 

Graduate Degree Programs 

Georgia Southern University continues to offer the following graduate degree 
programs: 

Master of Arts 

Master of Business Administration 

Master of Education 

Master of Fine Arts 

Master of Public Administration 

Master of Recreation Administration 

Master of Science 

Master of Science for Teachers 

Master of Science in Nursing 

Master of Technology 

Education Specialist Degree 

Doctorate of Education in Educational Administration 

Georgia Southern University offers the following graduate degree programs in 
Savannah in affiliation with either Armstrong State College or Savannah State College 
(additional graduate courses are taught in Savannah in support of other programs of study): 

Armstrong State College 

Master of Arts - History 

Master of Education 

Master of Health Science 

Master of Science - Criminal Justice 

Master of Science in Nursing 

Savannah State College 

Master of Public Administration 

Master of Social Work (currently under development) 



GRADUATE STUDIES 



77 



Programs of Study 

Adult fend \ a ational I dm abort 

Biolo 

Business 

Business I due ation 

i. ounselor l du< ation 

c riminal Justice 

I arl) c hildhood I ducation 

I ducational Administration 

1 nglish 

f xen ise Science 

1 rench 

c lennan 

Health and Physical Education 

Health Science 

History 

Public History* 
I [ome I conomics 
Instructional Media 
1 ibrary Media 
Mathematics 

Middle Grades I ducation 
Music 
Nursing 
Political Science 
Psychology 

Public Administration 
Reading Specialist 
Recreation Administration 
School Administration ^nd Supervision 
School Psychology 
School Psychometry 
ace 

mdary Subject Matter Supervision 
Social Science 

Social Work (currently underdevelopment) 
Sociology 
Spanish 
Special Education for Exceptional Children 

Behavior Disord I 

Interrelated 

Learning Disabilities* 

Mental Retardation 

Speech language Pathology* 
Sport Management 
Technology 
Technology Education 

"Indicates programs offered in affiliation 
+ Indieates nroprams nffpred ir 



Degree 

M Id 

M I A Mid Ms I 

Ms 

M B \ 

Mid' Msl 

Mid Ids 

Ms- 

Mid' Ids 

Id D 

M \ M Id ' Ms I Ms 

Ms 

M Id 

Ml d 

Mid Msl Ed.S 

Mils • 

M \ • 

Mid. Msl 

Mid. 

Ids 

M.S./M.ld- M.s I | 

Mid.' I d.s. 

M.Ed. M.s.I. I J S 

M.S.V 

M.A. 

M.A. 

M.P.A.+ 

Mid. I d 

MR. A 

M.I d I d s 

Ed.S. 

M.ld. 

M.Ed.VM.S.T./Ed > 

M.Ed. 

M I d.VM.S.T./Ed.S. 

M.S.W.+ 

M.A 

M.ld. 

M.Ed.VEd.S. 



M.S. 

M.I. 
M.Id./M.S.T./Ed.S. 



Indicates programs offered in affiliation with Armstrong State College 
Indicates programs offered in affiliation with Savannah State College 



78 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Admission to Graduate Study 

Graduates of colleges or universities accredited by the proper regional accrediting 
association may apply for admission to the College of Graduate Studies. Admission is 
restricted to include only those students whose academic records indicate that they can 
successfully undertake graduate work. Only students formally admitted to the Graduate 
School are eligible to enroll in graduate courses (courses numbered 600, 700, 800, and 
900). 

All applications must be mailed to: 

The College of Graduate Studies 
Georgia Southern University 
Statesboro, Georgia 30480-8113 

Application Procedures 

All degree-seeking applicants for admission to the College of Graduate Studies must: 

1. Submit a completed application furnished by the College of Graduate Studies. 

2. Submit two (2) official transcripts of all previous academic work. 

3. Submit official test scores as required for the program selected. (To be official, test 
scores must be sent to the College of Graduate Studies directly from the testing agency 
or be recorded on an official transcript.) 

All applicants who do not wish to work toward a degree must: 

1. Submit a completed application and other required forms. 

2. Submit two (2) official transcripts of all previous academic work. 

3. Test scores are not required for Non-Degree applicants. 

Transcripts must be officially embossed copies sent directly from the Institution to the 
College of Graduate Studies at Georgia Southern University. 

The completed application and all credentials should be received by the College of 
Graduate Studies by the deadline dates listed in the Georgia Southern University 
Graduate Catalog. Materials submitted in support of an application become the property 
of Georgia Southern University and cannot be forwarded or returned. 

Each completed application with supporting materials is referred to the school or 
division in which the applicant proposes to study- The graduate faculty in that depart- 
ment or division consider the application. The final decision on each application is made 
by the Vice-President for Graduate Studies and Research. 

Assistantships 

A number of qualified graduate students may be given financial aid in the form of 
assistantships or teaching fellowships while pursuing work leading to a graduate degree. 
The criteria and procedure for appointment as a graduate assistant may be obtained in 
the Office of the Vice President for Graduate Studies and Research at Georgia Southern 
University or the Office of the Associate Graduate Dean at Armstrong State College. 

Georgia Southern University Graduate Catalog 

Please refer to the Georgia Southern University Graduate Catalog for additional 
information related to admission procedures and requirements. The Graduate Catalog 
also contains information on graduate programs, graduate courses, the graduate faculty, 
financial aid opportunities, and academic standards and regulations. 



GRADUATE STUDIES 79 



Copies of the Graduate Catalog and application information are available in 
the following offices: 

1 he t ollege ol ^ Iraduate Studies 

I .nullum BOX SI I I 

i Southern t rm ersit) 
Statesboro ( Georgia J0460 s i I ) 
(912)681 >384 
>GR \n GSl 

Office of the Associate Graduate 1 tear 
Armstrong State ( 0U1 
Sa> annah ( leorgia 11419 
(91 

Office o( the Assoc iate c iraduate l tean 

m\ annah State College 
Sa> annah c leorgia 31404 
(91 B01 

Off-Campus Graduate Centers 

Resident graduate credit is offered on off-campus centers at Brunswick and Fort 
Gordon (Augusta). Students m Brunswick may pursue Master of t ducation (M I d.) 

programs in: Early Childhood Education, School Administration and Supervision. 
Special Education for 1 xceptional Children, and Middle Grades 1 ducation or Public 
Administration (M.P.A.), while Fort Cordon students may pursue programs in either 
Adult Education (M.Ed.) or Public Administration (M.P.A.). 

Off-campUS admission ^nd degree requirements are identical to those of the on- 
campus programs. Information can he obtained at the off-campus sites as w ell as on the 
on-campus sites listed above. 

GSU Graduate Office 
Continuing 1 ducation Office 
Brunswick College 
Brunswick, Georgia 31523 
(912)264-7260 

Education Dh ision 

GSU Graduate Office #38804 

Ft. Gordon, Georgia 30905 

(404)790-9338 

Immunization Requirements 

In order to comply with University System of Georgia policies, all new students 
attending Georgia Southern University will be required to submit a Certificate of 
Immunization for measles, mumps, and rubella prior to registering for classes. Students 
who were previously enrolled at Georgia Southern Unh ersity, Armstrong State College, 
Savannah State College, or Brunswick College will be exempt from this regulation. 

Students who do not present evidence of immunization as set forth abo\ e will not be 
allowed to register or to attend classes until such time as they can present the required 
immunization certificate. Students who have religious objections c\nd students whose 



80 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



physicians have certified that they cannot 
be immunized because of medical reasons 
may be allowed to register with the under- 
standing that they must leave the campus 
in the event of an outbreak of the aforemen- 
tioned diseases. 

The certification must be on a form pro- 
vided by Georgia Southern and signed by 
a physician or an official of a County Health 
Department. This certification form is 
mailed to all new students admitted to 
Georgia Southern. If you have questions 
call the Health Services Center at (912) 681- 
5641. 





4* T 



t 



k 



•v/.-- 



82 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Adams, Joseph V., Dean 
Warlick, Roger K., Assistant Dean 

Philosophy and Goals 

Through its faculty, laboratory facilities, and other instructional resources, the School 
of Arts and Sciences offers students a broad range of educational opportunity in curricula 
ranging from Anthropology to Zoology. 

As a foundation for baccalaureate programs, the School provides the core curriculum 
of the College - courses in the arts, humanities, and mathematics, as well as the sciences 
and social sciences, which are required of all students regardless of major. (For details, 
please see the section on "Degree Requirements" in this Catalog.) Beyond these basics, 
School curricula enable students to pursue specialized studies in a discipline, which 
provides a solid grounding in the field by probing its theory, methodology, and broader 
implications. Finally, major programs generally culminate in a "senior experience" -e.g., 
an internship, a capstone course, or a senior thesis - which is designed to help students 
comprehend their field as a whole. 

In summary, Arts and Sciences curricula are designed to sharpen critical thinking and 
problem-solving skills and to cultivate such ethical sensitivity as will (1) equip students 
for careers, (2) provide a firm foundation for graduate study, and (3) educate for living. 
To this end many departments have active student professional or honorary societies. 
Moreover, the School of Arts and Sciences seeks to complement classroom instruction by 
mounting a major schedule of cultural events each year, such as lectures, field trips, 
faculty and student recitals or concerts, plays and exhibits - most of which are opened to 
the general public. More than one hundred such events are presented each year. In 
addition to supporting the overall mission of the College to serve the community beyond 
the campus, such events persuasively demonstrate for students how greatly all are 
enriched when curriculum comes to life. 

Organization and Degrees 

The School of Arts and Sciences includes the departments of Art and Music; Biology; 
Chemistry and Physics; Government; History; Languages, Literature, and Dramatic 
Arts; Mathematics and Computer Science; Social and Behavioral Sciences; Developmen- 
tal Studies; and Military Science. 
Undergraduate degree programs: 
Associate in Arts 

Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice 
Bachelor of Arts with majors in: 
Art 

Drama /Speech 
English 
History 
Music 

Political Science 
Psychology 
Bachelor of General Studies 
Bachelor of Music Education 
Bachelor of Science with majors in: 
Biology 
Chemistry 
Computer Science 
Criminal Justice 
Mathematical Sciences 
Physical Sciences 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Furthei particulars on the undergraduate liberal arts pro in 1 1 »« - 

m\ Hon devoted to each department Developmental Studies and Militai 
detailed in tin- 1 haptei on Bpei ial pro 

vera! liberal arts degrees are offered in cooperation with the School <>t i ducation 
and pro> ide tea< her certification I hese are shown below; however, please note the ri 
». omprehensh e list ol certification programs in the School ol I ducation section ol 
i atal< ■ 

Bachelor ol Vrts(with tea< her certification) with majors in 
l nglish 
I listor) 

Political S< ience 
Ba< helor ol S< ience (witii tea< hex certification) with majors m. 
Biology 
Chemistr) 

Mathematical S< iences 
All teacher education programs are approved In the Georgia State Professional 
Standards Commission and are ace redited h\ the National c ouiu il tor A< ^ reditation ol 
I eacher 1 ducation. 

Minor Concentrations of Study 

[he following minors arc offered by departments within the School of Arts and 
Sciences. Students ma) include one or more of these in their programs of stud) as 
circumstances ma\ permit. 



Anthropolog) 

Art 

Bioli 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Communications 

Computer Science 

Criminal Justice 

Drama /Speech 

Economics 

I ngineering Science 

English 

Film 

Foreign I anguage 

I listor\ 

I [istorical Archaeology 

Human Biology 

International Studies 



I egal Studies 

Linguistics 

Mathematics 

Mental Health 

Military Science 

Music 

i )rganizationa] Psychology 

Philosophy 

Physical Sciences 

Physics 

Political Science 

Preservation Studies 

Psychology 

Public Administration 

Russian Studies 

Sociology 

Zoolog) 



General Studies 



Director: Dr. Grace Martin 

Social and Behavioral Sciences 

Coordinator: Dr. Donald Anderson 

Associate and baccalaureate degree programs in General Studies, emphasizing a 

liberal arts education, are operated under the general supervision of the Dean of the 
School oi Arts and Sciences and under the immediate direction of the head of the Division 
of Social and Behavioral Sciences. Curriculum guidance tor these programs is provided 
by the General Studies Degree Program Committee. Interested students should contact 
the General Studies Coordinator. 



84 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



The Bachelor of General Studies degree is also available at the Brunswick Center 
on the Brunswick College campus in Brunswick, Ga. Interested persons should contact 
the coordinator of the Brunswick Center or the General Studies Coordinator on the 
Armstrong campus. 

For the two-year degree of Associate in Arts, a student must complete at least 30 hours 
of the required course work and 45 quarter hours of all coursework in this program at 
Armstrong State College. The program is designed to provide a substantial liberal 
education as a base for upper division specialization. 

Certain courses may be exempted by examination. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF ASSOCIATE IN ARTS 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 63 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; 

PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. Approved laboratory science sequence 10 

2. MAT 101 and 103 or 195 or 220 or 290 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; HIS 251 or 252 10 

2. POS 113 and one course selected from: ANT 201; 

ECO 201, 202; PSY 101; SOC 201 10 

AreaV 3 

1. PE 103 or 108 1 

2. Two activity courses 2 

B. Courses in the Concentration and/or Electives 30 

These courses may be specified by a department or may be electives. 
Students planning work toward a baccalaureate degree should select 

courses that meet listed requirements of that degree program. 

C. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 93 
PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF GENERAL STUDIES 

At least four quarters prior to anticipated graduation, students must submit a degree 
proposal to the General Studies Coordinator for approval. 

Hours 
A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; 

PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103 or 195 or 220 or 290 10 

2. Approved laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201; ECO 201, 202; PSY 101; SOC 201 ."5 

Area IV 30 

1. HIS 251 or 252 5 

2. Two courses selected from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; 

PHI 201; two courses in any foreign language through the 200 level ... 10 



ART AND MUSIC 



I One or two courses selected from VNT201 CS115 12 

ECO ?S\ 101 l k 

i Oneoi two courses selected from BIO L01 i". 1 B( i m 

121 122 < III 128 129 CHE2 ill 211; I'M. 211 

PH\ 21 ' 218 219 PHS 121 
Vrea \ 
I PI I03oi 108and 117 oi 166 

i hree m th it) courses 

NOT1 Certain preceding < oursesma) be exempted by examination with credit awarded 
Uso ifaphysicalsc iencesequen< e is used to satisfy Vreall, then a biological science musl 
be v hosen in Area i\ I he i on\ erse is also true 

Other Requirements 

l A minimum ol )5 hours at the 300 level. 

2, \ maximum oi 40 hours m am one dis< ipline ex< luding courses taken 

under se< bon \ 
I No more than two D*s are allowed in the General Studies section. 
4. I ifteen of die M) ( leneral Studies hours must be i ompleted at 
Armstrong. 

General Studies 30 

( ourses al the 200 or aboi e level 

1. I [umanities 5-10 

American ch ilization, art, comparative literature, 

I nglish or American literature, history, music, philosophy. 

2. Social Sciences 5-10 

Anthropology, criminal justice, economics, geography, 

political science, psychology, public history, so< iology. 

Mathematics ,\nd Natural Sciences 5-10 

Astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, entomoloj 
geology, mathematics, meteorology, oceanography, 
ph) sics, zoology. 

4. Communication Arts 5-10 

c omputer science, drama/speech, 

film, foreign Languages, journalism, linguistics. 

Area of Concentration (Any University System approved minor) 20-29 

Electives , ' 36-45 

5. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTA1 191 

Art and Music 

Faculty 

* Anderson, James, Department Ylv^d 

Green, Rachel Keith, William 

Harris, Robert Schmidt, John 

Jensen, John * Schultz, Luanda 
v fensen, Linda Vogelsang, Kevin 

* Graduate Faculty 

The Department of Art and Music otters the Bachelor ot Arts degree with majors in art 
and music, the Bachelor of Music Education degree, and in cooperation with the 
Department of Secondary Education, the Bachelor of Science in Art Education. 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Placement Examinations 

Transfer and new students in music must take placement examinations as appropriate 
in applied music, music theory, and music history. Acceptance of transfer credit towards 
graduation requirements in each area is contingent upon the results of the examination. 

Transfer students in art will be required to take a placement examination in art history. 
Additionally, coursework at other institutions in studio art may not be counted towards 
graduation until a portfolio of artwork is submitted demonstrating competency in those 
areas in which classes have been completed. 

Additional Requirements for Music Majors 

There are a variety of departmental policies and regulations which affect music 
majors. Included are requirements for recital attendance, ensemble participation, piano 
proficiency, recital participation, applied music levels, and the Rising Junior Applied 
Music Examination. A copy of A Handbook of Policies and Regulations for Music Majors will 
be given to each music student. 

Please see the "Fees" section of this catalog for information on applied music fees. 

Directed Individual Studies (DIS) 

Directed Individual Studies (DIS) have a distinctly useful place in the Arts and 
Music curriculum. The intent of the DIS is for an enrichment experience that 
otherwise is unavailable in the classroom. Normally, regular curriculum coursework 
should not be completed by individual study. 

However, if a regular course is to be taught by individual study, the following 
criteria must be met before approval may be granted by the department head: 1) the 
course must not have been offered during the preceding three quarters nor be 
scheduled during the succeeding three quarters; 2) the student must gain the approval 
of the anticipated instructor; 3) transient students must gain the permission of not only 
the department head, but the dean of faculty, and of the college from which the student 
comes; and 4) the student must demonstrate, in writing, that a hardship will exist if 
permission is denied, for the student to take an individual study. 

PROGRAM FORTHEDEGREEOFBACHELOROF ARTS 
WITH A MAJOR IN ART 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; PHI 201; MUS 200 5* 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103 or 220 or 290 10 

2. Lab Science Sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201, ECO 201, PSY 101, SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. ART 111, 112, 201, 202, 213 25 

2. MUS 200 5 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 



ART AND MUSIC 87 



B ( .hum's m the Ma jo i I ield 

l \KI 204 -I I ■ • 

One from \k 
t Spe< ial ( ourse Requirements 

l l oreign language sequence through 10 I 
■ 
D I lecnves 

Recommend \ki 
I Regents and I \it I xarninationa 

rOTAI 196 

*(Ma) not be duplicated \\ 1 1 ii major field, ^rea I and elective requirements ) 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 
WITH A MAJOR IN MUSIC 

I lours 

\ v leneraJ Requirements H'l 

Wa I 20 

1. ENG 101. id: or 192,201 or292 15 

: One course from: \K1 200,271,272,273; \ll S200; PHI 201 

Viva 11 20 

1 MAI 101, 290 10 

2. 1 ab Science Sequence 10 

trea ill 20 

1. HIS 114, 11- or 192; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: AN! 201. ECO201, PS\ 101 

Vrea IV 30 

l. MLS 111. II 2, 113,211,212,213 18 

2 MUS 140 6 

Ml S 256 or 254 

Area V b 

1. PE L03or ion. L17 

2 1 hree activity courses 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

ourses in the Major Field 

1. MUS 240, 281, 340, 571, J72 173 24 

2 rwoCourses from MUS312, 361,412 

J One Course from MLS 416. 42-. 427 

C. Track Options 

1. General Track: Electives 

One of the following performance composition tracks. 
Prerequisite: Departmental Permission Only. 

2. Keyboard Performance 

ML S 258, 440, 420, 421 14 

Electives 24 

3. Vocal Performance 

MUS 313, 314, 313, 429, 440 1- 

Electives 26 

4. Wind Instrument Performance 

MUS 440. 481 M 

One course from MUS 312, 361, 412 3* 

One course from MLS 432 or 433 3 

Electives 



88 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



5. Composition 

MUS422 12 

One course from MUS 312, 361, 412 3* 

Electives 23 

D. Special Course Requirements 25 

1. ART 271, 272, 273 (may not be duplicated with Area I requirement) ...10 

2. Foreign language sequence through 103 15 

3. RECITAL PERFORMANCES (determined by option 3 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 197 
*(May not be duplicated with Major Field Requirements) 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF MUSIC EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102, or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 290 10 

2. Laboratory Science Sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201, ECO 201, SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN 200; PSY 101 10 

2. EDN 201 or PSY 201 5 

3. MUS 111, 112, 113, 140 15 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Courses in the Major Field 70-73 

1. MUS 211, 212, 213, 236, 237, 238, 239, 281 20 

2. MUS 240, 340 12 

3. MUS 312, 330, 331, 361, 412 17 

4. MUS 371, 372, 373 9 

5. One of the following emphases: 

A. Choral Emphasis 

MUS 353, 313, 423, 480, and 314 or 315 12 

B. Instrumental Emphasis 

MUS 227, 352, 416, 424, 481 12 

C. Keyboard Emphasis 

MUS 227, 425, 420 or 421, 423 or 424, 352 or 353, 480 or 481 15 

C. Professional Sequence 25 

1. EXC 310; EDN 335, 471, 472, 473 25 

D. Special Course Requirements 

One half of senior recital 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 196-199 



ART AND MUSIC 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF ASSOCIATE IN ARTS 
(With Concentrations) 

Houn 
\ i. leneral Requirements 

\ir,i I 

l. I NG L01, I02or 192, 201 oi 292 

foe course selected from \ki 2< Ml S200; 

nil 200, 201 

Krea M 

1 approved laboratory science sequence in 

MAI mi and L03oi I95or220or290 10 

\iva 111 

1. His H4 or 115 or 192; HIS 251 or 252 10 

2 POS 113 and one course selected from \\I201; 

1 CO 201, 202; PS\ I01;SOC201 10 

Area V 3 

1. PI 103 or IDS 1 

2. IWo activity courses 2 

l> ( ourses in the Concentration 

\rt 2^ 

1. ARI ill, 112 10 

2. One course selected from: ART 271, 272, 273 5 

V lu o courses selected from: ART 201, 202, 204, 211, 213, 

314, 316, 330, 331,340, 362, 363, 364, 370, 413 10 

Music 2M 

1. MLS 111, 112, 113 9 

2. Applied Music (six hours in one area) 6 

Music Ensemble 256, 254 6 

4 Music History and Literature 8 

5. Piano Proficiency 

6. MUS 000 (Recital Attendance) 

Minor Concentrations 

Minor concentrations in art and music are available through the Department of Art 
and Music. The requirements for each are: 

Hours 
Concentration in Art 2^ 

1. ART 111, 112 10 

2. One course selected from: ART 271, 272, 273 

3. Two courses selected from: ART 201, 202, 204, 211, 213, 

314, 330, 331, 340, 362, 363, 364, 370, 413 10 

Concentration in Music 2^ 

1. MUS 111, 112, 113 9 

2. Applied Music (six hours in one area) 6 

3. Music Ensemble 251 or 254 6 

4. Music History and Literature 8 

5. MUS 000 (recital attendance) 

Art Offerings 

Unless stated otherwise, courses are open to non-art majors. 

ART 111 Basic Design I (4-2-5) 

An introduction to two-dimensional design and graphic communication. 



90 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



ART 112 Basic Design II (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or better in ART 111 or permission of instructor. 
The fundamentals of three-dimensional design introduced through sculptural 
projects in various media. 

ART 200 Introduction to the Visual Arts (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

A study of artistic theories, styles, media and techniques and their application in 

masterworks of art from all ages. Not recommended for art majors. 

ART 201 Painting I (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in ART 111 or ART 213 or permission of the 

instructor. 

A basic course in acrylic or oil painting from observed and secondary sources. 

ART 202 Painting II (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in ART 201 or permission of the instructor. 
A continuation of Painting I with an increasing emphasis on student selected painting 
problems. 

ART 204 Introduction to Photography (4-2-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Introduction to black and white photographic aesthetics and processes. Including 
study of the mechanical-optical functions of cameras and enlargers as well as printing 
and processing of film in a controlled environment. 

ART 211 Graphic Design (4-2-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: ART 1 1 1 or permission of the instructor. 

The fundamentals of visual communication including design, layout, typography and 

reproduction as related to modern advertising techniques. 

ART 213 Drawing I (4-2-5) 

A fundamental course emphasizing representational drawing from still-life, land- 
scape, and figural form. 

ART 215 Computer Art (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: ART 111. 

An introduction to the computer and its use in image making and manipulation, 

and as a medium for graphic design. 

ART 271 History of Art (5-0-5) 

A survey of the visual arts, painting, sculpture, and architecture, in Western 
Civilization from prehistory to the Late Middle Ages. 

ART 272 History of Art II (5-0-5) 

Italian Renaissance through Rococo art. 

ART 273 History of Art HI (5-0-5) 

Modern Art, the late eighteenth through the twentieth centuries. 

ART 303 Oil Painting (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: ART 201 or permission of the instructor. 

Introduction to the techniques and special qualities of oil paint and associated 

variations of the mediums. 

ART 304 Watercolor Painting (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: ART 213 or permission of the instructor. An exploration of traditional 
and experimental approaches to transparent watercolor medium. 

ART 305 Art Criticism (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ART 273 or permission of the instructor. The study and practice of 
visual art criticism in the context of modern critical approaches. 

ART 313 Drawing II (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in ART 213 or permission of the instructor. 
A continuation of Drawing I with emphasis on figuration, composition, and color. 

ART 314 Intermediate Photography (3-3-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: ART 204 or permission of the instructor. 

A continuation of the study of the aesthetics and processes in black and white 

photography. 



ART AND MUSIC 91 



\ki >i^ Color Slide Photography 0-3-5) 

\>> Prerequisite 

\n introduction ti> .it'stht'tu s .uui pnu cssrs ot i olor slulr phnlogr.ipln uu hiding 

>. imcra ivories and composition \ 15mm tingle lens reflex csmeri is required 

\ki 116 Hand ( olorcd and Manipulated SUvei Print (3-3-5) 

Offered on demsnd Prerequisite VR1 204 or permission of the instructor 
Exploration of s variety of media and techniques to enhsneesnd alter a silver print 

\ki 117 Experimentation in Photography (3-3-5) 

Prerequisite \K I 204 oi permission of instructor 

Exploration ofavariet) ol experimental techniques in the camera inthedarl 

and or the surface oi the print 

\ki 320 trtforthel lementary readier (4-2-5) 
Prerequisite Admission to reacherl ducation. 

A stud) with studio experience, oi materials and methods tor tea< King art .it the 
elemental^ school level 

ART 330 Ceramics I (4-2-5) 

Introduction to fundamentals of wheel thrown pottery, handbuilding techniques and 
ceramic sculpture. Emphasis is on decoration, form, t raftsmanship and c reativit) . 
traditional glazing and tiring techniques as well as an exploration into non- 
traditional methods of coloring and construction. 

ART 331 Pottery Techniques (4-2-5) 

Emphasis in on techniques of pottery utilizing the potter's wheel. 

ART 333 Ceramic Sculpture (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Ceramics I or permission or instructor. 

Emphasis is on developing ideas into large scale ceramic sculpture. Individual 
attention and direction is facilitated. Projects may include pottery, the figure, 
abstraction^, wall relief and mixed media construction. 

ART 335 Glaze Experimentation (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: ART 330 or permission of instructor. 

1 his course is designed to teach students about raw materials and chemicals used 

in glazes, glaze formulation, and firing glazes in oxidation, reduction, and raku 

kilns. 

ART 340 Printmaking I (4-2-5) 

An introduction to basic printmaking ideas and terminology. Projects will include one 
or more of the following: linoleum, woodblock, intaglio, silkscreen and non-tradi- 
tional methods of making prints. 

ART 350 Art In the Lower School (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Art education majors only. 

The analysis and evaluation of techniques and materials for teaching art in the 

elementary school. 

ART 351 Art In the Middle and Upper School (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Art education majors only. 

The analysis and evaluation of techniques and materials for teaching art in junior 

and senior high school. 

ART 362 Enameling/Jewelry Making (4-2-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Introduction of process in the production of a variety of enameled art works, and oi 

processes in the making of jewelry, both handmade and cast. 

ART 363 Batik/Textile Design (4-2-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Exploration of a variety of processes used in applying original designs to fabric. 

ART 364 Fibers Construction (4-2-5) 

Offered on demand . 

Development of processes used in on and off techniques in weaving and in contempo- 
rary fiber wall hangings. 



92 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



ART 365 Arts and Crafts (4-2-5) 

An introduction to the terminology and techniques used in a variety of craft media, 
including batik, weaving, and jewelry. 

ART 366 Papermaking (4-2-5) 

An exploration of the processes and techniques used in papermaking. Emphasis 
will be placed on the production of both two-dimensional and three-dimensional 
pieces. 

ART 370 Figure Sculpture I (4-2-5) 

An introduction to basic sculpture ideas, terminology, and processes. Emphasis will 
be placed on working with the human figure utilizing clay and other media. 

ART 371 Sculpture Materials (4-2-5) 

This course is an introduction to additive and subtractive sculpture techniques. 
Emphasis will be placed on a variety of sculptural imagery and media including wood 
construction, carving, and mixed media. 

ART 400 Seminar In Art Education (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Art education majors only. 
A survey of current trends in instructional and research techniques. 

ART 413 Drawing III (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: A grade of "C" or higher in ART 313 or permission of instructor. 
A continuation of Drawing II with increasingly complex problems in concept, 
design, and technique. 

ART 414 Figure Drawing (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Art 313 or permission of instructor. 

The human figure as structure and expressive form in dry and aqueous media. 

ART 462 Museum Studies (4-2-5) 

Spring, 1994. 

A survey of the development of museums in the United States and of the ethics and 
practices of the museum profession, to include collections management, planning, 
outreach, and public education. 

ART 470 Senior Portfolio (1-6-5) 

Each student will develop a body of work in the medium of choice that demonstrates 
a consistent theme or approach. This course is taken in preparation for the Senior 
Portfolio Review and Exhibition. 

ART 489 Selected Studies In Art (V-V(l-5)) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Varied course offerings designed to meet special institutional and community needs. 

May be repeated for credit. 

ART 490 Directed Individual Study (V-V-Q-5)) 

Prerequisite: See departmental statement. 

ART 491 Internship (V-V-(l-4-5)) 

Offered by special arrangement. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department 
head and an overall grade point average of 2.5. 

The student will pursue an individually designed course project involving off -campus 
study, work, and / or research. Projects usually encompass the entire academic quarter 
and are under the joint supervision of the sponsoring institution and his/her 
faculty supervisor. 

ART 495 Special Problems (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: 15 hours of coursework in a selected studio area. 

The special problems courses consisting of visual arts studies to be mutually agreed 

upon by consultation between the instructor and student. 



ART AND MUSIC 



93 



Applied Music Offerings 
I nless sfc 
MUS I |Q 



\n s ini 



\1l s 240 



ML S340 



MLS 440 



ited otherwise, courses are open to non musu majoi 

Applied \iusu (one i redit) 

Prerequisite Sufficient musu background, determined b) audition of Ml s 1 1" 
Onetwent) five minute lesson pei week in brass, organ, percussion, piai 
voice or woodwinds Applicable to a musi< degree onl) for a secondary applied 
v redit Ma) be repeated foi i redil 

Applied Musii (two credits) 

Prerequisite <■ )pentomusk majorsand a limited number of non majorsb) audition onl) 
Private and J.iss instruction in brass, organ, p»'i» ussion, piano, string 
woodwinds Ma) be repeated for credit 

Applied Music (two credits) 

Prerequisite t ompetenc) at the Ml s 140 \e\ el as determined b) jur) examination 

Music majors only. 

Private and class instruction in brass, organ, percussion, piano, strings, voice <»r 

woodwinds. Ma) be repeated for credit. 

Applied Music (two credits) 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Rising Junior Applied Musu I xamination. 

Music majors only. 

Private and class instruction in brass, organ, percussion, piano, strings, voice or 

woodwinds. Ma) be repeated forcredit. 

Applied Music (two credits) 

Prerequisite: Competency at the NILS 340 level as determined by |urv examination. 

Music majors only 

Private and class instruction in brass, organ, percussion, piano, strings, vi 

woodwinds. May be repeated forcredit. 



Music Offerings 

MUS 000 Recital Attendance (0-V-0) 

A requirement for music majors and iriinors which consistsof attendance atadesignated 
number of concerts recitals each quarter. 

MUS 110 Basic Music Theory (3-0-3) 

An introduction to music theory for students needing skills for MUS 1 1 1 . May not be 

used forcredit toward a degree in music. 

MUS 111 Elementary Theory I (3-2-3) 

Fall. Prerequisite: MLS 1 10 or equivalent by examination. 
An introduction to the basic theoretical principles of music including sightsinging, ear- 
training and keyboard harmony. 

MUS 112 Elementary Theory II (3-2-3) 

Winter. Prerequisite: A grade of"C"or higher in MLS 1 1 1 or permission of instructor. 

A continuation of MLS 1 1 1 with emphasis on part-writing and diatonic material. 

MUS 113 Elementary Theory III (3-2-3) 

Spring. Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in MUS 112 or permission of instructor. 
A continuation of MLS 1 12 introducing seventh chords and diatonic modulation. 

MUS 114 Jazz Improvisation I (2-0-2) 

Ottered on demand. Prerequisite: MLS 1 1 3 or permission of instructor. 

Emphasis on basic jazz literature, chord symbol, melodic patterns, ear training, 
melodic concepts and analysis of improvised solos. 

MUS 200 Introduction to Music Literature (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

A course designed to help the student understand music by means of analysis of style, 

forms, and media of musical expression. 



94 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



MUS 201 Understanding Jazz (3-0-3) 

Offered OH demand. 

A non-technical survey of jazz performers and styles with emphasis on recorded 
literature. The course will examine elements of jazz such as improvisation, instrumen- 
tation and rhythm and trace their development from New Orleans to contemporary 
fusion music. 

MUS 202 Survey of Rock Music (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. 

A non-technical survey of rock music and its styles with emphasis on recorded 

literature. 

MUS 203 Popular Music In 20th Century America (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. 

A survey of popular music from ragtime to present. Examination of popular music and 

its relationship to American culture. 

MUS 211 Intermediate Theory I (3-2-3) 

Fall. Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in MUS 113 or permission of instructor. 
A continuation of MUS 113 with emphasis on chromatic harmony. 

MUS 212 Intermediate Theory II (3-2-3) 

Winter. Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in MUS 21 1 or permission of instructor. 
A continuation of MUS 21 1 . 

MUS 213 Intermediate Theory III (3-2-3) 

Spring. Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in MUS 21 2 or permission of instructor. 
A continuation of MUS 212 with emphasis on twentieth century techniques. 

MUS 214 Jazz Improvisation II (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: MUS 114 or permission of the instructor. 

Emphasis on the analysis and performance of intermediate jazz literature and 

composition in contemporary styles. 

MUS 224 Class Guitar (0-2-1) 

Offered on demand. 

Designed for the development of basic skills in playing the guitar for accompanying. 

Focuses on chord ed styles and their application to music such as folk songs and popular 

music. 

MUS 226 Class Piano I, II, III (0-2-1) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Students enrolling in 
II or III must have received a grade of "C" or higher in the preceding class. 
A study of keyboard techniques with emphasis on the skills needed to fulfill the 
piano proficiency requirement. 

MUS 227 Class Voice (0-2-1) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Music major status or permission of the instructor. 
A study of voice production techniques with practical application to standard song 
literature. Not open to students whose principal instrument is voice. 

MUS 228 Class Piano for Non-Music Majors (0-2-1) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 
An applied study of keyboard literature and techniques at the beginning and 
elementary levels. An elective course, open only to non-music majors, which meets 
in the electronic piano laboratory. May be repeated for credit. 

MUS 236 Brass Methods (0-2) 

Offered on demand. Music majors only. 

An introduction to the principles of brass instrument performance and pedagogy. 

MUS 237 Woodwind Methods (0-4-2) 

Offered on demand. Music majors only. 

An introduction to theprinciples of woodwind instrument performance and pedagogy. 

MUS 238 Percussion Methods (0-4-2) 

Offered on demand. Music majors only. 

An introduction to the principles of percussion instrument performance and pedagogy. 



ART AND MUSIC 



95 



\u s 239 String Methods (0- 1 2) 

Offered on demand Musi< majors onl) 

An introduction to the print iples of string instrument performance and ; ■ 

Ml s 290 Pep Band (0-2-1) 

l .ill Winter ( )pen to qualified students 

>up to provide spirit music at school a thlebx function 

.lit .it most, tour times 

\u s 251 ( oncert Band (0-2-1) 
( >pen to qualified students. 

Repertoire to be sele< ted from the standard literature t.>r s\ mphonk band Publu 
perfbrrnaiM es are i pari o( the course requireme n t 

Ml S252 jfazz l nsemblc (0-2-1) 
Open to qualified students 

Repe rto ire to be selected from a \ arietyol jazzstylesand periods. Public perforn 
are i part o( the course requirement 

MUS 253 Armstrong Singers (0-2-1) 

Membership open to all students by audition. |a//C hoir Public performances are a 
part of the course requirement. 

Ml S254 Concert Choir (0-3-1) 

Membership open to all students. Ability to read music desired but not required. 
Repertoire to be selected each quarter from the standard choral concert literature. 
I here will bo public performances each quarter. 

MUS255 Chamber Ensemble (0-2-1) 
Offered on demand. 

Open to all qualified students in the perform a nee media of brass, woodwind, string, 
keyboard, > oice.and percussion instruments. 

MUS 256 Wind Ensemble (0-3-1) 

Offered on demand. Permission of instructor only 

Repertoire to be selected from the standard wind ensemble literature. Public 
performances are part of the course requirement. 
MUS 257 Opera Workshop (0-2-1) 

Offered on demand. Preparation and pe rfor mance of work or excerpts of works from 

the operatic repertoire. 

MUS 258 Keyboard Accompanying (1-2-2) 

Offered on demand. Music majors only. 

A study o\ the basic principles of accompaniment. 

MUS 259 Oratorio Chorus (0-2-1) 

Membership open to all. 

Evening rehearsals. Literature to be selected from the larger choral works. Abilitv 

to read music not required. Public performances are part of the course requirement. 

MUS 281 Conducting (3-0-3) 

Fall. Prerequisite: MLS 1 13. Music majors only. 

An introduction to the techniques of conducting and interpretation. 

MUS 312 Form and Analysis (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 213. Music majors only. 

The studv of the principles of form in music and techniques oi harmonic analysis. 

MUS 313 English and Italian Lyric Diction and Repertoire (2-0-2) 
Prerequisite: Musk Majors Only 

A study of the International Phonetic Alphabet, the phonetics of English and Italian 
for singing and a survey of representative English and Italian vocal repertoire. 

MUS 314 German Lyric Diction and Repertoire (2-0-2) 
Prerequisite: MUS 2 17, music majors only 

Orientation to the phonetics of German for singing by means of the International 
Phonetic Alphabet and a survey of representative German vocal repertoire. 



96 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



MUS 315 French Lyric Diction and Repertoire (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: MUS 217, music majors only. 

Orientation to the phonetics of French for singing by means of the International 

Phonetic Alphabet and a survey of representative French vocal repertoire. 

MUS 320 Music for the Elementary Teacher (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

A study of the materials and methods for teaching general music in the elementary 

classroom. Not for music majors. 

MUS 330 Music In the Lower School (4-0-4) 

Music majors only. 

A course for music majors emphasizing analysis and evaluation of techniques and 

materials for teaching music in the lower school. 

MUS 331 Music In the Middle and Upper School (4-0-4) 

Music majors only. 

A course for music majors emphasizing analysis and evaluation of techniques and 

materials for teaching music in the middle and senior high schools. 

MUS 352 Band Methods (2-0-2) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Music majors only. 

A course dealing with the organization, maintenance and development of school 

instrumental ensembles. 

MUS 353 Choral Methods (2-0-2) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 227. Music majors only. 
A course dealing with the organization and development of school choral organiza- 
tions, problems of choral singing, and fundamentals of choral conducting. 

MUS 361 Orchestration and Arranging (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 213. Music majors only. 

An introduction to the techniques of arranging and scoring for vocal and instrumental 

ensembles. 

MUS 371 Music History I (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 200 and MUS 113. 

The history of music in Western Civilization from its origins through the Renais- 
sance. 

MUS 372 Music History II (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 200 and MUS 113. 

The history of music in Western Civilization in the Baroque and Classic Periods. 

MUS 373 Music History III (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 200 and MUS 113. 

The history of music in Western Civilization in the Romantic Period and in the 20th 

century. 

MUS 411 Composition (V-V-2) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 213. Music majors only. May be repeated for 
credit. 

MUS 412 Counterpoint (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 213. Music majors only. 
A study of contrapuntal practices of 18th century music. 

MUS 416 Topics In Instrumental Repertoire and 
Pedagogical Techniques (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand . Junior status or permission of the instructor. May be repeated for 
credit as topics vary. 

A survey of instrumental literature and teaching techniques for brass, guitar, 
percussion, or woodwind instruments. 

MUS 420 Piano Literature I (3-0-3) 

A survey of the historical, stylistic, formal, and aesthetic features of piano literature 
of the Baroque and Classic periods. 



ART AND MUSIC 






\u s i:i Piano I Iterature 11(3-0 \) 

\ siii\ ,-\ of the historical, stylistic .formal, and aestheti< featu 
of the Rom ant i< and( ontemporar) peril 

Ml S 122 Opera I Iterahiw I ; 

red on demand Prerequisite Ml S200 
\ surve) >'t the historical stylistic formal, and aesthetii >1 the lyru 

theatre from Baroque to the present 

\u s 123 ( horml Repertoire I M)-3) 

Offered on demand Prerequisite funioi status oi permission of the ins tructoi 

majors onl) 

\ sun ej ol the literature ol i horal ensemble 

Ml S4M Band Repertoire (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Junior status or permission ol theinstrut tor Musi, 

majors onl) 

A surve) ol the literature ot band and wind ensemble. 

MUS425 Piano Pedagogy (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand Prerequisite: Musk majors onl) 

\ stud) ol pedagogical techniques ol the piano and a sun e) ol literature suited t » >r 
tea< hing purposes. 

MUS42" V«*al Pedagogy (3-0-3) 
^ >ffered on demand. 

A stud) ol pedagogical techniques ol the \ oice and a sur\ ey of literature suited tor 
teaching purposes. 

MUS428 Marching Band Techniques (2-0-2) 

Offered on J cm and. Prerequisite: Music majors only or permission ol the instructor. 
A stud) of techniques used inshow design and instruction of thehighschool inarching 
band. 

MUS 429 Art Song (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite NIL'S 2(H). 

A survey of the historical, stylistic, formal, and aesthetic features ol the art song 

from its origins to the present da) 

NILS 432 Symphonic Music Literature (3-0-3) 
entered on demand. Prerequisite MUS 200. 

A surve) ol the historical, stylistic, formal, and aesthetic features ©1 symphonic 
music from its origins to the present d.w . 

MUS 433 Instrumental Chamber Music Literature (3-0-3) 
Ottered on demand. Prerequisite MUS 200. 

A survey of the historical, stylistic, formal, and aesthetic features of instrumental 
chamber music from its origins to the present da) . 

MUS 480 Advanced Choral Conducting (3-0-3) 

Ottered on demand. Prerequisites:. MUS 281, 312,361. Music majors only. 
Advanced techniques for the choral conductor. 

MUS 481 Advanced Instrumental Conducting (3-0-3) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: MUS 281, 312, 261. Music majors only. 
Advanced techniques for the instrumental conductor. 

MUS 489 Selected Studies In Music (V-V-U-5)) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Varied course offerings designed to meet special institutional and community needs. 

May be repeated tor credit. 

MUS 490 Directed Individual Study (V-V-d-5)) 

Prerequisite: See departmental statement. Music majors only. 



98 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



MUS 491 Internship (V-V-(l-5)) 

Offered by special arrangement. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department 

head and an overall grade point average of 2.5. 

The student will pursue an individually designed course project involving off-campus 

study, work, and /or research. Projects usually encompass the entire academic quarter 

and are under the joint supervision of the sponsoring institution and his/her faculty 

supervisor. 

Biology 

Faculty 

Relyea, Kenneth, Department Head 
Awong-Taylor, Judy Larson, Brett 

* Beumer, Ronald Smith, Pamela 
Brower, Moonyean Thorne, Francis 
Guillou, Laurent Wynn, Gail 
Kempke, Suzanne 

* Graduate Faculty 

The major in biology consists of BIO 101, BIO 102, BOT 203 and ZOO 204, and at least 
40 quarter hours credit in biology courses (BIO, BOT, ZOO) numbered 300 or above. 
The majority of the courses in the major numbered 300 or above must be taken in the 
Biology Department at Armstrong State College. 

Each student acquiring a major in biology must include in his/her program the 
following courses: BIO 360, 370, 480; BOT 410 or ZOO 410; one course in botany numbered 
300 or above, other than BOT 410; and one course in zoology numbered 300 or above, 
other than ZOO 410. If credit for any of the first three required units is transferred to 
Armstrong from another college, the department may require that it be validated by 
examination. 

In addition, biology majors must complete elementary statistics and the course 
sequence in organic chemistry (15 quarter hours). The course in general college physics 
(15 quarter hours) is strongly recommended and should be considered essential for 
those who expect to continue the study of biology beyond the B.S. degree. 

To be eligible for a B.S. degree in biology the student must have a grade of at least 
"C" for all biology courses. 

Beginning students who have successfully completed strong courses in biology in 
high school may take examinations for advanced placement or for credit for BIO 101 
and/or 102. Arrangements to take these examinations may be made with the head of 
the department. 

In order to receive Core Curriculum credits for the biology laboratory science 
sequence by taking biology in the Savannah State-Armstrong exchange program, a 
student must take the ENTIRE sequence of ten quarter hours either at Armstrong State 
College or at Savannah State College. 

By careful use of electives a student majoring in biology may concurrently acquire 
a second major in chemistry (i.e., he or she may take a "double major"). This program 
is recommended for preprofessional students. It does require 10 to 20 quarter hours 
credit above the minimum required for graduation. Ask the department head for 
additional information. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A 
MAJOR IN BIOLOGY 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 



BIOLOGY 99 



\UM II 

I BIO L01 102 10 

\i \i 101 (oi I n examination allows) and \i \: 

\UM ill 

1 His n-i u5oi 192 POS 113 15 

2 One course from \\1 201 l C O201 

\iea l\ 

1 C III BCT1 203 and ZOO 204 

[Wo courses from natural m iences, Mathemari< s, foreign language 10 

\iea \ 

1 PI L03or L08and 1 17 or 166 

2 l hree acth it) courses 

State Requirement: I lis 251 oi 252 

B ( ourses in me Major I ield 

1. BIO HO, >70.4si).BOI 410orZOO410 20 

2 I lectives at the 300-400 level selected from biology, botany, 
entomology, and zoology. 1 lectives must include one HOI 
course other than B( ) I 410 and one ZOO course other than 

ZOO 410 20 

( ( ourses in Related Fields 15 

C HI J41, 342, J43 15 

n. I lectives J5 

E. Regents' ^nd I \it Examinations o 

TOTAL 191 
SP1 CIA1 NOTES: 

(1) Biology majors should take BIO 101 and BIO 102 during the freshman year, ^nd BO I 
203 and ZlX^ 204 during the sophomore year. CHE 12S and 129 should be completed 

b\ the end of spring quarter of the sophomore \ ear. 

(2) I he biology major should complete organic chemistry (CHI- 341, 342, 343) no later 
than the end of the junior year as it is prerequisite or corequisite to all physiolog) 
COU1 

(3) Students who may wish to enter graduate school are advised that PHY 211,212,213, 
and foreign language to third quarter proficiency should be considered essential. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A 
MAJOR IN BIOLOGY (with teacher certification) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 1 5 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 103, or 206 5 

2. MAT 220 5 

3. BIO 101; 102 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; 

POS 113 15 

2. PSY101 

Area IV 30 

1. CHE 128, 129; ZOO 204; MAT 103 20 

2. One course from: ANT 201; ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 3 

3. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 5 



100 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 or 166 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement: HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Courses in the Major Field 45 

1. BIO 360, 370, 480; BOT 203 20 

2. BOT 410 or ZOO 410 5 

3. Electives at the 300-400 level selected from botany and zoology 20 

C. Courses in Related Fields 30 

1. CHE 341, 342, 343 15 

2. Three of AST 301, MET 301, GEO 301, OCE 301, or PHY 211, 212, 213 15 

D. Professional Sequence 40 

1. EDN 200; EXC 310, EDN 335, 447, 471, 472, 473 35 

2. PSY 201 or EDN 201 5 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 216 

MINOR CONCENTRATIONS 

The following minor concentrations are available from the Department of Biology. For 
minors, the student must earn a grade of "C" or better in all courses offered for the minor. 
Students should be aware that BIO 101, 102 are pre-requisite to all courses listed below. 
The minors and their requirements are: 

Hours 

Biology 20 

1. 20 hours of upper division BIO courses chosen from BIO 310, 351, 
352, 353, 358, 360, 370, 380, 410, 450, 460, 480 
Botany 20 

1. BOT 203 5 

2. 3 courses from BOT 305, 323, 410, 425 15 

Zoology 20 

1. ZOO 204 5 

2. 3 courses from ZOO 301, 326, 355, 356, 372, 410, 429, 435 15 

Human Biologv 20 

1. BIO 210 or ZOO 215 5 

2. 3 courses from BIO 310, 351, 353, 370, 380, ZOO 330 15 

Pre-Professional Programs 

Pre Medical/Pre Dental/Pre Veterinarial. Students majoring in biology may concur- 
rently complete all premedical, predental, and preveterinarial requirements. 

Secondary Teaching Certificate in Biology. Students may major in Biology and 
obtain teaching certification. 

Internships. The Department offers a number of internship options in the areas of 
research, applied biology, and environmental education. It also offers programs in which 
students can work with physicians, veterinarians, and dentists. 

Pre-forestry program with the University of Georgia. A student may complete 
two years of a pre-forestry curriculum at Armstrong, then transfer to the University 
of Georgia. After two additional years of coursework, the student may receive a B.S. 
in Forest Resources. 

Pre-forestry/Environmental Management Affiliation with Duke University. In 
this program, a student may complete three years of study at Armstrong and then may 
apply for admission to the Duke program. If accepted, the student may complete two 
additional years at Duke. Upon successfully completing the first year at Duke, the 
student will receive a B.S. in Biology from Armstrong; after successful completion of the 



BIOLOGY 101 






second yeta the itudenl will receive a Mastei ol s « iencc degree in eithei f< 
i-in ironmental management from I Kike I niversit) 

Biotechnology. Students seeking to attain biotechnolog) credentials appealii 
employers in genetic technolog) industries forensic science pharmaceuticals, agricuJ 
hire aquaculture and graduate programs ma) considei this track within th< 
Major Pre medical students especially those considering biomedical research, will find 
this tra< k attra< live rhe student completes the same required courses (BIO 101, 102,601 

BIO 160 • \ND EITHER BOT 410 OR ZOO H0)asallotrv i 

Majors, but then chooses BIO 151, ; ^ ; and 460 and one elective chosen rromBK 
BQ1 110 ZOO 172 110 429 oi • 

Scholarships In Biology 

rhe department offers a limited number ol scholarships to Biolog) majors 
Interested students are invited to inquire in tin- department office for details. 

Biology Honors 

Students who perform independent biological research and submit acceptable oral 
and written reports to a departmental committee may be eligible to have "graduated 
with departmental honors" noted on their official academic records. 

To qualif) for this honor, students must have at the time of application: 120-150 
quarter hours oi course work, a minimum college GPA ol 5.3; a minimum biology c IPA 
Of ; 5 with no grade lower than "C"; ,md three or more 300-41)0 level course completed 

The committee will consist oi three biolog) faculty, adding where applicable a 
biologist from outside the college. The committee will examine students' proposals 
before projects are undertaken ,md evaluate the projects at their completion. 

Biology Offerings 

BIO 101 Principles of Biology I (4-3-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101. 
Origin and characteristics of living systems, structure and function of cells, biologi- 
cal chemistry, the five kingdom concept (with emphasis on plants), basic principles 
and global aspects of ecology. 

BIO 102 Principles of Biology II (4-3-5) 

entered each quarter. Prerequisite: BIO 101. 

Mendelian and modern genetics; evolutionary mechanisms; survey of the animal 
kingdom; structure, function and development of animal organ systems, with 
emphasis on vertebrates. 

BIO 210 Microorganisms and Disease (4-3-5) 

Ottered each quarter. Prerequisites: CHE 201 or 122 and ZOO 209. 
An introduction to the stud v of microorganisms with prima r\ emphasis on bacteria. 
The morphology, life history, and importance to public health o\ representative 
bacteria, fungi, viruses, and protozoa are considered. Credit for this course may not 
be applied toward a major in biology. 

BIO 310 Man and the Environment (5-0-5) 

Spring or Winter. Prerequisite: Completion of 75 quarter hours credit in college 
course- 
Consideration of the interactions between humans and the support systems of the 
earth which are essential to their existence. Credit tor this course may not be applied 
toward a major in biology. 

BIO 351 Bacteriology (3-4-5) 

Fall. Prerequisites 10 hours of biological science, CHE 128-12^. 

A study of the morphology, ecology, classification, and genetics oi the bacteria and 

related micro-organisms, including the y iruses. 



102 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



BIO 352 Medical Microbiology (3-4-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: BIO 351 and permission of the instructor. 

A comprehensive study of the disease-causing microbes in terms of their diagnosis, 

pathology, and epidemiology. 

BIO 353 Immunology and Serology (3-4-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: CHE 128 and 129 or permission of instructor and department 
head. 

A fundamental study of humoral and cellular immunity, the structure and biosynthe- 
sis of antibodies, and the interactions between antigens and antibodies. Consideration 
will be given to allergic states and other immunological diseases. 

BIO 358 Histological Technique (0-10-5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: BIO 101, and 102. 

Principles and methods of killing, fixing, embedding, sectioning, staining, and 

mounting plant and animal materials for study. 

BIO 360 Cell Structure and Function (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: BIO 102, CHE 128, 129 

An introduction to cell biology including the study of cell ultrastructure, the major 

physiological processes, cell reproduction and cell differentiation. 

BIO 370 Genetics (3-4-5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: BIO 101, BIO 102 or 112, CHE 128, 129; BIO 351 and junior status 

recommended. 

An introduction to the principles of biological inheritance. 

BIO 380 Human Genetic (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: BIO 101-102 or ZOO 208-209 and CHE 128-129 or CHE 201-202, or CHE 

121-122. 

An introduction to human inheritance including gene transmission, gene effects upon 

metabolism, population and quantitative genetics, genetics of sex-determination, 

pedigree analysis, eugenics, and genetic screening and counseling. 

BIO 410 Cellular Physiology (3-4-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: At least third quarter junior status; two courses in 
biology numbered 300 or above; and organic chemistry. 

A consideration of the functional relationships between microscopic anatomy and cell 
chemistry, emphasizing permeability, metabolism, and growth. 

BIO 450 Evolution (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: Major in biology (at least 15 qtr. hrs. credit in biology courses 

numbered 300 or above). 

Modern concepts in organic evolution. 

BIO 460 Molecular Genetics (4-4-5) 

Prerequisite: BOT 203, ZOO 204, BIO 360, and CHE 341. 

Detailed study of gene structure and the control of gene expression in prokaryotic, 
eukaryotic and viral systems, including topics such as replication, recombination, 
repair, mutagenesis of DNA and RNA synthesis. Recombinant DNA techniques 
and genetic engineering will be introduced. 

BIO 470/ 

471/472 Seminar (1-0-1) 

Prerequisite: Open to junior and senior Biology majors. 

Library research, class presentations, and discussions in selected areas of Biology. 

BIO 480 General Ecology (3-4-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: Three courses in biology numbered 300 or above. 

A survey of the principles of ecology and their application to the welfare of humans, 

coordinated with a study of populations and communities in the field. 

BIO 481 Biology of Marine Organisms (4-3-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: BOT 203, ZOO 204. 

Study of the relationship between organisms and abiotic and biotic features of the 

marine environment. Emphasis on local marine ecosystems. Field trips. 



ZOOLOGY 103 



BIO 190 Research (\ -\ M 

Offered on demand Prerequisites Vt least 20 hours credit in b 

IOOoi ibovc a B average in biolog) courses and in overa I h 

head igree m enl *>t .1 M.xt tnembei tosupen ise work 

Problems to be assigned and work directed by a member of the department 

re se arch including literature search* * 1 * - 1 *. l and 01 laboratory ii 

presentation of an acceptable written report of results <• redit will depend upon the 

work to be done Both v redil and proposed w >>i k must !>«• approved in 

writing, b) thefacult) member to supervise the work and b) the department 

BIO 495/496 Internship <\ -V-11-^) 

Offered ea< h quarter Prerequisites lunior standing and permission of the Department 

Head 

rhe student will be engaged in a biological project sponsored by an outside agi 

1 he project will be sele< ted, supen ised, evaluated, and < redit hours determined in 

the student's facult) ad\ isor in consultation with tin- outside agent \ l he student 

must make application during the quarter preceding the internship No more than 5 

(five) hours ma) be counted toward the major. 

Botany Offerings 

BOT 201 Principles of Horticulture (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: None. 

Introduction to basic gardening principles with emphasis on plant growth and 
de\ elopment as responses to \ arying environmental conditions. fopicstobean ered 
include plant classification growth and development, environment, propagation, 
disease ^nd pest control. This course may be applied as elective credit towards the 
B s degree in biology 

BOT203 Survey of the Plant Kingdom (3-4-5) 
Spring' Prerequisites: BIO 101 and 102. 

Morphology anol pin logen) of the divisions of the plant kingdom, with emphasis 
upon the evolution of the land flora 

BOT305 Identification of Flowering Plants (0-10-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: 15 quarter hours of biology. 

Studies in the identification of plants with emphasis on local flora. 

BOT323 Plant Anatomy (3-4-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: 15 quarter hours of biologx 

The origin and development of the organs and tissue systems of vascular plants, and 

a comparative study o\ the structure o\ roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and fruits. 

BOT410 Plant Physiology (3-4-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: 15 quarter hours of biology. 

A survey of physiologic processes occurring in plants and the conditions which affect 

these processes. 

BOT 425 Plant Morphology (3-4-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: BOT 323. 

Comparand e studies of vascular plants with emphasis on form, structure, reproduc- 
tion, and evolutionary relationships. 

Zoology Offerings 

ZOO 204 Survey of the Animal Kingdom (3-4-5) 

Fall. Prerequisites: BIO 101, 102. 

An evolutionary survey of the major animal phyla. 

ZOO 208 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4-2-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Eligibility for EW. 101 and a passing grade in 
High School chemist r\ or CHE 201 (if the student has passed High School chemistry 
then CHE 201 is a co-requisite for ZOO 208), or CHE 121-122, or 128- 1 2 
A basic course considering the gross anatomv, histology, and pin siologv of the human 
organ systems. Intended primarily for majors in health sciences, credit for this course 
may not be applied toward a major in biology. 



104 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



ZOO 209 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4-2-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: ZOO 208 and completion of the chemistry 
prerequisite or co-requisite for ZOO 208. 

A continuation of the basic course considering the anatomy and physiology of the 
human. Credit may not be applied toward a major in biology. 

ZOO 211 Cardiopulmonary Anatomy and Physiology (2-2-3) 

Spring. Prerequisite: ZOO 209. 

The cardiopulmonary system is studied with special emphasis on functional 
anatomy. The physiology of the heart, the control of circulation, respiration, and 
blood pressure, and particlemovementacrossmembranesarealsostudied. Intended 
primarily for majors in health sciences; credit for this course may not be applied 
toward a major in biology. 

ZOO 215 Human Physiology and Disease (4-2-5) 

Spring. Prerequisites: ZOO 208 and 209 or other acceptable courses inhuman, general, 
or vertebrate physiology. 

An introductory consideration of disease as disruption of physiological homeostasis. 
Initial emphasis is placed on normal function, control, and enyironment of cells as a 
basis for understanding cellular and systemic responses to agents of injury and 
organismic effects of those responses. Intended primarily for majors in health sciences. 

ZOO 301 Introductory Entomology (3-4-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: BIO 101 and 102. 

An introduction to the study of insects — their structure, identification and biology. 

ZOO 326 Invertebrate Zoology (3-4-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: ZOO 204. 

A study of the structure, body functions, interrelations, and natural history of the 

major inyertebrate groups. 

ZOO 330 Fundamentals of Nutrition (5-0-5) 

Winter, alternate years. Prerequisites: BIO 101 102 or ZOO 208-209, and CHE 121-122 
or CHE 201. 

Biological bases of animal, including human, nutrition; sources and biological 
utilization and functions of nutrients. 

ZOO 354 Natural History of Vertebrate Animals (4-3-5) 

Fall, alternate years. Prerequisite: ZOO 204. 

Study of life histories, taxonomy, evolution, and adaptations of vertebrate animals 
with emphasis on identification and examination of local vertebrates through field 
oriented labs. 

ZOO 355 Embrvology (4-3-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: ZOO 204. 

An elementary course in embryology in which the chick is used to illustrate the basic 

principles of developmental anatomy. 

ZOO 356 Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates (3-6-6) 

Winter. Prerequisite: ZOO 204. 

A study of the anatomy and evolution of the organ systems of the vertebrates. 

ZOO 357 Animal Histology (3-4-5) 
Winter. Prerequisite: ZOO 204. 
A study of the tissues and their organization into organs and organ systems in animals. 

ZOO 372 Parasitology (3-4-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: ZOO 204. 

A comparative study of the internal and external parasites of man and other animals. 

ZOO 410 General Vertebrate Physiology (3-4-5) 

Fall. Prerequisites: Junior status, including 15 hours of biology; Organic Chemistry 

(may be taken concurrently). 

An introduction to the general physiologic processes of the vertebrates. 

ZOO 429 Endocrinology (4-3-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: ZOO 410 or other acceptable physiology course. 
Physiology of the endocrine glands, their control of metabolism and reproductive 
cycles. 



CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 105 



ZOO 435 < omparativc Physiolog) (3-4-5) 

w intei alternate \ e 

mil c hemistr) (ma) be taken concurrently) 
Studies in various groups of animals of the function I in the 

maintenance of homeostasis under varying conditions within i 
reactions of tissues and systems under latx 

Chemistry and Physics 
I acuity 

I [arris, 1 lenr) I department I lead 
Brewer, |ohn << oordinatoi of i hemistr) 

Baker, fulia Kolodn) , Robert 

Brush, Sabitra I yrnch, Will 

Butler, I rank Mac< lowan, c atherine 

In rd, fames Martin, Keith 

Carpenter, Suzanne Murray, I ri< 

* 1 [izer, rodd Popieniek, Paul 

Ki\ rtes, 1 eon ' \\ hiten, Morns 

Zipperer, W.C. 
■ Graduate Facult) 

rhe department offers majors in chemistr) and in the physical sciences. Minor 
concentrations arc offered in chemistry, engineering studies, physical science, and 
physics, rhe department sponsors the Engineering Studies Program to facilitate the 
transfer of students into engineering programs. 

The major in chemistr) is designed to give depth in the fields of chemistry, yet is 
flexible enough to accommodate a range of career goals. Students majoring in 
chemistry may concurrently complete all pre-medical, pre-dental, and pre-veterinary 
requirements ^nd all requirements for secondary teaching certification in chemistr) , A 
grade of "C" or better in all chemistry courses applied toward the major, and the 
SSful completion of the chemistry exit exam are graduation requirements. 

The major in ph\ sical sciences is designed to give a broad foundation in the fields of 
ph) sics and engineering with enough flexibility to support a range of career goals from 
industrial employment to graduate work. 

I he department participates m the Dual Degree Program of Armstrong State College 
under which students may earn simultaneously the l>.S. degree with a major in chemistr) 
or physical sciences from Armstrong and the baccalaureate in a field of engineering from 
the Georgia Institute of lechnologv or onv of several other participating schools. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A 
MAJOR IN CHEMISTRY 

Hours 

A i leneral Requirements 101 

Area I 20 

ENG 101, 102 or 192,201 or 292 1- 

One course selected from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MLS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area 11 20 

MAT 101, 103 hi 

PI IV 21 1. 212 or 217*, 218* 10 

Area III 20 

HIS 114, 113 or 192 10 

POS113 5 

One course selected from: ANT 201, ECO 201, 202; PSY 101; SOC 201 5 



106 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Area IV 30 

CHE 128, 129, 211 15 

MAT 206 5 

Computer Science or Mathematics or Natural Science 5 

Area V 6 

PE 166 and 103 or 108 3 

Three activity courses 3 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Major Field Requirements 45 

CHE 341, 342, 343, 350, 380, 491 27 

Approved 300-400 level chemistry courses 18 

C. Related Field Requirements 15 

PHY 312 5 

CS 115, 116, 120, or 142, 5 

Additional course in Computer 

Science, Mathematics, or Natural Sciences 5 

D. Electives 30 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 
^Recommended sequence. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A 
MAJOR IN CHEMISTRY (with teacher certification) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

One course selected from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

MAT 101, 103 10 

CHE 128, 129 10 

Area III 20 

HIS 114, 115 or 192 10 

POS113 5 

PSY101 5 

Area IV 30 

CHE 211 5 

PHY 211, 212, 213, or 217, 218, 219 15 

MAT 206 5 

CS 115 or 116 5 

AreaV 11 

PE 166 and 103 or 108 3 

Three activity courses 3 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Major Field Requirements 45 

CHE 341, 342, 343, 350, 380, 491 27 

CHE 461 5 

Approved 300-400 level chemistry courses 13 



CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 107 



i Related I ield Requirements 

PHi 112 

BIO 101 102 10 

One course selected from \S\ 101 Gl I 101 11 
u I 101 
I > Professional sequence 

f l>\ 200, l K( 110, I DN 

PSi 201 oi l DN 201 
! Regents I xamination and I Kit I laminations 

ioi \i 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
WITH A MAJOR IN PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

Hours 

\ ^ leneral Requirements 104 

Area I 20 

1. BNG 101. 102 or 192,201 or 292 15 

: ^ toe course selected from: ARI 200. 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; 

PHI 201 

Area II 20 

1. MAI L03 ( 206 10 

2. CHE 12S, 129 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192 10 

2. POS 113 5 

3. One course selected from: ANT 201; ECO 201, 202; GEO 212; 

PSY 101; SOC 201 5 

Area IV 

1. PHY 217, 218, 219 L8 

2. MAT 207, 208, 216 15 

Area V 11 

1. PE 166 and PE 103 or 108 3 

Three (3) activity courses 3 

2. HIS 251 or 252..'. 5 

B. Major Field Requirements 

PHY 417 or EGR 221 (Mechanics) 5 

PHY 330 or CHE 491 (Thermodynamics) 5 

PHY 380 (Intermediate Modern) 5 

PHY 310 (Circuit Analysis) 5 

PHY 312 (Digital Electronics) 5 

PHY 412 (Scientific Measurements with Digital Interfacing) 5 

Five hours selected from: PHY 322 (Deformable Bodies), 

PHY 323 (Fluids), PHY 490 (Special Topics) or PHY 496 

(Internship) 5 

C. Related Field Requirements 28 

MAT 309, 341 10 

CS142 

EGR 171, 220 - 

ENG372 5 

D. Electives 25 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 



TOTAL 19 



108 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Minor Concentrations 

The minor in Chemistry requires twenty credit hours with grades of "C" or better in 
upper division chemistry courses. 

The minor in Engineering Studies requires EGR 100, 171, 220, 221, plus 10 hours 
chosen from upper division engineering electives for a total of 26 quarter credit hours. 
A grade of at least "C" in each course is required. 

The minor in Physics requires twentv-three credit hours from courses designated 
as physics numbered 211 or higher. A grade of "C" or better in each course is required. 

The minor in Physical Sciences requires ten credit hours of a laboratory sequence 
in chemistrv, phvsical science, or phvsics plus fifteen hours chosen from: AST 301, 
CHE 301, GEL 301, GEL 310, MET 301,'OCE 301. A grade of "C" or better is required in 
each course. 

The ASC Engineering Transfer Program 

The ASC Engineering Transfer Program offers course work contained in the first 
two years of the standard engineering curriculum at most accredited engineering 
schools. After following the suggested course sequence at Armstrong State, a student 
should be able to transfer to any ABET accredited engineering school and complete the 
requirements for a baccalaureate in a chosen field of engineering in a total of four to 
five years, which is the time typical of all engineering students. The program of courses 
has been constructed with advice from the Georgia Institute of Technology. Students 
are advised to contact the engineering school of choice on questions of transfer. 

Chemistry Offerings 

CHE 121/122 Introduction to Chemistry (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite or corequisite: MAT 101 . (Credit in these courses may not be applied to 
a major in chemistrv.) 

These courses include a study of the fundamental laws and theories of inorganic 
chemistry, a survey of organic chemistrv, and an introduction to biochemistry. 

CHE 128/129 General Chemistry (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: College Algebra or concurrently. Offered each quarter. 
These courses are the first two of the series 128,129,211 required to complete an 
academic year of general chemistry. A study of the fundamental principles and laws 
of chemistrv with a quantitative approach to the subject. These courses are designed 
for the science, pre-medical and engineering student. The laboratory work includes 
an understanding of fundamental techniques. 

CHE 201 Essentials of Chemistry (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 101 Eligibility. Offered each quarter. 

An introduction to inorganic, organic, and biochemistrv with emphasis on applica- 
tions in human physiology and clinical chemistry. Experimental principles will be 
illustrated with classroom demonstrations. 

CHE 202 Physical Principles (3-0-3) 
Prerequisite: CHE 201. 

This course provides a study of the physical principles of gas behavior, acid-base 
calculations, weak acid ionization, buffer solutions, pH measurements, blood gas 
measurements, and other subjects of special interest to persons in the allied health 
sciences. 

CHE 211 Chemical Principles (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CHE 129. Fall and Spring. 

This course is the third in the sequence 128, 129, 211 required to complete an 
academic year of general chemistry. Stresses chemical thermodynamics, kinetics, 
and equilibria. 



CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 109 



( III 101 I he ( he.n.sh\ el I If 

Prerequisite lenquai tei hours ol lab 

\n Introductory course covering >i applied bi< 

course is m>t recommended i>»i chemistry, bi< 

cm 107 Principles of Chemical Processes 

Prerequisites ( HI I29and MAT 2 

Methods oi material balance in i hemi< al| e studied topic subjects in< lude 

pnH esse*, and process \ ariables, B) stems oi units, g.is behavior, singh 
multi-phase systems ll\l Level of Felder and Rousseau J 

c ill MM Principles of ( iu-.nu.il Processes u (3-0-3) 
Prerequisite illl 

Methods ol energ) balance in < hemical pro< esses an? studied Various forn 
changes involved in both reactive and non-reactive pro ces s es are introduced 
I mphasis is placed on the application oi combined materia] and energ) balai 
processes 1 1 \ I I evel o( I elder and Rousseau / lemenlary Prim 
Processes 

CHE 341/342 Organic ( hemistij (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: c hemistr) 129. I all, \\ inter; \\ inter, Spring, 
rhese courses include the study of aliphatics, aromatic hydrocarbons and their 
derivatives, polyfunctional compounds, and polynuclear hydrocarbons Organic 
reactions are emphasized in terms oi modem theor) . 

CHE 343 Organic Chemistry (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 342. Fall, Spring. 

\ continuation oi the organic chemistry sequence 34 1342. I his course completes the 
Fundamental stud) of organic chemistry with a consideration oi carbohydrates, 
amino acids, and heterocyclics v» ith their related compounds. 

CHE 350 Chemical Literature (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 342. Offered on demand. 

An introduction to the use of the chemical library, the important journals, references 
and other information sources. Information will be collected, organized, and orally 
presented as a seminar. 

CHE 380 Quantitative Instrumental Analysis (3-6-5) 
Prerequisite: CI IE 129. Winter and Summer. 

A Study of the principles of volumetric, spectrophotometer, electrometric and 
chromatographic methods of anal) sis. 

CHE 397 Scientific Glass-Blowing (0-4-2) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor. Offered on demand. 

Properties ot glass for scientific apparatus; introduction of glass working equipment; 
planning of sequential joining operations; demonstration of major techniques for joining 
and working glass; supen ision of individual students in preparing test pit 

CHE 410 Chemical Safety (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: CHE 341 .Ottered on demand. 

Topic subjects will include standard laboratory safety practices, hazardous proper- 
ties of chemicals, safety practices in the Storage, use and disposal of 'chemicals, and 
gO\ eminent regulations. 

CHE 421 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3-6-5) 

Prerequisite: CUP 380, CHE 491. Offered on demand. 

Selected topics in inorganicchemistrv tending to increase students' understanding of 

mechanisms of chemical reactions. Emphasizes the periodicity of elements. Students 

will cany OUt extensive literature searches and participate in inorganic laboratory 

research. 

CHE 441 Advanced Organic Chemistry (2-3-3) 

Prerequisite: CHE 343. Spring. 

A further study of important organic reactions emphasizing theories of reaction 
mechanism of organic chemistry. 



110 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



CHE 448 Organic Qualitative Analysis (2-9-5) 
Prerequisite: CHE 343. Offered on demand. 
Systematic approach to the identification of organic compounds. 

CHE 451 History of Chemistry (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: Junior standing and CHE 129. 

The development of science surveyed from antiquity to the present. Emphasis is 
placed on the development of ideas, significant contributions, evolution of chemical 
theories, and the modern social implications of science. 

CHE 461 Biochemistry (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CHE 343. Offered on demand. 

A study of the chemical nature of cellular constituents and cellular metabolism. Subject 
topics include carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, enzymes, vitamins and coenzymes, 
anaerobic carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, 
oxidative phosphorylation, and photosynthesis. 

CHE 462 Biochemistry (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CHE 461 . Offered on demand. 

A study of the metabolism of ammonia and nitrogen-containing compounds, the 

biosynthesis of nucleic acids and proteins, metabolic regulation, and selected topics. 

CHE 466 Biochemistry Laboratory (0-6-2) 

Prerequisite or corequisite: CHE 461 . Offered on demand. 

A study of techniques used in biochemistry research. Topic subjects include separation, 

purification and characterization procedures. 

CHE 481 Advanced Instrumental Analysis (1-3-2) 

Prerequisite: CHE 380. 

A study of electrometric methods of analysis. Topic subjects will include potentiomet- 

ric, coulometric, and polarographic measurements. 

CHE 482 Advanced Instrumental Analysis (1-3-2) 

Prerequisites: CHE 380 and PHY 312. 

A study of spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods of analysis. Topic 
subjects will include visible and ultra-violet spectroscopy, gas-liquid chromatogra- 
phy, high performance liquid chromatography, atomic emission and absorption 
spectroscopy- 
CHE 483 Advanced Instrumental Analysis (1-3-2) 
Prerequisites: CHE 342 and 482. 

A continuation of the study of spectroscopy. Topic subjects will include infrared 
spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, electronspin resonance and mass 
spectrometry. 

CHE 491 Physical Chemistry I - Thermodynamics (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: CHE 211, 380, PHY 211 or 217, MAT 206. Fall. 

An introduction to physical chemistry, including study of the gas laws, heat and 
work, and the first, second and third laws of thermodynamics. These concepts will 
be applied to the study of material and reaction equilibrium as well as standard 
thermodynamic functions. Real gases and one-component phase equilibrium will 
also be studied. Students will carry out laboratory assignments designed to rein- 
force and supplement lecture material. 

CHE 492 Physical Chemistry II - Multicomponent Systems and Kinetics (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CHE 491. Winter. 

A continuation of CHE 491, this course begins with a study of ideal and non-ideal 
solutions, surface chemistry and electrochemical systems. Course concludes with 
the study of the kinetic-molecular theory of gases, transport processes and reaction 
kinetics. Students will carry out laboratory assignments designed to reinforce and 
supplement lecture material. 

CHE 493 Physical Chemistry III - Quantum Mechanics (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: CHE 211, 380, PHY 211 or 217, MAT 206. 

An investigation of the development of quantum mechanics and the corresponding 
evolution of modern theories of atomic and molecular structure. The application of 
these theories to spectroscopy and photochemistry are also studied. Emphasis is 



CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 111 



placed on the use of the scientifU method and the importance of ol 
development oi theor) Students will carr) out laboratory sssignn • 
reinforce and supplement lecture material 

c in 196 Internship <\ \ (1-12)) 

Offered by special arrangement Prerequisites:* in I I91andpermii 

the Chemistry Intern Program I Hret toi 

rhe student will pursue .< meaningful project in indu rnment <>r other 

iiis(ituiu>n.»i setting I he project will be determined, supervised, and evaluated by 
the sponsoi ol the activity and the student i faculty adviser Application .irui 
arrangement must be made through the department by mid quartet pre* eding the 
quarter of internship Open to transient students only with permission of tfv 
ol the Faculty .it Armstrong and the appropriate official ol the school hum which 
tin- student cornea 

Clll 4^7/ 

196/499 Independent Study (V-V-d -5)) 

Prerequisite ( onsen! ol tin* I lead ol the I department. ( Offered ea< h quarter 
Designed to permit qualified students to pursue supervised individual research oi 
stud) I mphasis will be placed on the literature.' search, laboratory experimenta- 
tion, and presentation ol an acceptable written report. Both the< redit and proposed 
work must be approved in writing by the faculty member who will supervise the 
work and by the department head. Open to transient students only with the 
permission ot the 1 Xwn of the Faculty at Armstrong and ol the college from which 
the student comes 

Engineering Offerings 

EGR 100 Introduction to Engineering (3-0-3). 

Prerequisite: Eligibility to enter MAT 101 and ENC; 101. 

\. omprehensive orientation to the engineering process from problem formulation to 
the evolution of creative design; fundamental concepts from various fields oi 
engineering. 

EGR 171 Engineering Graphics (2-3-3) 

Prerequisite: MAT 103, CS 1 16. 

Computer-aided graphics and engineering design fundamentals. Spatial analysis 
axioms, projection theory, sketching, creating design, geometric dimensioning, and 

tolerancing. 

EGR 220 Statics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: PHY 217 and MAT 207. 

Concepts of forces, moments, and other vector quantities; analysis of two-and-three- 
dimensional force systems; conditions of equilibrium; friction; centroidsand moments 
of inertia. 

EGR 221 Dynamics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: EGR 220 and MAT208. 

Kinematics of particles and rigid bodies; kinetics of particles and rigid bodies using 
force-mass-acceleration, work-energy , and momentum methods in tw o-and-three- 
dimensional motion. 

EGR 322 Mechanics of Deformable Bodies (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EGR 220. 

Internal effects and dimension changes of solids resulting from externally applied 
loads; shear and bending moment diagrams; analysis ot stress ^md strain; beam 
deflection; column stability. 

EGR 310 Electrical Circuit Analysis (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PHY 218. Prerequisite or Corequisite: MAT 341 . 

Basic laws of electrical circuits: RCL circuits, nodal and mesh analysis. Thevenin's 

and Norton's theorems; phasors, magnetically coupled circuits, and two-port 

parameters. 



112 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



EGR 311 Electronics I (5-3-6) 
Prerequisite: EGR 310. 

Introduction to P-N junction theory and the concepts of solid-state devices; develop- 
ment of the electrical characteristics of d iodes and transistors; bipolar and field-effect 
amplifying circuits; operational amplifiers and analog systems. 

EGR 312 Electronics II (2-6-4) 

Prerequisite: EGR 31 1 . 

Operation and application of integrated circuits used in digital systems; gates, flip- 
flops, counters, registers and memory devices. 

EGR 323 Fluid Mechanics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: EGR 221, EGR 330, and MAT 341 

Fluid Statics; analysis of fluid motion using the continuity, momentum, and energy 

conservation relationships; introduction to viscous flows. 

EGR 330 Thermodynamics I (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: PHY 217 and MAT 208. 

Basic concepts of thermodynamics; properties of substances; conservation principles; 

the first and second laws of thermodynamics; entropy; analysis of thermodynamic 

systems. 

EGR 331 Thermodynamics II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EGR 330. 

Gas cycles; vapor cycles; thermodynamic relationships; thermodynamic behavior 

of real gases; non-reacting gas mixtures; thermodynamics of chemical reactions. 

EGR 332 Heat Transfer (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EGR 323. 

The fundamental principle of heat transfer; steady and transient conduction in solids; 

introduction to convective heat transfer; thermal radiation. 

EGR 350 Computer Applications In Engineering (2-3-3) 

Prerequisites: CS 246, EGR 221, EGR 310, EGR 323. 

The application of digital computers to the solution of selected engineering prob- 
lems; emphasis on problem analysis and solution techniques. 

EGR 370 Engineering Economic Analysis (3-0-3) 

Prerequisites: MAT 206 and ECO 202. 

Fundamental principles and basic techniques of economic analysis of engineering 
projects including economic measure of effectiveness; time value of money, cost 
estimation, breakeven and replacement analysis. 

EGR 396 Engineering Internship (V-V-U-12)) 

Prerequisites: EGR 171, EGR 322, and permission of the Engineering Intern Program 

Director. 

The student will pursue a meaningful project in industry or government. The project 

will be determined, supervised, and evaluated by the sponsor of the activitv and 

the Engineering Intern Program Director. Application and arrangement must be made 

through the department bv mid-quarter preceding the quarter of internship. 

Physical Science Offerings 

PHS121 Physical Environment (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 101 Eligibilitv. Offered each quarter. 

An elemental} study of the fundamental laws and concepts of physics and astronomy. 
This course is designed for non-science majors interested in a descriptive survey . The 
laboratory study is designed to supplement the study of theory. 

PHS 122 Physical Environment (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 101 Eligibility. Offered each quarter. 

An elementary study of the fundamental laws and theories of chemistry, geology, 
meteorology and physical oceanography. This is a descriptive course which includes 
the classification of elements, basic chemical reactions, and atomic structure designed 
for the non-science major. The laboratory study includes experiences which augment 
class discussion. 



CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 113 



\si |01 Introduction to tatronom) (5m ,( 
quisite renquartei hoursol labor a I 

rud) i >t tin- p l.i lift. u \ system, stars, stellai structun 

(.11 KM Introduction to Physical ( icolon (3 D-3) 

equisite I en quartet hours "t .i laboi 
\n introdut Hon to pin si< 

processes of change, volcanolog) seismology plateti 
evolution ol the earth s i rust and inner regions 

(.1 i )10 Introduction to Historu.il Geolog) (5-0*5) 

equisite renquartei hours of a laboratory science 
An introduction to historical geolog) A study of the earth's origin and I 
through time 

\ll I 301 Introduction to Meteorology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite [en quarter hoursol laboratory science completed Spi 

An introduction to the description ol the state ol the atmosphere and toth< 

l.iw s th.it des< ribe atmospheric phenomena. 

(K I mm Introduction to Oceanography (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: I en quarter hours of a laboratory science completed ( Offered on demand 
\ stud) ol the bask principles oi oceanography topic subjects to include the 
distribution oi water o\ er the earth, nature and relief of tin.- ocean floors, tid< 
currents! chemical properties ol sea water and constituents, and applications >>t 
oceanographic research. 

Physics Offerings 

Pm 211 Mechanics (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: MAI 103. Fall, Winter. 

rhe first part of the sequence PH\ 21 1-212-21" in general physics. Bask classical 

ph\ sics, deluding mechanics, sound, and In-. it. Designed for students with aptitude 

in mathematics below the level of calculus. Selected experiments to demonstrate 

applications. 

PHY 212 Electricity, Magnetism, Basic Light (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: MAI 103 and V\\\ 211. Winter, Spring. 

rhe second part of the sequence PHY 21 1212-213. Basic electricity, magnetism, and 

geometrical optics. 

PHY 213 Light Phenomena, Modern Physics (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: MAI L03and PHY 212. Spring. 

The last part of the sequence PH\ 21 1-212-213. Continues the study of light from the 
viewpoint of physical optics, and concludes with the study of atomic and nuclear 
physics. Laboratory work includes two selected experiments of advanced scope. 

PHY 217 Mechanics (5-3-6) 

Prerequisite: MA I 206. I .ill And Spring. 

The first part of the sequence V\i\ 217-218-219 in general physics. Basic classical 

physics, including mechanics, sound and heat. Designed especially tor engineering 

students and recommended tor science majors. Selected experiments to demonstrate 

applications. 
PHY 218 Electricity, Magnetism, Basic Light (5-3-6) 

Prerequisites: MAI 207 or concurrently and PHY 217. Fall, Winter. 

The second part of the sequence PHY 217218-219. Bask electricity, magnetism, and 

geometrical optics. 

PHY 219 Light Phenomena, Modern Physics (5-3-6) 
Prerequisite: PI IV 218. Spring. 
The last part of the sequence PHY 217-218-219. Continues the study of light from the 

viewpoint oi physical optics, and concludes with the study of atomic and nuclear 
physics. Laboratory work includes two selected experiments of advanced scope. 

PHY 310 Electrical Circuit Analysis (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PHY 21 S. Prerequisite or Corequisite: MAT 341. 



114 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Basic laws of electrical circuits: RCL circuits, nodal and mesh analysis. Thevenin's and 
Norton's theorems; phasors, magnetically coupled circuits, and two-port parameters. 

PHY 312 Digital Electronics (3-6-5) 

Prerequisites: Math 103 and ten quarter hours of laboratory science completed. 
An introduction to discrete component and integrated circuits used in modern digital 
electronics. The primary objective of this course is to give students hands-on 
experience in constructing and investigating an array of digital circuits that are 
directly applicable in instrumentation. 

PHY 322 Mechanics of Deformable Bodies (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EGR 220. 

Internal effects and dimension changes of solids resulting from externally applied 
loads; shear and bending moment diagrams; analysis of stress and strain; beam 
deflection; column stability. 

PHY 323 Fluid Mechanics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: EGR 221 , EGR/ PHY 330, and MAT 341 . 

Fluid Statics; analysis of fluid motion using the continuity, momentum, and energy 

conservation relationships; introduction to viscous flows. 

PHY 330 Thermodynamics I (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: PHY 217 and MAT 208 

Basic concepts of thermodynamics: properties of substances; conservation principles; 

the first and second laws of thermodynamics; entropy; analysis of thermodynamic 

systems. 

PHY 380 Introductory Quantum Mechanics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: PHY 213 or PHY 219 and MAT 207. Offered on demand. 

An introduction to quantum mechanical principles with applications in atomic and 

molecular structure. 

PHY 412 Scientific Measurements with Digital Interfacing (2-6-5) 

Prerequisites: PHY 312 and CS 142. 

Principles and techniques used in measuring physical quantities. The major topics 
include transducers, data acquisition interface (A/D, D/A, DIO), GPIB, and data 
analysis. The computer is introduced as a general purpose laboratory instrument 
with data acquisition and process control capabilities. The students will gain 
hands-on experience through applications in experimental physics. 

PHY 417 Mechanics II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: PHY 217 or 211 and MAT 207. PHY 218 or 212 and MAT 341 are 
recommended. Offered on demand. 

Statics, kinematics, and dynamics of particles and of systems of particles are 
developed using Newtonian principles. 

PHY 490 Independent Study in Physics (V-V-(l-5)) 

Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor and permission of the department head and 
at least a junior standing. 

Permits qualified students to pursue research or study in physics under the 
supervision of a member of the physics faculty. Research activities will require the 
presentation of a written report. Studies of special topics will require the comple- 
tion of written exams. Both the credit and proposed work must be approved in 
writing by the faculty member who will supervise the work and by the department 
head. Open to transient students only with the permission of the Dean of Arts and 
Sciences at Armstrong and of the college from which the student comes. 

PHY 496 Physics Internship (V-V-(l-12)) 

Prerequisites: PHY 417 or EGR 220, PHY 330 or CHE 491, PHY 310, and permission 
of the Physics Intern Program Director. 

The student will pursue a meaningful project in industry or government. The 
project will be determined, supervised, and evaluated by the sponsor of the activity 
and the Physics Intern Program Director. Application and arrangements must be 
made through the department by mid-quarter preceding the quarter of internship. 
Open to transient students only with permission of the Dean of Arts and Sciences 
at Armstrong and of the college from which the student comes. 



GOVERNMENT 115 



Government 

I M u 1 1 \ 

\ i< .mt I V|\n tment i lead 

I w v >w ii ^ ieoi * Murph) . I tennis 

I tonahue Mi< hael ' Palmiotto, \\u hael 

Kearnes John ' Rhee, Ste^ e 

■ Megathtin, William 

* t iraduate I m ult) 

l he Department ol Government embraces tin' ideal ol liberal education and views 
education in related professional areas as an extension, rawer than the antithesis, oi 
libera] education. ( onsequently, all departmental programs and courses are i oiu eptu- 
all) -based, therein enabling students to de^ elop a theoreth al sophistication applii able 
to pra< deal realities. So corw eh ed, i ourses and programs achie\ e < urricular integrity 

1 he I tepartmenl firmly believes that e\ en currk ular integrity is nof enough, hov 
Instructional effecth eness is its inseparable complement, and attainment ol these twin 
goals serves as the primar) purpose of the Department oi Government. I he ongoing 
program ol faculty development ensures that the Btafi ol highly qualified educators 
each selected for service on the basis ol solid professional credentials — continually 
achieves that primary purpose 

In addition, the 1 department oi ( \o\ eminent highly values both research and sen i< e 
I o the extent of resources available, the 1 )epartment encourages research bv both faculty 
^nd students ^nd sen ice to the School, the College ^nd the community. 

It is within the foregoing context that the Department oi ( io\ eminent offers criminal 
justice and political science programs through the Brunswick Center, requires the( I.R.1 
or Political Science Major Field Achievement Test as an exit examination for its majors 
and offers the following on-campus undergraduate programs, concentrations and a hi rses 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE, ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE WITH A CONCENTRATION IN CORRECTIONS 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 53 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192 10 

2. ART 200, 271, 272 or 273; DRS 201; MUS 200; or PHI 201 5 

3. MAT 101 5 

4. Laboratory science sequence 10 

5. HIS 251 or 252, POS 113 10 

6. PSY 101, SOC 201 10 

7. PE 103 or 108, 166 3 

B. Area of Concentration 40 

CJ 100, 103, 210, 280, 290, 301, 303, 360, and one CJ elective 

C. Regents' Examination 

TOTAL 93 



116 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE, ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE WITH A CONCENTRATION IN LAW ENFORCEMENT 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 53 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192 10 

2. ART 200, 271, 272 or 273; DRS 201; MUS 200; or PHI 201 5 

3. MAT 101 5 

4. Laboratory science sequence 10 

5. HIS 251 or 252; POS 113 10 

6. PSY 101; SOC 201 10 

7. PE 103 or 108, 166 3 

B. Areas of Concentration 40 

CJ 100, 103, 210, 280, 290, 301, 305, and two CJ electives 

C. Regents' Examination 

TOTAL 93 
At least 45 hours of each of these two programs must be completed at Armstrong. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE, ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE IN 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE WITH A CONCENTRATION IN LAW ENFORCEMENT 
(With P.O.S.T. Certification) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 53 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192 10 

2. ART 200, 271, 272 or 273; DRS 201; MUS 200; or PHI 201 5 

3. MAT 101 5 

4. Laboratory science sequence 10 

5. HIS 251 or 252; POS 113 10 

6. PSY 101; SOC 201 10 

7. PE 103 or 108, 166 or 167 3 

B. Areas of Concentration 40 

CJ 100, 103, 104, 204, 210, 280, 290, 301, 305 

C. P.O.S.T. Certification 

CJ 426, 460, PSY 208, PE 167 18 

D. Regents' Examination 

TOTAL 1 1 1 

NOTE: Students desiring P.O.S.T. Certification must see the Criminal Justice Training 
Center Director for advisement on P.O.S.T. requirements. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CRIMINAL 
JUSTICE 

Students who intend to major in Criminal Justice should complete Criminal Justice 100 
before the end of the freshman year and should complete all general education require- 
ments as soon as possible. 

Hours 
A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 201; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103, 195, 220, or 290 10 

2. Laboratory science sequence 10 



GOVERNMENT 117 



\ti-a Ill 

l ins in |i5oi 192 POS ii I 
PSi 101 E( O201 

i l\ 
l C | um. 103 21 

v >iH' course sele< ted from 

\\l 201 E( O201 202 Dl 'I. PS\ 101 

I HIS 251 oi 2 >2 
V 

1 PI I03oi 108, L66 

2 l hree a< th it) courses 

B Wa of Concentration 

I Q »1, v I >,and490or495 

C 1 lectives from Related Areas 

l Sixty-five hours chosen with iuh ism- approval. 

1 Kcepl for students pursuing a minor in another department, 
no more than fifteen hours may be taken from any one 

department except C.o\ eminent. Se> en ot these COUTSCS 

must he .^00-400 level courses 

D Regents' and 1 \it 1 xaminations o 



TOTAL 191 

Majors In Political Science 

I he major in Political Science may take three distinct forms; Political Science, 
Political Science with Teacher Certification, or Political Science with a concentra- 
tion in Public Administration. 

To complete a Political Science major requires forty quarter hours of upper division 
courses in the field with grades of "C" or better in each course. Further, the program 
must include at least one course from each of the following: American Political 
Institutions, International Relations, Political Theory, and Comparative Govern- 
ment The major allows the option of a foreign language (French or German preferred ) 
through the 103 level or a sequence of computer science courses. Students who 
contemplate graduate work in Political Science are strongly advised to take the foreign 
language option and to continue their linguistic study beyond the 103 level. 

Programs in Public Administration and Political Science with Teacher Certification 
are more structured in order to prepare students adequately to meet the demands o\ their 
professions and appropriate licensing agencies. 

Scholarships In Political Science 

Limited scholarship aid is available annually. Interested students are Invited to 
inquire in the Department oi Government office for details. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 
WITH A MAJOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 1 5 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271 . 272. 273; DRS 201; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 
Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 220 10 

2. One of the sequences: BIO 101, 102; BIO 111, 112; 

CHE 121, 122, PHS 121, 122 10 



118 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



1 



Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201, ECO 201, PSY 101, SOC 201 5 

Area IV 20 

1. HIS 251 or 252 5 

2. One of the sequences: 

A. Foreign language 101, 102, 103 or 

B. CS 115, 142, and 247 15 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 40 

At least one course from each of the following areas: 

1. American Political Institutions — 

POS 303, 305, 317, 318, 360, 401, 403, 411, 412, 415, 418, 419, CJ 390 ..5-25 

2. International Affairs — 

POS 320, 321, 325, 326, 329, 426, 429 5-25 

3. Political Theory — 

POS 333, 334 ..1 5-10 

4. Comparative Government — 

POS 344, 345, 346, 348, 349, 445, 447 5-25 

5. Capstone Course — 

POS 495 5 

C. Courses in Related Fields 35 

To be chosen in fields such as Computer Science, Economics, 
Geography, Mathematics. See Department for exhaustive list 

D. Electives 30 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 

WITH A MAJOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE (with teacher certification) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 201; MUS 200; PHI 201 ... 5 
Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 220 10 

2. Laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. PSY 101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. Foreign language 101, 102, 103 or CS 115, 142, 247 15 

2. HIS 251 or 252 5 

3. One course from: ANT 201, ECO 201, SOC 201 5 

4. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 5 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 



GOVERNMENT 111 



mum's in t hi- Majoi I ield 
\t least one course from each o( the followiri 
i Vmeru an Politk al Institutions 

POS H8 ; <>o 101 103 H1 

Internationa] Relations 

POS 

1 Political I heory — 

POS • 

i (. omparative ( lovernmenl 

POS 

i Capstone Course POS 195 

Supporting Work 20 

Pen hours ea< h from tw o ol the follow Ing an 
\ HIS 251 or 252 and approved JOOh elective 
B ECO 201 and approved WOh elective 
( approved ele< u\ es in beha\ ioraJ sciences (AN I. PSY, SA 
D.Q 0211,212 
C Professional Sequence 40 

1. HON 200; EXC 310, 1 DN 535, 449, 471, 472, 473 

2. PS^ 201 or I DN 201 5 

D. Regents' and Exil Examinations o 

rOTAl 196 

PROGRAM FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A MAJOR IN 
POLITICAL SCIENCE (PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION) 

Hours 

\ Genera] Requirements 9h 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 1D2 or 192,201 or 292 L5 

2 One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 201; MUS 200; PHI 201 ...5 
Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 103 10 

2. One ot the sequences: BIO 101, 102; CHE 121, 122; PHS 121, 122 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, L15or 192 10 

2. POS 113; ECO 201 10 

Area IV 30 

1. CS 142, 231, 242 15 

2. HIS 251 or 2^2; ECO 202; SOC 201 L5 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Courses m the Major Field 4^ 

1. One course from each of the following 20 

A. American Political Institutions — 

POS 305, 317, 318, 360, 411, 412, 413, 419 5 

B. International Affairs — 

POS 320, 321, 323, 326, 329, 424, 426, 429 5 

C. Political Theory — 

POS 333, 334... 3 

D. Comparative Government — 

POS 344, 343, 346, 348, 349, 443, 447 3 

2. Public Administration 

PA/POS 303, 401, 403, 418; CJ 390 25 



120 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



C. Courses in Related Fields 15 

1. CS 301, 308 10 

2. SOC 350 or MAT 220 5 

D. Electives 35 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 



TOTAL 191 

Minor Concentrations 

The Department of Government offers a number of minor concentrations. 

A minor in Criminal Justice or in Political Science has great practical value. Its 
notation on the transcript indicates to an employer that the applicant has some solid 
liberal arts background with its accompanying insight into the development and func- 
tioning of modern society, and that the applicant has made an extra effort to refine 
research and writing skills so essential to dealing with that society. Whatever the 
major one chooses, such a minor will strengthen the student's academic record. 

Minor concentrations are available in International Studies, Russian Studies, 
Public Administration, Criminal Justice, Political Science, and Legal Studies. 

Minors, in addition to grades of "C" or better in each course, require: 

Hours 
Legal Studies 25 

1. CJ/POS 360, CJ 460, and POS 317 or 318 15 

2. Two courses from: CJ 380, CJ 391, CJ/POS 447, POS 326, 

POS 415, POS 418 10 

International Studies 25 

(assumes competency in one modern foreign language through the 
103 level). 

1. POS 329 and 325 or 326 10 

2. One course from: POS 320, 321, 345, 346, 348, 349 5 

3. Two courses from: POS 426, 429; HIS 323, 330, 455, 564, 569, 591 10 

Political Science 20 

Twenty hours of 300+ level POS courses, with at least one 

course from each of the four concentration areas of POS 20 

Russian Studies 20 

1. RUS 201 (assumes completion of RUS 101-103) 5 

2. POS 349 5 

3. Two courses from: HIS 329, 330, 481, 567, 568, 569; POS 440 10 

(a multi-departmental minor) 

Public Administration 25 

CJ 390; PA 303, 401, 403, 418 25 

Criminal Justice 25 

CJ 301, 303, 305, 360, and anv one course from 

CJ 390, 410, 425, 426, or 447 25 

Criminal Justice Offerings 

CJ 100 Administration of Justice (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101. 

This survey course examines the emergence and current state of formal institutions 
established within the American experience to deal with criminal behavior. 
Philosophical, cultural, social and political aspects of the justice system and 
processes will be examined. Emphasis will be given to the current political and 
bureaucratic realities of the system's administration and to related public policy- 
issues stemming from the profound transformation of American society as the next 
century approaches. 



GOVERNMENT 



i I 10; Developing Interpersonal i ommunication Skill 

Ine emphasis ol this course will be placed upon it . 
communication skills i «• skills that can I 

mti-i.iv Hon among employees and fcx ind thepul 

c I in j lntrodu< Hon to I ■* i nforcemenl (5-0 >) 

Prerequisite v I 100 or permission of the instructoi 
rhis course provides an introduction to the history, philo 
of the police system m the I nited s t 
applications of the lavs which a lavs enforcement of ficei mustki 
I. un enforcement at ti\ mes 

t I 204 ( riminaJ Investigation (5-0 >) 

Prerequisite \ ligibilit) for I N< ! 101 

Introduction to im estigative methodology Spe< ial te< hniques employed in< nmm.il 
i in estigation sm has< rime scene sean hes, the use ol informants, and th.- tt-«. hniques 
of sun eillancew ill be emphasized as well as the presentation o( police< ases in court 

c | 210 ( riminolog) (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite Eligibility foi I V . 101. 

rhe nature and extent ol ( rime in the United States; assessment and e\ aluat 
various factors and influences that lead to criminal behavior; various measures 
proposed tor the control ot criminal behav ioi 

c | 250 Directed Readings In Criminal [ustice (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ 100. 

\ course designed to permit each student to pursue an approved topic through 
independent stud) and research under the guidance and direction of the instructor 

C| 280 Ethics In Criminal [ustice Practice and Research (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: CJ 100 or POS 1 13 or consent of the instructor. 

Analysis oi ethical concepts, principles, and prescriptive moral judgments in the 

practice and research of criminal justice 
q 290 Criminal Procedure (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: CJ 360 or consent ol instructor. 

\ survey ol the distinctive features of, and the basis tor. American criminal law 

buttressed b\ an analysis oi leading court decisions relative to procedural rights 

emanating from the Bill ol Rights. 

CJ 301 Juvenile Delinquency (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ 100 or consent of instructor. 

\ survey of theories ol juvenile delinquency; the sociological, biological, ^nd 
psychological factors involved in juvenile delinquency and the modern trends in 
prevention mu\ treatment. 

CJ 302 Criminalistics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: A natural science laboratory sequence or consent of instructor. 
An introduction to the problems and techniques of scientific criminal im estimation. 
Emphasis will be placed on familiarizing the student with the role of science and 
technology in modem law enforcement. 

Penology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CI 100, or consent of instructor. 

I his course deals with the analysis and evaluation of both historical m^\ contem- 
porary correctional systems. This course will also deal with the development. 
organization, operation t -\nd results of the different systems of corrections found in 
America. 

CJ 304 Probation and Parole (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ 303 or consent of instructor. 

This course will deal with the development, organization, operation and results of 
ems of probation and parole as substitutes tor incarceration. 



122 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



CJ 305 Law Enforcement Systems (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ 1 00 or consent of instructor. 

An introduction to the philosophical, cultural and historical background of the 
police idea. The course is conceptually oriented and will deal with concepts such as 
the role of the police in contemporary society, the quasi-military organization of the 
police, and community relations. 

CJ 307 Community Based Treatment (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ 303 or consent of instructor. 

This course will investigate the different community based treatment programs. An 
emphasis will be placed on investigating the function of halfway houses and the use 
of volunteers in corrections. 

CJ 360 Law and Legal Process (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ 100 or POS 1 13 or consent of the instructor. 

Examination of law as a dynamic societal institution. Sources and functions of both 
civil and criminal law, as well as operation of the legal process, are studied from 
the perspectives of jurisprudence, political science, and sociologv. (Identical with 
POS 360.) 

CJ 380 Law of Evidence (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ 360 or consent of instructor. 

An intensive analysis of the rules of evidence in criminal cases. Particular subjects 

will include burden of proof, hearsay evidence, and the principles of exclusion and 

selection. 

CJ 390 Research Methods (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: ENG 101 and 102 and permission of instructor. 

This course deals with the methods and techniques of research in the behavioral 

sciences. Emphasis will be placed on learning how to evaluate research. 

CJ 391 Legal Research/Law Mini-Thesis (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: CJ 360, ENG 102. 

Open to students of any major, this course comprises the major areas of legal research 
and writing; finding and using appropriate legal research tools and resources and 
applying these to develop and complete a scholarly legal research paper. 

CJ 399 Special Topics in Criminal Justice (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Coverage of substantive topics, problems and issues, not covered in other courses, 
which are of contemporary importance to students in criminal justice. Topics to be 
announced before each offering of the course. 

CJ 410 Criminality and Abnormal Behavior (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101 and either CJ 100 or permission of instructor. 
The course examines the interface between abnormal behavior, including mental 
illness, and criminality by presenting recent developments in the identification, 
classification, and treatment of criminals. Special emphasis is given to understanding 
the sometimes bizarre behavioral patterns and motivations of repeat offenders, such 
as child molesters, sex criminals, perpetrators of domestic violence, addicts, serial 
murderers and rapists. 

CJ 425 Drug Enforcement: Issues and Problems (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ 100. Open to seniors only or by consent of instructor. 
A survey of historical and contemporary drug law enforcement in American society. 
Such topics as drug distribution, gangs, and government drug-enforcement agencies, 
policies, and techniques will be examined. 

CJ 426 International Terrorism (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: POS 1 13 or CJ 100, or consent of instructor. 

Investigation of the political, legal, and sociological aspects of international 
terrorism. Topics to be examined include the relationships of international terrorism, 
international relations, and principles of international law, the nature of the anti- 
terrorist response, and the implications of international terrorism for the future. 
(Identical with POS 426.) 



GOVERNMENT 123 



c | 147 I Mnparativc fudicial Systems I W>-5) 

Prerequisite CJ ; >' i 01 CJ/PO toi 

Designed to focus on the la* tnforcemen( md |udicisJ pr<»« ediu oi the 

lapanese French German and the former Soviet political s) 1 ilwith 

c| 190 1 leld 1 Kpcriencc I (5-0-5) 

Offered each quartet Prerequisite: Open to junior and senior criminal justice majors 
on)) and b) irw Itation o( tin- InstriM toi 

1 he purpose oi this< ourse is to broaden the edu c ational e x pe ri ence of stud en tstl 
appropriate observation and work assignments with criminal justice agencii 
course will be organized around specifk problem orientations with operational 
irch connotations. Students will be expected to spend a minimum of five hours pei 
week in the parti< ipating agent \ i >pen to transient students onl) with permission 
ol the m hool dean .» t Armstrong and ol tin- 1 ollege from whi< h the student i omes 

C| 4Si I leld I Kperience 1 1 (5-0-5) 

O ffe red ea< h quarter Prerequisite: ( >pen to junior and senior criminal justice majors 
onl) and by invitation oi the instructor 

rhisisa sequential course toC 1 450 which will permit the student to broaden further 
hisperspecth es. ( >pen to transient students only with permission oi these hooldean 
at A r m s trong and ol the college from whn h the student comes 

CJ 452/ 

453/454 Internship (V-V-5) 

Offerred each quarter. Prerequisite: [unior or senior standing and permission ol the 
instructor. 

I his course is designed to provide the student withanopportunit) to apply academic 
training in the practical governmental setting. Setting will include law enforcement 
agencies (local, state, or federal), community treatment facilities, courts, congres- 
sional offices, and various governmental agencies, ["his course will be jointly 
supervised bj departmental instructors and agency officials Open to transient 
students only with permission o( the school dean at Armstrong and of me college from 
which the student comes. (Identical with PA/POS 452-453-454.) 

Criminal Law (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ/POS 360 or permission of instructor. 

Examination oi criminal deviant behavior from society's perspective in both the 

defining of crimes c\nd the prosecution convi< tion/punishment of those engaging 

in such behavior. Georgia criminal law will be highlighted. 

Directed Research In Criminal Justice (5-0-5) 
Prerequisite: CJ J90. Open to seniors only. 

One of two capstone courses, either ol which satisfies the capstone requirement, 
this course provides qualified students the opportunity to undertake and complete 
a major research project in criminal justice. Students will conduct research and 
present their results orally and in a paper conforming to departmental guidelines 
for written work. 

Seminar in Criminal Justice (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ 390. Open to seniors only. 

One of two capstone courses, either of which satisfies the capstone requirement. 

this course is an intensive Study oi selected criminal justice topics. Students will 

conduct research and present their results orally and in a paper conforming to 

departmental guidelines for written work. 

Political Science and Public Administration Offerings 

POS 113 American Government (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101. 

A study of the structure, theory, and functions of the national government in the 

United States, and some of the major problems of the state and local government. 



124 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PA/POS 303 Foundations of Public Administration (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 1 13 or permission of instructor. 

An introduction to the framework of public administration including such concepts 
and issues as bureaucracy, administrative power, informal groups, third party 
government, issue networks, budgeting, implementation, incremental decision 
making, personnel motivation, and the relationship of ethics and public service. 

POS 305 State and Local Government (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 1 13 or permission of instructor. 

A comparative study of states, communities, and local governments, and their 
management of political conflict. Included is a study of federalism, differences in 
governmental structures and functions, political culture, community power, tax and 
budget systems, and public policy issues facing states and communities. 

POS 317 Constitutional Law and the Federal System (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113 or permission of instructor. 

A case-study approach to the judicial interpretation of the Constitution, and the 
powers of the federal government. Including: the nature and scope of judicial review, 
commerce power, separation of powers, power to tax and spend, state power to 
regulate, and economic due process. 

POS 318 Constitutional Civil Liberties (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113 or permission of instructor. 

A case study approach to the judicial interpretation of individual rights and the 
Constitution. Including: nationalization of the Bill or Rights, criminal due process, 
freedom of expression, association, religion and privacy, and equal protection and 
due process. 

POS 320 International Trade (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 202 or permission of instructor. 

Examines the economic importance and problems of international trade, exchange 
rates and monetary standards, tariffs and other trade barriers. Attention will be 
focused on fixed and floating exchange rates and their effects on trade balances of 
states. Current debt problems of developing nations will be examined. (Identical with 
ECO 320.) 

POS 321 International Relations: East Asia (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113 or consent of instructor. 

Contemporary international politics in East Asia are examined in terms of such 
broad historical trends as the decline of imperialism, development of nationalism, 
and superpower interaction in East Asia during the Cold War and post-Cold War 
eras. Further attention will be placed on the significance of the political economy of 
the Asian Pacific Rim states toward the 21st Century. 

POS 325 International Organization. (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 1 1 3 or permission of instructor. 

A survey of the development, principles, structures and functions of international 
organizations, with emphasis upon the role of these institutions in the maintenance 
of peace. 

POS 326 International Law (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113 or permission of instructor. 

An introduction to selected public international law topics including: recognition, 
state succession, jurisdiction, extradition, nationality, the law of treaties, the law 
of diplomacy, and the law of war. 

POS 329 International Relations (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 1 13 or permission of instructor. 

An introduction to the theories, forces, and practices dominating contemporary 

international relations. 

POS 333 Contemporary Political Thought (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113 or permission of instructor. 

Analysis of the important ideological currents of our time with selected in-depth 

readings from original sources. 



GOVERNMENT 



POS 134 Political Philosophy 

Prerequisite IX >s 1 1 loi permission ol inslrui toi 
1 xamination ol the political ideas ol l« 

ind extending to the end ol the 19th ( entui 
matei ial w ill be read and anal) .< 

POS M4 Politico ol the Indian Subcontinent I hO-5) 

rhe course will assess the political, economic so< ial and ^ ultural ( 
to the functioning ol governmental regimes within the Indian Subcontii i 
micro based analysis ol Indian social and political structures \\ ill .«i 
taken rhe move toward greatei regional cooperation through the South 
\ss»h iation tor Regional <- ooperation i s \ \Kc > w ill also I 1 "' r\ al • 

POS 148 1 itta American Politics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite P( )s 1 1 Jor permission ol instru< tor 

I xamination ol goi ernmenta and politic al pro* esses ol seta ted nations in South 
America c !entral Amerfc a. and the( aribbean Roles of state terrorism, r»-\ olution- 
ar\ nn>\ ements, and nan o-terrorism are examined 

POS 346 Governments ol East tsia (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite I 'OS 1 1 5 or permission ol instruc tor. 

K comparand e examination ol the contemporary political institutions, pn 

ideas ol the People's RepublicofC hina, Kip.in.aiul Korea i xamines the development 

ol these political s) stems with particular emphasis on historical, so< ial, cultural, 

and contemporar) -issue dimensions. 

POS 3 I s Governments of Western Europe (5-0-5) 
Prerequisite: POSH 3 or permission of instructor. 

An analytical mu\ comparative study of the major Western 1 uropean governments, 
with principal emphasis upon the analysis of the conditions which led to effectn e 
and stable parliamentary government and those which lead to the inefficiency, 
instability and breakdown of such systems. 

POS 349 The Political Transformation: the Former Soviet Union (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: P05 1 13 or consent of instructor. 

An analysis and contemporary study of the political change in the former Soviet 
I nion; primarily examines the new direction of the political, economic and social 
transformation of the former Soviet Union. Even though some emphasis will be 
placed on the comparison of the Isarist autocracy and the Soviet totalitarian 
s\ stem, thecoursewill primarily examine the political transformation of the former 
et Union in the post-Cold War setting. 

POS 360 Law and Legal Process (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CJ 100 or POS 113 or permission of instructor. 

Examination of law as a d\ namic societal institution. Sources and functions of bom 

civil and criminal law, as well as operation of the legal process, are studied from the 
perspectives of jurisprudence, political science, and sociology. (Identical with CJ 
360). 
PA/POS 401 Politics of the Budgetary Process (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 1 1 3 or permission of instructor. 

I his course examines the procedures, strategies ^nd rationales involved in making 
public budgets at the local, state, and national levels. It is also concerned with 
critiques of the several types of budgets now in use together with an explanation of 
fiscal and monetary policies as they affect budgeting. Finally, it is concerned with 
the revenue systems in effect together with auditing and other controls exercised in 
the budgeting proo 

PA/POS 403 Public Policy Development (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 303 or permission of the instructor. 

This course is primarily concerned with a study of the theoretical aspects of 
decision-making theories (i.e., rational comprehensive model \ s. incremental 
model), political aspects of policy-making process, mobilization of political sup- 
port, and the cost/ benefit aspects of the public policy-making. 
Some attempt will be made to apply the general theory of public policy-making to 
specific settings oi welfare policy, urban problems, and national defense foreign 
Dolicv. 



126 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



POS 410 Independent Study In American Government (V-V-(l-5)) 

Prerequisite: A minimum of 120 credit hours, including at least 20 hours in Political 
Science at the 300-level or above. Admission is by approval of a departmental 
committee. 

Designed to permit superior students to pursue individual research and reading in some 
field of political science under the supervision of a member of the staff. Emphasis 
will be on wide reading, conferences with the advisor and written reports and essays. 
Normally open only to students with a B average (3.0) in Political Science and at 
least a 2.5 GPA overall. Applications must be filed with the Department by mid- 
quarter preceding the quarter independent study is contemplated. 
Open to transient students only with permission of the school dean at Armstrong and 
the college from which the student comes. 

POS 411 American Presidency (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 1 13 or permission of instructor. 

Offers an in-depth look at the office of the presidency, with the principal emphasis 
on the relations of the executive branch with the Congress and the court system . Some 
attention will be given to the evolution of the presidency to its present dominant 
position in the American political process. (Completion of a survey course in American 
History is desirable). 

POS 412 American Political Parties (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 1 13 or permission of instructor. 

Operation of political parties in the political system. Relationship between party 

organization, electoral system, and the recruitment and advancement of political 

leaders. 

POS 415 American Supreme Court (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 1 1 3 or permission of instructor. 

An analysis of the structure and functions of the Court, including examination of the 

role of the Court as policy maker. 

PA/POS 418 Administrative Law (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 1 13 or permission of instructor. 

This course explores the framework of law governing administrative agencies 

including: administrative power and its control by the courts, the determination and 

enforcement of administrative programs, discretion of administrative officials and 

their powers of summary actions, hearings before administrative boards, and the 

respective spheres of administrative and judicial responsibility. 

Some attention will be given to the problem of the maintenance of traditional 

procedural safeguards in administrative law and the problem of civil rights and 

relation to administrative boards. Leading cases will be examined. 

POS 419 American Congress (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 1 13 or permission of instructor. 

An analysis of the structure and functions of Congress, including a discussion of the 
theoretical framework for representative government, and Congress' role as policy- 
maker. 

POS 420 Independent Study In International Relations (V-V-(l-5)) 

Prerequisite: A minimum of 120 credit hours, including at least 20 hours in Political 

Science at the 300-level or above. Admission is by approval of a departmental 

committee. 

Designed to permit superior students to pursue individual research and reading in some 

field of international relations under the supervision of a member of the staff. 

Emphasis will be on wide reading, conferences with the advisor and written reports 

and essays. Normally open only to students with a B average (3.0) in Political Science 

and at least a 2.5 GPA overall. Applications must be filed with the Department by 

mid-quarter preceding the quarter independent study is contemplated. 

Open to transient students only with permission of the school dean at Armstrong and 

the college from which the student comes. 



GOVERNMFNT 



127 



PA/POS 

452/453/454 



International I er mi ism I | \) 

Prerequisite* POS 113 or < 1 100, or consent of instrii 

ln\ estimation of the political, i< f international tei 

ism ropics to be examined im lude Ihe relationship* <>t international U 
international relation! and prin< ipi» -^ «>t international law t > i • - nature ••' '!<■• anti 
terrorist re s ponse and the implications of int< iture 

(Identical with CJ 42 

\mumu .in I oreign Poli< \ (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite ro s 1 1 I or permission of instruct 

A*n analysis of t s foreign policy and factors, both domestic and fo r e ign contributing 

to its formulation 

Independent Stud) in Political ITieor) (V-V-tt-5)) 

> in in it,' K minimum ol 120 credit hours, nu hiding at least 20 hours in Political 
Science .it tin- MXMevel or abanre Admission is b) approval >>t .i departmental 
committee 

•u\l topenriitsupenorstudentstopuisueindividua] resean hand reading in some 
field of political theor) under the supen ision ol ,i member ol t ht- st.ur I mphasis 
will boon w ide readings onferenceswith tln-.uK isorand written reports and essays 
Normally open onlj to students with i b a\ erage 1 3.0) in Politic al S< ieru e and at 
least a 2J5 GPA o\ erall. Applications must be filed with the I department b) mid- 
quarter preceding the quarter independent study is contemplated. 
Open to transient students only with permission ol the school dean al Armstrong and 
me college from which the student comes 

Independent Study In Comparative Government (V-V-O-5)) 
Prerequisite: A minimum ot 120 credit hours, including al least 20 hours m Political 
Science .it the 300-level or above. .Admission is by approval ot a department.il 
committee. 

Designed topennitsuperior students to pursue individual research arid reading in some 
field of comparative government under the supervision ol a member of the staff. 
Emphasis will be on wide reading/ con f erences with the advisor and written reports 
andessa) s. Normall) open only to students with a Baverage(3.0) in Political Science 
,md at least a 2.5 t !PA o\ erall Applications must be filed w ith the 1 tepartment bv 
mid-quarter preceding the quarter independent Study is contemplated. 
Open to transient Students only with permission ot the school dean at Arm strong and 
the college from which the student comes. 

Comparative Economic Svstems (5-0-5) 
Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

The course will constitute a survey of the basic tenets of the major economic S) stems 
developed in the l^th ^nd 20th centuries. I he role of government and politics will 
be examined, along with the contributions to economic and political thought of such 

men as Adam Smith, karl Marx, |ohn Mavnard Keynes, and Milton Friedman. 
(Identical with ECO 445.) 

Comparative judicial Systems (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Q 305 or Q POS 360, OT POS 4 1 5, or consent of instructor. 

gnedtofocuson me lawe nfor cement and judicial procedure aspects of the Japanese, 
French. German, >nd the former Soviet political systems. (Identical with CJ 4 • 

Internship (V-V-5) 

Ottered each quarter under each heading. Prerequisite: lunior or senior Standing and 

permission of instructor. 

This course is designed to provide the student with an opp o rtunity to apply academic 

training in the practical governmental Setting. Settings will include law enforcement 
agencies (local, state, or federal), community treatment facilities, courts, congres- 
sional offices, and various governmental agencies. This course will be jointly 
supervised by departmental instructors and agency officials. Open to transient 
students only with permission of the school dean at Armstrong and of the college from 
which the student comes. (Identical with CI 4^2-4^-454.) 



128 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



POS 495 Seminar in Political Science (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Open to seniors only. 

[Tub capstone course is an intensive study of selected political science topics. 
Students will conduct research and present their results orally and in a paper 
conforming to departmental guidelines tor written work. 



History 

Faculty 

* Gross, Jimmie F., Acting Department Head 

* Arens, Olavi, Associate Graduate Program Director 

* Burnett, Robert Lanier, Osmos 

* Comaskey, Bernard Patterson, Robert 

* Duncan, John * Pruden, George 
Fertig, Barbara * Stone, Janet 
Finlav, Mark * Warlick, Roger 
Hendricks, Christopher F. Waters, Thomas 
Howard, Thomas F. * Yentsch, Anne 

* Graduate Faculty 

The History Major 

The major in history may take either of two forms: History per se or History with 
T-4 Certification. 

Students who major in history are required to complete a fifteen quarter hour foreign 
language sequence, or proficiency in a foreign language offered by the College through 
the 103 level. Students should begin their language sequence during their Sophomore 
year, certainly not later than their Junior year. Therefore, students should plan their 
programs of study with careful consultation with a Faculty Adyisor. Students who 
change majors, or who transfer, may find it necessary to enroll beyond the traditional 12 
quarters, if the degree requirements including the foreign language cannot be fulfilled 
within that time. 

Students enrolled in the eyening program should not expect to be exempted from the 
foreign language requirement, unless for a three year period prior to graduation no 
ayailable foreign language sequence is offered in the eyening. 

In addition to meeting minimum requirements for either program, students 
contemplating graduate work in history are strongly adyised to continue their 
linguistic study beyond the language sequence 103 level. Students with a double major, 
where Computer Science is a language choice, may substitute Computer Science for the 
foreign language requirement in history. 

Advanced coursework in History for either form of the major requires HIS 450 and HIS 
496 or 497. In selecting the remainder of their advanced courses students may choose to 
concentrate in one particular area of History (e.g. European or American), providing they 
diversity to the extent of completing at least ten hours outside that area. 

The B. A. History major is offered both day and evening hours on the ASC campus, and 
in the evening at the Brunswick Center — except for HIS 450 and 496 or 497. These two 
requirements must be completed on campus. The B.G.S. with a History concentration is 
fullv available at both locations. 









HISTORY 



Honors In History 

See HIS 499 Senioi rhesis in Histor) for detailed information 

Scholarships In History 

1 United scholarship aid is available annually Interested students are invite I 
Inquire in the department office foi details 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 
WITH A MAJOR IN HISTORY 

I lours 

\ *. lateral Requirements 11 

trea I 

1. ENG 101 . id: or 192,201 or292 15 

: Onecoursefrom \Kl 200,271,272,273; MUS200; PHI 201 5 

Vrea II 20 

1 MAI 101 and 103, 195, 220 or 290 L0 

2 One of the sequences: BIO 101, 102; CHI 121. 122; V\\\ 121,122; 

PI IS 121. 122 10 

\iea in 20 

1. HIS 114. L15or 192, POS 113 13 

2. One course from: AN I 201; ECO 201; SOC 201; PSY 101 5 

trea IV 

1. Foreign language 101. 102, 103 15 

2. Histor) 251,252 10 

3. Related course 3 

\iea Y 6 

1. PI I03or I08and 117 or 166 3 

2. I hree aeti\ it\ courses 

B. Courses m the Major Field 40 

1. HIS 450 and 4% or 497 10 

2. History courses 300 level or above with at least 10 hours 

outside the area of concentration 30 

The concentration areas are: 

A. U.S. History— HIS 351, 352, 354, 355, 357, 361, 363, 371, 374, 375 
J77 $79, 400, 421, 423, 431, 433. 456, 459, 462, 463, 465, 485, 486, 496 

B. European History— HIS 333, 336, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347. 
348, 330, 410, 411, 443, 447, 464, 483, 484, 4^<7 

C. Russian-Asian-African-l atin American History — HIS 310, 311, 312, 
320, 321, 322, 323, 329, 330, 42S, 431, 433, 481,482 

C. Courses in Related Fields 20 

To be chosen from such fields as anthropology, economics, geography, 
literature, political science, public history, sociology, statistics at least 
10 hours o\ which must be at 300-le\'el or above. See Department tor 
exhaustive list 20 

D. Electives 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 



130 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 
WITH A MAJOR IN HISTORY (with teacher certification) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 220 10 

2. Laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192, POS 113 15 

2. PSY101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. HIS 251 or 252 5 

2. Foreign language 101, 102, 103 15 

3. One course from: ANT 201, ECO 201, SOC 201 5 

4. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 5 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major and Supporting Fields 60 

1. HIS 450 and 496 or 497 10 

2. U.S. History 

A. HIS 371 or 377 (dependent on HIS 251, 252 selection) 5 

B. One or two courses from: 

HIS 351, 352, 354, 355, 357, 361, 363, 374, 375, 376, 379, 400, 

421, 425, 451, 455, 456, 459, 462, 463, 465, 485, 486, 496 5-10 

3. European History 
Two or three courses from: 

HIS 333, 336, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 
348, 350, 410, 411, 445, 447, 464, 483, 484, 497 10-15 

4. Russian-Asian-African-Latin American History 
Two courses from: 
HIS 310, 311, 312, 320, 321, 322, 323, 329, 330, 428, 431, 435, 481, 482 ... 10 

5. Supporting Work 20 

Ten hours each from two of the following areas: 

A. Approved 300-400 level POS electives 

B. ECO 201 and approved 300+ elective 

C. Approved electives in behavioral sciences (SOC, ANT, PSY) 

D. GEO 211, 212 and approved GEO elective 

C. Professional sequence 40 

1. EDN 200, EXC 310, EDN 335, 449, 471, 472, 473 35 

2. PSY 201 or EDN 201 5 

D. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 196 






HISTORY Ml 



Minor Concentrations 



rhc I tepartmenl o( Htsti>t\ offers a numbei ><i minoi concentrate 

\ minoi 11 i I Ustor) has great practical value Its notation on the transcript indi( 
to >>n employe! that the applicant h.is some solid liberal art th its 

accompanying insight into the development and functioning ol moden and 

that theapplu ant has made an extra effoi t to refine research and wi iting skills so essential 
to dealing with that societ] Whatever the majoi one chooses such .1 minoi will 
strengthen the student s academic record 

Students who \\oyc to work in history related fields upon graduation should 
consider adding a minoi in Preservation Studies 01 in Historical Vrchaeoli 
rhrough this program unique opportunities are provided foi qualified studei I 
gain practical experience while making a realistic assessment of tin- possibilities 
offered b) thru field ol interest Cooperative arrangements with Historic Savannah 
Foundation Georgia Historical Society, Savannah Landmark Project Oatland Island 
e enter, and with a number ol museums and historical sites, su< h as I elfair Academ) , 
it Pulaski, [uliette Lo%* Center, Wormsloe Plantation, and It King George, permit 
placement ol students in positions relating to: 

(a) archival and manuscript duration, (b) historic site administration and interpre- 
tation, (c) museum studies, ul) historic preservation, and (e) historical archaeology 

Additional minor concentrations are offered jointly with the Department ol 
Government in Internationa] Studies ^nd Russian Studies 

Minors, in addition to grades of V" or better in each course, require tin- follow ing 

Hours 

Histor) 20 

1 . rWenty hours of 500-» level 1 US courses 20 

1 [istoricaJ Archaeology 2^ 

1. PBH WI 401, 402 and 455 15 

2 ren hours from me following: HIS 341, 559, 361,371 and 450 10 

International Studios 2^ 

(assumes competency in one modern foreign language through the 
103 level*) 

1. \\ IS J29 And 325 or 326 10 

2. One course from: POS 320, 346, 348, 349 

[Wo courses from: POS429; HIS 321, 330, 350, 355,435 10 

Presen ation Studies 25 

1. HIS 450 5 

2. PBH 420. 425 and 421 or 455 15 

3. PBH 498 5 

Russian Studies 20 

1. RUS201 (assumes completion of RUS 101-103*) 5 

2. POS 349 

3. Two courses trom: His 329, 330,428,431,435,481; POS440 10 

Geography Courses 

GEO 211 Physical Geography (5-0-5) 
Fall. 

Course will include such topics as earth-sun relationships, cartography, weather, 
climate and climate classification, soils, bio-geographv. vegetation and landtorms. 
Emphasis will be on global patterns of distribution. 

GEO 212 Cultural Geography (5-0-5) 

Winter. 

Course will include such topics as the concept oi culture, population settlement, 
patterns, technological origins and diffusions, types of economics and the relation- 
ship of man to his environment. Emphasis will be given to the process o\ cultural 
chan^p throucrh timp in nl^rp 



132 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



GEO 302/ 

GEL 301 Introduction to Geology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: GEO 211 plus 10 hours of a lab science. 

An introduction to physical geology. A study of common earth materials, dynamic 
processes of change, volcanology, seismology, plate tectonics, and the structure 
and evolution of the earth's crust and inner regions. 

Introduction to Meteorology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: GEO 211 plus 10 hours of a lab science. 

An introduction to the description of the state of the atmosphere and to the physical 

laws that describe atmospheric phenomena. 

Man and the Environment (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: GEO 21 1 or 212 plus 75 quarter hours credit in college courses. 
Considerations of the interactions between humans and the support systems of the 
earth which are essential to their existence. 

Historical Biogeography 

Spring, 1994. 

A survey of interrelationships between the growth and spread of human popula- 
tions, and of other living organisms, such as crop plants, domesticated animals, 
weeds, and microbes. 

Historical Geography of North America (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1994. 

Geographic relationships in the exploration, settlement, and changing patterns of 

human occupancy of North America from the 17th century to the present. 

History Offerings 

Advanced courses in History are generally open to all students who have com- 
pleted the appropriate survey. Specifically, the Department considers background 
equivalent to HIS 114 and HIS 115, or permission of the instructor, to be the prerequisite 
for all advanced courses on European, Russian, Asian, African, and Latin American 
topics. For advanced courses in American history, the equivalent of HIS 251 or HIS 252, 
or permission of the instructor, is considered prerequisite. Exceptions are noted on 
specific courses. The department cannot guarantee the schedule of courses as specifically 
indicated. 



GEO 303/ 
MET 301 



GEO/ 
BIO 310 



GEO 353 



GEO 487 



General 

HIS 114 



HIS 115 



Civilization I (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Eligibility for college credit English, i.e. English 
101 or above. 

A survey of the main currents of political, social, religious, and intellectual activity 
from the time of the ancient Middle-Eastern civilizations to 1648. Throughout the 
course the major civilized traditions are considered and comparative methods used 
to facilitate interpretations of them. 

Civilization II (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Eligibility for college credit English, i.e. English 
101 or above. 

A survey of the main currents of political, social, religious, and intellectual activity 
from 1648 to the present. Throughout the course the major civilized traditions are 
considered and comparative methods used to facilitate interpretations of them. A 
continuation of HIS 114. 



HISTORY 133 



His 192 iinno.s ( Ivilization n (5-0-5) 

Winter or Spring Prerequisite HIS 191 or a grade oi \ mills ill 

rhia course replaces HIS 115 for selected students While the subject matter will be 

the sameasfoi I II s 1 1 i the treatment of it will var) greatl) I Ikei 

will go beyond the usual lecture method, allowing student 

earn out theii own research undei the direction oi the prof< 

his {95 Internship <\ -\ -(1-5)) Offered on application 

Prerequisites \t least 15 hours ol History courses with .i His tor) < IP \ 

sophomore status Application and credit arrangements must be made through the 

Department in advance, normall) b) mid quartet preceding the internship rrai 

students must also hat e permission from the Dean of Faculty and college from whk h 

the student comes 

Anindh iduall) designed course Involving off-< ampusstud) and resean hoi 

in an appropriate publu agehc) or private business Assignments are normally 

designed to required the full quarter tor completion during whi< h time the student 

will be under the joint supervision ot the sponsoring organization and hi 

a< ademic instru< tor Ma) be repeated for < redil 

[nternships at this \e\ el are graded on an s I basis and will In- c redited onl) among 

eta ti\ es 

His |99 Fieldwork In History (V-V-d-5)) 

Summer, 1994. 

Offered onl) b) special arrangement with the Department, made in advance, this 
course is designed to prcn ide credit for field-trip based courses or extended site 
\ isits, whether abroad or in the I .S. Research, reading, and written assignments 
will bo tailored to the specific nature ot each study tour or site visitation (Specifk 
area ot stud) will be indicated on the transcript.) rhe course may be repeated tor 
credit as topics vary, but no more than five hours may be counted among the 40 
hours required tor a major in I listor) 

HIS 450 Historical Method (3-4-5) 

Fall and Spring (evening). Required of all I listory majors and ot Presen a tion Studies 

minors 

An introduction to the nature and method of historical research, treating problems 

of investigation, organization, and writing through discussion i\nd actual rest-arch 

experience in local history. 
HIS 495 Professional Internship (V-V-(l-5)) 

Open to transient students only with permission of the Dean oi Faculty at Armstrong 
and the college from which the student comes. Prerequisites: 3.0 in all history courses; 

20 hours of upper level historv including HIS 430. 

Application and credit arrangements must be made through the department in 

advance, normally by mid-quarter preceding the quarter of internship. 

The student will pursue an individually designed course project m vol ving off-campus 

Stud) and research in a government or private agency. Projects arc normally designed 

to require the full ele\ en week quarter tor completion, during which time the student 

will be under the joint supervision of the sponsoring agency and his faculty advisor. 

May be repeated tor credit. 

I his internship, graded on an S or I basis, will be credited among related studies. 

not as a part of the minimum 40 hours ot traditional work required tor the major. 

HIS 499 Senior Thesis In History (0-6-3) 

Offered on application. Prerequisites: Senior status; 2^ hours of upper division 
Historv courses, including HIS 450; a 3.5 GPA on all Historv cou\ - 
A directed research course under the supervision of a permanent member of the 
Department of Historv. The student must tile an application with the Academic 
Affairs Committee of the History Department by mid-term of the quarter (excluding 
summer) before the student wishes to enroll tor the course. The completed thesis must 
be submitted three weeks prior to the end of the quarter. If the faculty oi the 
department approve the completed thesis for honors, the degree designation on the 
student's transcript will be noted "Honors in History. "Consult the Department Office 
for important details. 



134 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



United States History Offerings 

HIS 251 American History to 1865 (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101. 

A survey of the political, economic, and social history of the United States to end 

of the Civil War. 

HIS 252 American Since 1865 (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101. 

A survey of the political, economic, and social history of the United States from 1 865 

to the present. 

HIS 351 Popular Culture In the United States to 1914 (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1994. 

An examination of the major trends in the news media, popular literature, entertain- 
ment, and recreational activities to 1914. 

HIS 352 Popular Culture In the United States Since 1914 (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1995 (evening). 

An examination of the major trends in news media, popular literature, entertainment, 

and recreational activities since 1914. 

HIS/PBH/ 

ANT 353 Historical Archaeology I (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

The historical archaeology of the New World from the first arrival of Europeans and 
Africans to 1800. Attention will be focused on the colonialization of coastal Georgia, 
Florida, and South Carolina; the development of plantation society in the Caribbean 
and the South; and the growth of African- American culture. 

HIS 354 Studies In American Diplomacy to WW I (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1994. 

Considers American objectives and policies in foreign affairs from colonial times to 

World War I. 

HIS 355 Studies In American Diplomacy since WW I (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1995. 

Considers American objectives and policies in foreign affairs from World War I to 

the present. 

HIS 357 American Military History (5-0-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

A study of the history of warfare and military technique in their social, economic, 

and political contexts, with special emphasis on the American military tradition. 

HIS 361 The Old South (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1994. 

Economic, cultural, and political history of the antebellum South with emphasis on 

those factors that made the South a unique section of the nation. 

HIS 363 Economic History of the United States (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1995. Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

This course surveys the growth and development of economic institutions in the 
United States from the colonial period to the present, with emphasis on the period 
since 1860. Developments in agriculture, industry, labor, transportation, and finance 
will be studied and analyzed. 

HIS 371 Colonial and Revolutionary America (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1996. 

A study of the discoveries of the New World and the settlement and growth of the 
English colonies of North America; triumph over France in the New World, the 
drastic change in British colonial policy and the rise of American opposition to it, 
the achievement of independence, and the establishment of the United States under 
the Constitution. 






HISTORY 135 



his 174 Women In American iiisioi\ (5-0 I) 
Wlntei : 

Women in American Historj tn examination of the cha 
economi< roles ol the Vmeri< in woman from< <'Iimu.iI i 
tit will be given to the pre ( i \ 1 1 w .» t feminist reform movemei 
social and economic role aftei the wai her .iw.ikrmng .m .u< 
political powei and tl>« - mid 20th century revolution 

ins Civil War and Reconstruction (5-0-5) 

Wintei ' 

I he causes and significance ol the American < ivil War, with mini 

or tin- military campaign; political, economit and social asp mstrw ti<>n 

His |7i \ tctorian America (5-0-5) 

Pall 199< 

P re s e n tation of the major subjects of the late 1 9th century, irw ludingtheemei 

ol a national economy, its theory and policies; partisan and reform politics; the 

moral and Constitutional dimensions ol Reconstruction; American societ) and 

social thought; and territorial aggrandisement 

His 377 Recent America (5-0-5) 

Winter, I 

An analysis of the institutions and forces which molded Ameru an life from tin- late 

19th century 1 1890) through World \\ ar II. in< luding political, economi< . so< ial and 

inteilectual issues 
His 379 Contemporary America (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1994 [e\ ening). 

An examination of the society of the United States since World War II, with spe< ial 

emphasis gh en to the major social and cultural trends 

HIS 400 Seminar In American History (5-0-5) 

Permission ol instructor required tor admission. 

1 >esigned to permit a group of advanced students to pursue intensh e research on a 
special topic in the field to be defined by the instructor. 

HIS/ 

PBH 421 Architectural History (4-2-5) 

Fall, 1994 

A study of various styles ol American architecture, Georgian, Federal, Neoclassical, 

Eclecticism and modern; slides from Historic American Building Surve) ; landscape 
architecture. Visiting speakers and field trips will be used. 

HIS/ 

PBH 425 American Vernacular Architecture (4-2-5) 

Spring, 1W4. Prerequisite: PBH 421 or permission ot instructor. 

An interdisciplinary study of the historic built environment with emphasis on 

traditional and popular architecture. Recording techniques, research strategies, and 
theoretical approaches, past and present, will be examined. 

HIS 451 Reform Movements In American History (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1995. 

A studv of the reform movements in America since the Revolution. 

HIS/PBH/ 

ANT 455 Historical Archaeology (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1995. Prerequisite: PBH 207, or permission of the instructor. 

An introduction to the archaeology of North America since the arrival of Europeans 

in the New World. Some attention will be paid to British and Continental Post 

medieval Archaeology as well as to the special areas oi Industrial and Nautical 

Archaeology. Emphasis will be given to anthropological archeology's method and 

theory both as perspective for the writing of history and as a component of Historic 

Preservation. 



136 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



HIS 456 History of Savannah and Georgia (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1995. 

Begins with a history of Indians, emphasis on the founding of the colons at 
Savannah and on the colonial, Revolutionary, antebellum and Post-Civil War 
periods. Political, economic, social, religious and artistic trends are discussed and 
placed in context of Georgia and U.S. historv. 
The course will involve considerable research in primary sources available locally. 

HIS/PBH/ 

ANT 459 American Material Culture (4-2-5) 
Winter, 1996. 

An introduction to the study of the non-literary remains of our society, past and 
present. Vernacular and polite architecture, ceramics, mortuary art, community 
and settlement patterns, dress, diet, and diseases are among the topics that will be 
discussed. 

HIS 462 Americans Called Indians (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ANT 201 . 

An investigation of the aboriginal cultures of North American from the Arctic to the 
Rio Grande. Study will include origins, distribution, ecology and interrelationships, 
past through present. 

HIS/ 

PBH 463 Folklife (3-4-5) 

Fall, 1994. 

A survey of the creation and persistance of tradition in societies and of the process 
of change, as demonstrated in such aspects as narrative, music, song, celebration, 
festival belief, and material culture. Emphasis will be given to understanding the 
multi-ethnic nature of the traditions in American life. 

HIS 465 Technology and Culture II: 1900 to the Present (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1995 (evening). 

An examination of developments in the historv of technology in the twentieth 
century. The course defines technology broadly, rather than stressing specific 
machines; and emphasizes the relationships among American technology, society, 
and culture. 

HIS 485/486 Independent Study In United States History (V-V-(l-5)) 

Available each quarter. Prerequisites: HIS 450 and at least 15 additional hours in 
upper division History courses (with a minimum GPA of 3.0), an overall GPA of 2.5 
(after completion of 120 hours), and an approved application. Open to transient 
students only with the permission of the Dean of Faculty of Armstrong and the college 
from which the student comes. 

Designed to permit superior students to pursue individual research and reading in the 
chosen field under the supervision of a member of the History faculty. An application 
must be filed with the department, in advance, normally by mid-quarter preceding 
the independent study. A full description of the requirements and an application may 
be obtained in the departmental office. 

HIS 496 American Historiography (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1996. 

See major program outlines, part B.l, for the historiography requirement. 

A study of the writing of American history from colonial times to the present with 

emphasis on the historical philosophies and interpretations of the major schools of 

thoughts as well as individual historians. Recommended especially to students 

contemplating graduate work in History. 

European History Offerings 

HIS 333 Modern Germany, 1789-1933 (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1994. 

A study of Germany from the pluralism of the Holy Roman Empire through the 
German confederation to the unified Reich. Attention will be given to the political, 
social, and cultural developments in Austria, Prussia, and the "Third Germany." 



HISTORY 137 



nis Modem I ast t intra] I urop 

: \ e) ol tin- hiNt t »r\ ol the natioi 
_i>th centuries lopi d irx lude tl 

Independence problems in establisJ 
ind the establishment of communist coi 
Ills |4Q ,sh Hittorj i 185-1660 (5-0-5) 

malysis ol political, constitutional economic 
rudors and ear l\ Stuarts, including the I nglish ( i\ il \\ .ir 
His mi i nglish History, 1660-1815 (5-0-5) 

An investigation ol the Restoration monarchies, the< onstitutnxi.il revolution < I 
the rise of ministerial responsibility in the earl) 18thcentur) I 
revolt, and England's relationship to the I rench Revolution 

his |42 tadenl Historj (5-0-5) 

Fall. 1994. 

A stud) ol the earl) civilizations ol the Middle I ast, the i states, th»- 

Roman republic and empire, with special emphasis on the social, political and 
cultural contributions ol these ancient peoples 

HIS 343 Early Middle Ages, A.D. 333 - c. 1000 (5-0-5) 

Winter, . 

I he histor) ol Europe from the fall of the Roman Empire through the c arolingian 
period with special emphasis on the institutional developments which led to the 
emergence ol stable kingdoms out of the chaos ol the barbarian invasions 

HIS 344 The High Middle Ages, c. 1000 to c. 1300(5-0-5) 

I he history of Europe from c. 1000 to 1300 with emphasis on the struggle between 
church and state, the Crusade movement, and the 12th century intellectual renais- 
sance, all of which profoundly influenced the development of the various medieval 
kingdoms. 

HIS34 = i The Late Middle Ages and Renaissance (5-0-5) 

Summer, 1995. 

The histor) of Europe from c. 1 300 to 1517 with emphasis on the political, cultural, and 
intellectual developments which transformed medieval and Renaissance society. 

HIS 346 Reformation Era (5-0-5) 

Winter. 1995 

A study of the controversial era emphasizing its major issues and movements, and 
their development through the I hirtj "> ears War. Political, social, and economic, as 
well as religious facets of the upheaval will be considered. 

HIS 34" Europe In the Eighteenth Century (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1994. 
I his course covers the period from the reign of I ouis \IV to the French Revolution, 

considering the major political, social, and intellectual trends on the Continent. 
Particular emphasis is placed on France. 

HIS 348 Europe In the Nineteenth Century (5-0-5) 

Winter. 19 

A study of the most important social, political, and intellectual directions of European 
history from the Congress of Vienna to the end of the nineteenth century. 

HIS 350 Europe In the Twentieth Century (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1994 (evening). 

A study of the major developments in Europe since l u ' I 
HIS 410 Seminar In European History (5-0-5) 

Permission of instructor required tor admission. 

A detailed analysis of a specific problem in European history by examination of 

primary materials. 



138 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

HIS 411 Seminar on the Crusades (5-0-5) 

Summer, 1994. 

An examination of the 12th and 13th century Crusade movement through the studv 

of the available primary source material. 

HIS 445 Seminar In Medieval History (5-0-5) 

A treatment of selected topics in medieval history working from primary source 
materials. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. 

HIS 447 The French Revolution and Napoleon (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1995. 

This course examines the background and events of the French Revolution and the 

career of Napoleon. Different interpretations are considered. 

HIS 464 Technology and Culture I: The Industrial Revolution to 1900 (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1995. 

An examination of developments in the history of technology from 1700 to 1900. The 

course defines technology broadly, rather than stressing specific machines, and 

emphasizes relationships among European and American technology, societies, and 

cultures. 

HIS 483/484 Independent Study In European History (V-V-U-5)) 

Available each quarter. Prerequisites: HIS 450 and at least 15 additional hours in 
upper division History courses (with a minimum GPA of 3.0), an overall GPA of 2.5 
(after completion of 120 hours), and an approved application. Open to transient 
students only with the permission of the Dean of Faculty at Armstrong and the college 
from which the student comes. 

Designed to permit superior students to pursue individual research and reading in the 
chosen field under the supervision of a member of the History faculty. An application 
must be filed with the department, in advance, normally by mid-quarter preceding 
the independent study. A full description of the requirements and an application may 
be obtained in the departmental office. 

HIS 497 European Historiography (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1995 (evening). See major program outlines, part B.l, for the historiography 

requirement. 

A studv of the writers of history in the Western cultural tradition, with an emphasis 

on the historical philosophies, interpretations, and problems raised by the major 

modern European historians. Recommended especially to students contemplating 

graduate work in History. 

Russian, Asian, African and Latin American History Courses 

HIS 310 Latin America (5-0-5) 

An introductory course in Latin-American history with consideration given to 
institutions of the areas as well as events and personalities. 

HIS 311 The Caribbean (5-0-5) 

A study of the historical development of the Caribbean from European conquest 
and colonization to twentieth-century nationalism. Emphasis will be given to 
understand present-day Caribbean Cultures. 

HIS 312 History of Africa (5-0-5) 

A survey of African civilizations from ancient times, with major emphasis on 
development of the continent since 1800. 

HIS 320 Traditional China (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1994. 

The history of Chinese civilization from ancient times to the early nineteenth 

century, with emphasis on its characteristic political, social, economic, and cultural 

developments. 

HIS 321 Modern China (5-5) 

Spring, 1995 (evening). 

The history of China from the nineteenth century to the present, with emphasis on 

political, social, economic, and intellectual developments. 



HISTORY 139 



Mis | Histon of i.ip.m (M I) 

Kill 

rveyof the history of Japan from the earliest times tot hr | 
emphasis on its env i siru <• tin 

His - Hittorj of flu- Middle I Mi (5-€ I) 

Spring 

\mh\i'\ i>i Middle I astern histor) from Muhammad to the j 
culture and < u ilization \ mphasiswillbepla< ed on the background 
and i onflicta in the region 

ins |29 Medieval Ruasii (5-0-5) 

Pall 1996 

t survey ol theeconomk sot ial,and politic aide* elopmentot the Russian atari 

its foundation In the9thcentury through its modernization b) Petei tht- 1 , rr.it in the 

earl) 18th century 
His *30 Modern Rusaia (5-0-5) 

I all 1994 (evening) 

A lun ej ol Russian history from Peter the< ireal to tin- present. I he major political, 

cultural, economic ,and kk ialde\ etopmentsoJ Russia in both the Imperial and - 

periods w ill be covered. 

HIS 428 Russia and the West (5-0-5) 

ing, 1994. 
A detailed stud) of the impact ot \\ estem influence on the Musom ite state in the 
sixteenth and s t >\ enteenth centuries 

HIS 431 The Russian Revolution (5-0-5) 

Winter. 1995. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

An examination ol the Russian revolutionary tradition, the causes tor the collapse 

of [sarism, the Boishevik Revolution, and victory in the Russian (. ivil War 

HIS 435 History of Soviet Foreign Policy (5-0-5) 

Spring, 1994. 

I his course reviews historically the development of soviet foreign polic) toward 
\\ estem European states, notably t lermany, and also with the non-1 uropean world 

through 1917-1940, World War II, ,md cold War phases Special attention will he 
given in this last phase to U.S.-Soviet rivalry. Soviet relations with other 
communist states m Eastern Europe, China, and the I hird World, and to the recent 

moves toward detente. 
HIS 481/482 Independent Studv In Russian/Asian/African/Latin-American 
History (V-Vd-5)) 

Available each quarter. Prerequisites: HIS 450 and at least 15 additional hours in 
upper division History courses (with a minimum GPA ot 3.0), an overall GPAof2 5 
(after completion of 120 hours), and ,\n approved application. Open to transient 
students only with the permission of the Deanol Faculty at Armstrong and the college 
from which the student comes. 

1 tesigned to permit superior students to pursue individual research ^nd reading in the 
chosen field under the supervision ot a member of the I hstorv faculty. An application 
must be tiled w ith the department, in advance, normally by mid-quarter preceding 
the independent study. A full description ot merequirementsand an application may 
be obtained in the departmental office 

Public History Offerings 
PBH/ 

ANT 207 Introduction to Archaeologv (5-0-5) 
Fall, 1994. 
The introductory archaeologv course consists of a history of the field, basic 

techniques, theoretical underpinnings, and examples of field work from all types of 
excavation. It covers the range from early man to industrial and urban archeology 
in a general fashion. Analysis is introduced along with survey techniques, preser- 
vation reporting and other skills. 



140 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PBH 295 Internship (V-V-(l-5)) 

Offered on application. Prerequisites: At least 15 hours of History courses with a 
History GPA of 2.5 and sophomore status. Application and credit arrangements must 
be made through the Department in advance, normally by mid-quarter preceding the 
internship. Transient students must also have permission from the Dean of Faculty 
and college from which the student comes. 

An individually designed course involving off-campus study and research or work 
in an appropriate public agency or private business. Assignments are normally 
designed to required the full quarter for completion, during which time the student 
will be under the joint supervision of the sponsoring organization and his/her 
academic instructor. May be repeated for credit. 

Internships at this level are graded on an S/U basis and will be credited only among 
electives. 



HTS/PBH7 

ANT 353 



PBH/ 

ANT 401 



PBH/ 

ANT 402 



Historical Archaeology I (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

The historical archaeology of the New World from the first arrival of Europeans and 
Africans to 1800. Attention will be focused on the colonialization of coastal Georgia, 
Florida, and South Carolina; the development of plantation society in the Caribbean 
and the South; and the growth of African- American culture. 

Fieldwork In Historical Archaeology (0-20-10) 

Spring. 

Prerequisite: PBH 207 or permission of instructor or director. 
An introduction to and first application of archaeological methods to a specific field 
project. Excavation techniques, surveying and map making, data collecting and 
recording, archaeological photography, the identification and analysis of art facts, 
and the interpretation or archaeological data will be presented in field and labora- 
tory work as well as in lectures and readings. (Under certain circumstances this 
course may be substituted in the Preservation Studies minor for PBH 498). Course 
may be repeated for credit. 



Practicum In Archaeological Analysis (2-6-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

The application of archaeological interpretative techniques to a specific site or 
analytical problem. Individual research projects in the interpretation of archaeo- 
logical data and the conservation of artifactual finds with special attention to the 
care and storage of collections, display in the museum setting, and the presentation 
of archaeologically-derived information. (Under certain circumstances this course 
may be substituted in the Museum Studies minor for PBH 495). 

PBH 420 Historic Preservation (5-0-5) 

Winter, 1994 (evening). 

Students may find HIS 450 to be useful preparation for this course. 

An examination of the field including values, principles, practices, development of 

planning and organization for preservation; preservation law, economics and politics. 



PBH/HIS 421 American Architectural History (4-2-5) 

Fall, 1994 (evening). 

A study of various styles of American architecture, Georgian, Federal, Neoclassical, 

Eclecticism and modern; slides from Historic American 

Building Survey; landscape architecture. Visiting speakers and field trips will be 

used. 



PBH/ 
HIS 425 



American Vernacular Architecture (4-2-5) 

Spring 1994. Prerequisite: HIS/PBH 421 or permission of instructor. 
An interdisciplinary study of the historic built environment with emphasis on 
traditional and popular architecture. Recording techniques, research strategies, 
and theoretical approaches, past and present, will be examined. (Also listed as 
HIS 425.) 



HISTORY 



141 



PBH His 

\\i ;<> 



PBH His 
\\l 159 



PBH 4<m) 



PBH 4b2 



PBH/ 
HIS 463 



PBH 480 



PBH 481 



PBH 495 



PBH 498 



Historical trchaeolog) 

\s intei Prerequisite PBI I I the inttm 

I heart haeolog) of North Vmericaaince the arrival of I ui 
Some attention will be paid to British and Continent 

L»s tothespei ial areas of Industrial and Nautical \i 
• .H> haeologi< al arc haeolog) s method and ttv 
tor the writing ot histor) and as .« component ol Hi tion 

Vnu'iu.in Material ( nlture < 1-2*5) 

Fall, 

An introduction to tin- study of the non-literar) remains of our n • and 

nt Vernacular and polite architecture, ceramics, mortuar) .irt, community 
and settlement patterns, dress* clu-t . and disease >irc among tin- topics that will be 
discussed 
Archival studies (4-2-3) 

quisite I lis 4^0 or permission o( instructor. 
An introduction to the archivist as a proft-ssion.il and to the role ot archivi 
\ sur\i'\ ot documentary materials and o\ principals and practio 
volved in their acquisition, cataloging, care, and retrieval in public and private 
facilities will also be included. 
Museum Studies (4-2-5) 
Spring, 1994. 

A survey ot the de\ elopment ot museums in the I nited States and ot the ethics and 
practices of the museum profession, to include collections management, planning, 
outreach, and public education. 

Folklife (3-4-5) 

A sun e\ of the creation and persistence of tradition in societies mu\ of the pi 
of change, as demonstrated in such aspects as narrative, music, Song, celebration. 
festival belief, and material culture. Emphasis will be given to understanding the 
multi-ethnic nature of the traditions in American lite. 

Special Topics In Archaeology (V-V-d -5)) 

Prerequisites: AN! PBH207,AN1 PBH 401. 

The course is designed to otter a wide variety of experience to advanced, upper level 

students in archaeological techniques. Subject matter will center on such topics as 
archaeological graphics, fauna! analysis (zooarchaeology),consen ation, or involve 
some off-campus archaeological experience. 

Special Topics In Historic Preservation (V-V-0-5)) 
Prerequisites: PBH 420. 

The course is designed to offer a wide variety of experience to advanced, upper le\ el 
students in historic preservation. Subject matter will center on such topics as 
preservation philosophy, rural preservation, urban planning or involve some off- 
campus activity. 

Internship In Museum Studies (V-V-5) 

Prerequisites: PBH 4r»0 ,^no\ 462 with a "C" or better in each course. 
The student will pursue an individually designed course project involving off- 
campus study and research in a government or private agency invoh ed in museum 
work. Projects are normally designed to require the full eleven week quarter to 
completion, during which time the student will be under the joint supervision of the 
sponsoring agency and his faculty sponsor. 

Internship In Preservation Studies (V-V-5) 

Prerequisites: PBH 420 and 421 or 42^ with a "C" or better in each course. 
The student will pursue an individually designed course project involving off- 
campus study and research in an appropriate preservation agency. Proje^:- 
normally designed to require the full eleven week quarter tor completion, during 
which time the student will be under the joint supervision of the sponsoring agency 
and his faculty sponsor. 



142 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Languages, Literature, and Dramatic Arts 

Faculty 

Vacant, Department Head 

* Andrews, Carol Mellen, Peter 
Clancy Frank Noble, David 

* Cooksey, Thomas Nordquist, Richard 
Cottrell, Isabel * Raymond, Richard 
Fodor, Gary * Roth, Lorie 
Hollinger, Karen Smith, James 
Jamison, Carol * Strozier, Robert 
Jenkins, Marvin Weingarten, Barry 
Marinara, Martha Welsh, John 
Martin William 

* Graduate Faculty 

English Composition 

Entering students should begin the required English core sequence in their initial 
quarter of attendance. Students must not delay beginning this sequence beyond their 
second quarter of attendance. Students must enroll in the appropriate course in the core 
sequence and do so each quarter until they complete the sequence and /or pass the 
Regents' Test. ENG 101, 102, and 201 courses may not be dropped without permission of 
the, Department Head. Students who do drop these courses without Department Head 
approval will receive a failing grade in the class. 

Exemptions from Core English 

Students who wish credit exemption for English 101 must take the CLEP College 
Composition and Essay examination and make a score of 53 (Grade equivalent of a "B") 
and make a "C" or above in English 102. Students who wish a credit exemption for 
English 102 must take the CLEP Analysis and Interpretation of Literature and Essay 
Examination and make a score of 55 (Grade equivalent of "B") and make a "C" or above 
in English 201. Students who make these scores in English 101 and 102 exams must make 
a "C" or above in English 201 to receive credit exemption for those courses. 

Students who score "3" or above on the AP exam also will receive credit exemption for 
English 101, providing that they make "C" or better in English 102. 

English Composition Transfer Credit 

Transfer students from outside the University System of Georgia who have not yet 
completed the required English courses prescribed by Armstrong degree programs 
should visit the Director of Composition for a placement interview. At this interview, the 
Director of Composition will evaluate student transcripts for English credits, administer 
the English Placement Test (if necessary), provide information on the composition 
sequence and the Georgia Regents' Test, and determine placement in the appropriate 
composition course. Interview schedules are available in the Office of the Registrar and 
in the Department of Languages, Literature, and Dramatic Arts. 

Foreign Languages 

Students who, while enrolled at Armstrong State College, take their foreign language 
courses on another campus must pass an appropriate national standardized test with a 
score not lower than the 60 percentile on each part to receive credit for 103 and /or 201. 
Students transferring to Armstrong State College, after having completed the required 
foreign language sequence at another college, with "C's" or above, are not required to 
complete the proficiency examinations at Armstrong. 






LANGUAGES. LITERATURE. AND DRAMATIC ARTS 143 

Exemptions from Foreign Languages 

Students who wish -\ credit exemption foi khe I rem h <m Spanish requirement i 
make a score of 45 (Grade equivalent of a B ) on the CLEP exam, and make a ( orb< 
in the appropriate 201 < lass Students who wish .1 credit exemption t<" German 
make a score of 44 (Grade equivalent of a 'B")andmak< r higher in German 

l 01 further information students should contact me Head o( the Department oi 1 an 
ges Literature and Dramatii \'t s or Ms Benson in Counseling and Placement 

Satisfying Core Requirements 

Students majoring in I nglish or in Drama Speech should s.itist\ the colli 
requirements for the Bachelor ol \rts degree during the freshman and sophomore years 

The "C" Average for Courses in Major and Minor 

Students must earn .1 grade ol ( or better in each JOO or 400 le\ el < ourse in< luded 
in any major or minor area 

CPC Requirement 

1 he CPC deficiency in foreign languages maj be fulfilled h\ successfully completing 
am ol the lOO-lo elcouTses in Spanish, French, I atin,or( lerman ivitha final course grade 
ol C or better, 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 
WITH A MAJOR IN ENGLISH 

Hours 

\ i ieneral Requirements 101 

Vrea 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192,201 or 292 15 

2. One from ART 200, 271 272 ,273; DRS 201; M US 200; PHI 201 5 

Vrea II 20 

1 IWofrom MAT 101,103,290 10 

2. Laboratory science sequence 10 

Area ID 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. One from AN I 201; ECO 201, 202; PSY 101; SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. Foreign language sequence through 201 20 

2. IWo from AR1 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 227, 228; 
MUS200;PHI201;t s U5 10 

Area V 6 

1. PE L03or I08and 117 3 

2. rhree acti\ itv courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 

B. Courses in the Major Field 50 

1. ENG 301 5 

2. ENG 311 ,md 312 10 

3. ENG 315 and 316 10 

4. ENG 445 or 446 5 

5. One from: ENG 441, 447, 430, 456, cm- 457 

6. One from: ENG 463, 452, 453 

7. One from: ENG 436, 437, 438, 464 

8. One from: English 372, 470. 474. 475, 480 or 482 5 



144 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



C. Related Field Requirements 25 

Five courses numbered 300 or above in the School of Arts & Sciences or 

the Division of Education 25 

D. Electives 15 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH A 
MAJOR IN ENGLISH (WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATION) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One from ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 201; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103 or 220 or 290 10 

2. Laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. PSY101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. Foreign language sequence through 201 20 

2. DRS 228 or 341 5 

3. One from ANT 201; ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Courses in the Major Field 40 

1. ENG 301 5 

2. ENG 311 and 312 10 

3. ENG 313 or 314 5 

4. ENG 315 or 316 5 

5. ENG 445 or 446 5 

6. ENG 470 5 

7. ENG 480 or 482 5 

C. Related Field Requirements 15 

1. DRS/FLM 350, 351, 340 or 349 5 

2. Approved electives 10 

D. Professional Sequence 45 

1. EDN 200; EXC 310, EDN 335, 428 or 445, 439, 471, 472, 473 40 

2. PSY 201 or EDN 201 5 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 201 



LANGUAGES. LITERATURE. AND DRAMATIC ARTS 



145 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 
WITH A MAJOR IN DRAMA-SPEECH 



neral Requirements 



Houn 
101 



\re.» 

I 

1 

1 



1 

2 
i 



l ENG UM . in: or 192,201 oi 292 

OnefromARl 200, 271 ' 0; PHI 201 

II 



\l \l 101 290 10 

Laborator) science sequence i<' 

in 

His iu. L15or 192; POS ll J 

Onefrom ANT 201; ECO 201; PSi 101;SCX 201 

l\ 

I oreigr language sequence through 201 20 

DRS228 

DRS227 

V h 



n 103 or 1HS and 117 3 

I hree actn it) courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

1 Us 251 or 252 5 

B. Courses in the Major Field 4^ 

1. DRS300 

2. DRS341 5 

DRS344 5 

DRS 346 5 

DRS450 5 

Choice of DRS 340, 349, 350, 351,401 10 

Choice of DRS 303, 342, 345, 347, 400, 447, 451,452; ENG 300, 501, 

or 502 5 

v 1 NG 301 5 

C. Courses in Related Field 30 

1. ENG 443 or 44b, 460, 465, 456, 437 20 

2. One from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 201; MLS 200; PHI 201 3 

3. One from I 1\ 2 5 

D. Electives 15 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations _ 



rOTAL lm 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 
WITH A MAJOR IN ENGLISH (Communications) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 13 

2. One from ART 200, 271. 272 273; DRS 201; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 



1. Two from: 

MAT 101, 103, 290 

2. Laboratory science sequence. 



10 
10 



146 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. One from: ANT 201; ECO 201, 202; PSY 101; SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. Foreign language sequence through 201 20 

2. CS 115, and one from ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200; 

PHI 201 10 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

State Requirement 5 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

B. Courses in the Major Field 45 

1. ENG 311 or 312 5 

2. ENG 313 or 314 5 

3. ENG 315 or 316 5 

4. Three from ENG 372, 470, 474, 475, JRN 343 15 

5. Three from ENG 473, 480, 482, JRN 400, FLM 401 15 

C. Related Field Requirements 25 

1. Two from DRS 228, 341, 349 10 

2. Two from ART 204, ENG 500, 501, 502, ENG 499, DRS 400 10 

3. One from FLM 340, 349, 350, 351 5 

D. Electives 20 

1. Electives 20 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 

Minor Concentrations 

The following minor concentrations are available from the Department of Languages, 
Literature, and Dramatic Arts. For completion of each of the minors, the student must 
earn a "C" or better in each course offered for the minor. 
The minors and their requirements are: 

Hours 
Communications 20 

1. Two from ENG 470, 372, 474, 475, DRS/FLM 349, JRN 343 10 

2. Two from ENG 473, 480, 482, JRN 400, FLM 401 10 

English 20 

English electives numbered 300 or above (only 5 hours of 499) 20 

Film 20 

1. DRS/FLM 340, 351 10 

2. DRS/FLM 350, DRS/FLM 401 10 

Foreign Language 20 

Language electives numbered 300 or above 20 

Linguistics 20 

Courses selected from ENG 480, 482; LIN 500 20 

Philosophy 20 

Philosophy electives numbered 300 or above 20 



LANGUAGES. LITERATURE. AND DRAMATIC ARTS 






Drama-Speech Offerings 

Sua essful v ompletion ol I NG IU I is pit-requisite to all I >Ks uuirscs with the exception 

ol DRS I ind h • 

i>ks 201 i Keatrc ap preci ati on (5-0-S) 

An Introdw Hon to the theatre as in art form and .« profession students will stud) 
the various roles o( playwright .uim designei din 
theatre manager; the >. ollaborath t nature ol theatre the relationship ot tru 
other art tonus and tin- organizational stun hire oi educational! oonununit 
professional theatre 

DRS 227 rhealii laboratory (0-3-1) 

c offered e> ei \ quai 

PracticaJ experieiM ein theatre. I he student will work on the Masquers production 

of the quarter Onlj one hour of credit ma) be earned per quartet rhe maximum 

total credit a l lowe d in I heatre l aborator) is five quarter hours 

lu the summer students may take up to five hours, redil in I >RS227by working part 

time in summer theatre workshop (DRS 450) 

DRS 22fl Speech Communication (S-0-5) 

Offered e> er) quarter. 

Practice and theory ol interpersonal communication mu\ public speaking. Students 
dr\ elop skills through pra< tice ol the individual parts ( >t speech, working in small 
groups, and through the performance ol vocal exercises m^\ oral readings 
student prepares and delivers several major speeches, including extemporaneous 
and impromptu ones 

DRS 300 Introduction to Acting (5-0-5) 

A beginning course in acting which focuses on basic stage movement, fundamen- 
tals of voice M^d diction, improvisation, dramatic imagination, memory, scene 
analysis, and performance ol scenes and monologues from con te mporary drama. 

DRS 301 Interpersonal Communication (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ENG 101. 

The study of human communication as a complex sot of on-going transactions. I he 
student will explore and apply behavioral theories concerning how to create and 

maintain successful relationships, m and out of the work place. 

DRS 302 Small Group Communication (5-0-5) 
Prerequisite ENG 101. 

The study of various communication theories concerning how and why work 
groups succeed or tail in respect to achieving the twin goals of task completion and 
group harmony. Course assignments allow the students to implement the above 
mentioned theories in task-oriented group projects 

DRS 303 Creative Dramatics and Children's Theatre (5-0-5) 

An introduction to 1 ) the elements of dramatic performance for all ages and groups. 

2) the teaching of dramatic arts to children, and 3) the production of plays tor an 
audience o\ children or other special groups. Students explore how various ele- 
ments which make up a dramatic event, including improvisational-based acting 
and storytelling, can be used as teaching devices. All aspects of production will be 
studied, such as play selection, performance techniques, elementary design and 
stagecraft, and industrial and technical resources. Designed tor education majors 
and drama-speech majors. 

DRS 304 Stagecraft (5-0-5) 

A systematic introduction to the fundamentals of scenic design, construction and 
rigging. The course will rely heavily on hands-on experience with the tools, 
techniques and materials used in mounting a stage production. 

DRS/FLM 340 Development of the Cinema (5-0-5) 
SameasFLM 340. 

A study of the history and development of the cinema with special emphasis on the 
American dominance of the medium. 



148 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



DRS 341 Oral Interpretation (5-0-5) 

The oral interpretation of poetry and prose. The techniques of literary analysis and 
the vocal techniques needed to communicate an author's mood and meaning are 
stressed. 

DRS 342 Acting II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: DRS 200, at least two credit hours in DRS 227, or permission of 
instructor. 

Intensive study of characterization and styles of acting from several points; 
historical, critical, practical, theoretical, and experimental. Emphasis on develop- 
ment of performance skills. 

DRS 344 History of the Theatre (5-0-5) 

A survey of theatrical art from its beginnings through the Elizabethan period, 
emphasizing theatrical conventions of Greek, Roman, medieval, and Elizabethan 
theatre. 

DRS 345 History of the Theatre (5-0-5) 

A survey of theatrical art of the world, emphasizing theatrical conventions from the 
Restoration to the present. 

DRS 346 Play Directing I (5-0-5) 

The theory and practice of acting and directing with special attention to image- 
making on stage. Individuals under supervision prepare and execute the production 
of scenes and short plays. 

DRS 347 Theatre Management (5-0-5) 

Combines theory and practice in theatre management. Students will learn about 
budget planning, revenue, box office, publicity, royalties, literary management, 
public relations, selection of theatrical seasons, guilds, unions, and other manage- 
ment aspects of the theatre. 

DRS/FLM 349 Television Theory and Criticism (5-0-5) 

A study of television theory and criticism with special emphasis on television as a 
media form. Topics include: television spectatorship, genres, production, and 
scholarship. 

DRS/FLM/ 

JRN 350 Film as an Art (5-0-5) 

Spring. Same as FLM 350 and JRN 350. 

Study of film with emphasis on critical appreciation of film as an art form. 

DRS/FLM 351 Film and Literature (5-0-5) 

Same as FLM 351. 

Studies in the translation of literature to film with emphasis on the differences of the 

media in form, content and perception. 

DRS/FLM 373 Rhetoric (5-0-5) 

See ENG/DRS 373 for course description. 

DRS 400 Special Topics In Communications (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Prerequisite: ENG 101. 

The special subject matter in this course is announced when the course is offered. 

DRS/FLM 401 Topics In Film (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Film 350 or 351. 

The special subject matter of this course will be announced when the course is offered. 

Topics include: Film Genres, Auteurs, and Critical Theory. 

DRS 447 Stage Managers and Designers Laboratory (0-2-2) 

Offered every quarter. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 
Practical experience in theatre for stage managers and designers in lighting, 
costume, make-up, and set. The student will work on the Masquers production of 
the quarter. Only two hours of credit may be earned per quarter. The maximum 
credit allowed in this Laboratory is 6 quarter hours. In the summer students may 
take up to five hours credit in DRS 447 by working part time in the summer theatre 
workshop (DRS 450). (See DRS 227 for credit for students not involved in stage 
management or design work.) 



LANGUAGES. LITERATURE. AND DRAMATIC ARTS I4i 



DRS i*< 

151 152 I'l.im.i Workshop (0-15-5) 

Summn »»i\K 

Sununei »to« k theatre Un i redii Studenl 

of the faculty who is a professional in the theatre Alia ; 

studied Students ma) earn credit foi DRS 150 b) participating in an 

sununei sto< k compan) with prior written approval >>i .1 faculty theatre dm 

DRS 190 Independent Stud) (1-5MM1-5) 

1. Iffered on demand Prerequisites Senior status plus I V . 101 plus.it 

DRS course Open to transient students onl) with the permission ol iculry 

al A rmstr ong and tin- college from m hich tin- student com 

English Offerings 

Please Note: l NG 201 is prerequisite to all I NG 300-400 courses. ENG311 and 312are 
quisite tor all 1 ngliah courses 130 through 499, except 1 N< ! 570 through 

I \c. i)25 Composition Review (5-0-5) 

Institutional Credit. 

Designed to correct deficiencies in writing rev ealed b) tin- Regents' rest Prerequi- 
site t. ompletion ot the English *.orf requirements ot tin- student's program. 

ENG 101 I omposition I (5-0-5) 
Offered each quarter. 

Each student must attain at least one ot the following prior to enrolling 
ot at least 380SA1 Verbal and 40 or above on the ISWl (Test of Standard Written 

English), or 20 on the verbal section of the ACT, or (b) a passing SCOTC on the 

placement CPE in English m^\ in Reading, or (c) exit Develop m ental studies 

; ish and Developmental Studies Reading successfully. 
1 or the student having demonstrable ability in reading, writing, and organizing. 

I he student will sharpen composition skills bv writing themes of varying length 
and complexity utilizing techniques learned from intensive study o( essays. I hi- 
course also aims to increase the student's awareness o\ language itself. Readings in 
addition to the essay may be used. 
ENG 102 Composition II (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of ENG li'l or ENG 191. 
Gives the student guided practice in reading and composition skills. The course 
introduces literary forms and language — fiction, poetry, drama — using readings in 
and study of those forms to stimulate the writing of interpretive and critical papers. 

ENG 192 Honors Composition and Introduction to Literature (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of"B" in English 101 and the recommendation 

ot the English 101 instructor and approval of the Department Head. 
The student will read and write in greater depth than in English 102. 

ENG 201 Selections In World Literature (5-0-5) 

Ottered each quarter. Prerequisite: ENG 102 or ENG 19Z 

Completes the Core 1 sequence. Organized around literary and extra-literarv 
materials, the course facilitates student investigation of enduring issues and ideas 
found in world literature. Research techniques are introduced. The specific content 
in each section of this course is announced quarterly. 

ENG 292 Honors Composition and Literature (5-0-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of "C" in English 192 or minimum grade of"B" 
in English 102 and the recommendation oi the English 102 instructor. 
The student will read and write in greater depth than in English 201. 

ENG 301 Introduction to Literary Studies (5-0-5) 

Fall or Spring. 

Familiarizes the English major with the vocabulary and approaches oi modern 
literary criticism, advances abilities in the reading and interpretation oi literary 
texts, and promotes understanding of the tools oi literary research and writing. 



150 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

ENG 302 Introduction to Composition Studies (5-0-5) 

Students apply theories on the teaching of composition by devising assignments, 
conducting class sessions, writing essays, and responding to academic writing. 

ENG 311 Survey of English Literature I (5-0-5) 

Alternate quarters. 

A study of the major works of English literature from its beginnings to the end of the 

18th century. Includes the Beowulf poet, Chaucer, Spenser and Milton. 

ENG 312 Survey of English Literature II (5-0-5) 

Alternate quarters. 

A study of major works from the beginning of the 19th century to the contemporary 

period. Includes the Romantics, the Victorians and the Moderns. 

ENG 313 World Literature I (5-0-5) 

A study of major works and movements in world literature through the Renaissance. 

ENG 314 World Literature II (5-0-5) 

A study of major works and movements in modern world literature. 

ENG 315 Survey of American Literature I (5-0-5) 

A study of American literature from its beginnings to 1865, with emphasis on 
historical, philosophical, and cultural contexts. 

ENG 316 Survey of American Literature II (5-0-5) 

A study of American literature from 1865 to the present, with emphasis on historical, 
philosophical, and cultural contexts. 

ENG 372 Technical and Business Communication (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. 

Students learn to report technical information clearly and persuasively. Assign- 
ments include technical descriptions and instructions, memoranda, business letters, 
reports, and research articles. Emphasizes writing and includes oral presentations 
using visual aids. 

ENG 436 The American Novel (5-0-5) 

A study of the American novel as a distinctive literary form. 

ENG 437 American Poetry (5-0-5) 

A study of American poetry in the context of technological developments, philo- 
sophical movements, and literary currents. 

ENG 438 Southern Literature (5-0-5) 

A study of Southern literature in its distinctive social and aesthetic contexts. 

ENG 441 Early English Literature, Beginnings through 1603 (5-0-5) 

Surveys major English literature from its beginning to the 15th century. Emphasis 
is on the development of a literature that reflects the diversified England of this 800- 
year period. Writers include: the Beowulf poet and other Old English authors, early 
Middle English lyrics and the major figures of the 14th century (the Pearl Poet, 
Chaucer, Langland, Gower). 

ENG 445 Shakespeare I (5-0-5) 

Fall or Spring. 

A comprehensive study of the tragedies, comedies, and history plays drawn from 
Taming of the Shrew, Merchant of Venice, Merry Wives of Windsor, Much Ado Abozvt 
Nothing, As You Like It, Troilus and Cressida, Measure for Measure, Richard II, Henry IV 
Parts 1 and 2, Henry V, Titus Andronicus, Julius Caesar, King Lear, Macbeth, Antony and 
Cleopatra, and Coriolanus. 

ENG 446 Shakespeare II (5-0-5) 

Spring or Fall. 

A second comprehensive study of the tragedies, comedies and history plays drawn 
from A Comedy of Errors, Love's Labor's Lost, Romeo and Juliet, Midsummer Night's 
Dream, Twelfth Night, Hamlet, Othello, A Winter's Tale, The Tempest, Pericles, 
Cymbeline, All's Well That Ends Well, Two Gentlemen of Verona, King John, Timon 
of Athens, Richard III, Henry VI, and Henry VIII. 



LANGUAGES, LITERATURE, AND DRAMATIC ARTS 



I7lh i tntuq British Poetr) and Piom 160 I 1669 (5-0 I) 

Vlternati 

\ wrve) ol tin- majoi non dramatic literature from the 

n oi W illiam and Mar) this com 
metaphysical and classical traditions in I nglish \ 
|onson Herbert Herrick Craaha* Vaughan Marvell, Milton 
Mum arv l hydeiv md Roc hestei 
L8th i entuij British Poetr) and Prose (5-0-5) 
ing 

irvej ol British pott r \ and prose from 1690 to 1784, tins . juaints 

students with tin- philosophic and aesthetic concerns ol the a hiefl) 

but not exclusively in the works ol s witt, Pope, lohnson, and I iel 

19th ( entarj I: British Romantic Poetry and Piom (5-0-5) 

Alternates with ENG 15 

An examination ol tin- works ol tin- major Romantic writers including Blake, 

\\ ordsworth, Coleridge, In ion. Shelle) , and Keats. 

19th Centuiy II: British Victorian I'oetry and Prose (5-0-5) 

AJtemates with ENG J52. 

An examination ol tin- responses oi novelists, poets, and pros*.- writers to tin- lssm-s 

troubling Victorian England: tin- conflict between science and religion, tin- faith in 

'progress," the growth ol industrialism, tin- rights ol the individual and ol tin- 

societ) . and the role ol tin- artist. 

British Drama I: Beginnings to 1630 (5-0-5) 

AJtemates with 1 NG 157 and J65. 

Medieval and Renaissance Non-Shakespearean drama; stresses the pla) sot Marlowe, 

[orison, Beaumont and Fletcher, Middleton ^ud Webster; and grounds tin- student 

in the conventions and traditions of Medieval and early [udor drama. 

British Drama II: 1630-1800 (5-0-5) 

Alternates with English 356 ^^nd 365. 

Restoration and Eighteenth Century Drama; begins with Pre-Restoration, late 

Caroline drama; and stresses the plays of Ford, Shirley, Drvden. lee. Otway, 

Etherege, Wycherlej , Congreve, Goldsmith, and Sheridan. 

Ancient Epic and Drama (5-0-5) 

Spring. .Alternate \ ears. 

A study of major works of antiquity. .Authors include Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, 

Euripides, and other significant figures. 

Modernism (5-0-5) 

A study of major British and American fiction and poetry of the early twentieth 
century in the context of continental developments. W titers may include Conrad, 
Proust, Joyce, Woolf, Yeats, Eliot, ^nd Faulkner. 

Contemporary Literature (5-0-5) 

A Study of fiction or poetry (or both) since World War II as it relates to literary 

traditions and cultural movements, ropics may include the following: postmodernist 

fiction, ethnic writers, and confessional poetry. 

British, American, and Continental Drama: Ibsen to the Present (5-0-5) 
Alternates with ENG 356 and 

A survey oi Nth and 20th century British, American and European plays. Move- 
ments include Realism, the Irish Renaissance. Expressionism, Impressionism, and 
Theater of the Absurd. Ibsen, Shaw A eats,0'Casey, Wilde, Strindberg, O'Neill, and 
Williams are among the dramatists studied. 

Advanced Composition (5-0-5) 

I he study of expository and argumentative techniques. 

ENG/DRS 473 Rhetoric (5-0-5) 

An introduction to the studv oi rhetoric, from Aristotle to the present, with 
emphasis on rhetorical analyses oi literature and other forms oi discourse. 



152 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



ENG 474 Creative Writing (Poetry) (5-0-5) 

Students submit poems which they then critique by written statement and by class 
discussion under the guidance of the professor. The professor supplements this 
workshop method with a relevant textbook. Students wishing to take the course 
should submit a writing sample to the professor for an initial screening. 

ENG 475 Creative Writing (Fiction) (5-0-5) 

Students submit stories which they then critique by written statement and by class 
discussion under the guidance of the professor. The professor supplements this 
workshop method with a relevant textbook. Students wishing to take the course 
should submit a writing sample to the professor for an initial screening. 

ENG/LIN 480 Advanced Grammar (5-0-5) 

A study of current approaches to grammar (including generative transforma- 
tional); phonology, morphology and syntax are studied. 

ENG/LIN 482 History of English Language (5-0-5) 

A study of the English language from its beginnings in the fifth and sixth centuries 
to its worldwide expansion in the 20th. Traces the language chronologically from Old 
to Middle to Modern English. Emphasis is on the phonetic, syntactic, and lexical 
changes with weight given both to internal and external influences. 

ENG 490 Independent Study (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Prerequisites: Senior status or department head's approval. Available to transient 
students under the following conditions: approval of the Dean of the faculty and Dean 
of the college from which the student comes. 

ENG 491 Independent Study (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Prerequisites: Senior status or department head's approval. Available to transient 
students under the following conditions; approval of the Dean of the Faculty and Dean 
of the college from which the student comes. 

ENG 499 Internship (up to 15 hrs) 

Offered by Special arrangement. Prerequisite: Junior status, a 2.5 GPA, a supervisory 
staff member, recommendation of the departmental internship Committee, and 
approval of the Department head. May be repeated to a maximum of 15 credit hours. 
The student pursues an individually designed project involving off-campus work, 
study, and /or research. Projects are under the joint supervision of the sponsoring 
institution and the staff member. Fifteen hours credit requires forty hours a week at 
the sponsoring institution. Ten hours credit requires twenty-five hours a week; five 
hours credit requires fifteen hours a week. 

ENG 500 Special Topic (5-0-5) 

Subject is announced when the course is offered. Subjects include: Modernism: 1 880-1 940, 
Apartheid in Perspective; World-wide English Literature, Decadence, Women in 
Literature. 

ENG 501 Special Genre (5-0-5) 

Subject is announced when the course is offered. Genres include: New England Poets, 
Victorian Novel, Eighteenth Century Novel, Russian Novel, Southern Fiction, 
British Drama, Short Story. 

ENG 502 Special Author (5-0-5) 

Subject is announced when the course is offered. Authors include: Faulkner, Joyce, 
Dickens, Twain, Hardy, Fielding, Chaucer, Milton, Dante, Frost, Dickinson, Austen, 
and Flannery O'Connor. 

Film Offerings 

FLM/DRS 340 Development of the Cinema (5-0-5) 

Winter. 

A study of the history and development of the cinema with special emphasis on the 

American dominance of the medium. 

FLM/DRS 349 Television Theory and Criticism (5-0-5) 

See DRS/FLM 349 for course description. 



L ANGUAGES, LITERATURE, AND DRAMATIC ARTS 153 



II \l DRS 150 I ih" .«s in \n (5-0 I) 
N 
Stud) ol film with emphasis an critical 

n\! DRS 151 Film ind 1 Iterature (5-0 

Studies in the translation of literature to film with emphasis on the dif fen 
media in form content and perception 

II \i DRS 101 ropica In I ilm (5-0-5) 
Prerequisite 1 1 \i 

w\ subje< t mattei isannouru ed ia hen thecoui 
auteurs and ( riti< al theor) 

Foreign Language Offerings 

Prerequisite for all foreign languages liU and Spanish 105 is eligibility for I nglish H'l 

PR] 101/ 
2/103 Elemental! French One, Inn, I hrec (5-0-5) 

Offered each \ ear 

Pirn ides the student with theelementsot I rench grammar, pronuiu iation, and oral 
comprehension, together with an introduction to the < ulture and « ivilization ol the 
French-speaking world . Regular practice with tape recordings is required No foreign 
language background is necessar) to begin 101. 

IE 201 [ntermediate French (5-0-5) 

Offered each year. Prerequisite: I hree quarters of college French or permission ol 

instructor 

c ontinues to develop reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. 
[\ 210 French Conversation and Compositon I (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: FRE201 or equivalent. 

Emphasis is on conversational French in simulated situations to develop greater 
oral proficienc) .\nd to promote continued awareness of the French speaking 
culture. Students will review grammar and syntax through guided essays to 
de\ elop writing skills m the contact language. Classes will be conducted entirely in 

French. 

LE 211 French Conversation and Composition II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: FRE 210. 
I he continuation of French 210. 

IE 300 Advanced Grammar and Syntax (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: FRF 211 or equivalent. 

Advanced analysis and examination of the grammar <.md syntax of the French, 
stressing oral usage through written grammar exercises. Classes conducted in 
French. 

LE 310 French Civilization I (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: French 211 or equivalent. 

Survey of the culture and civilization of France. Areas of Study include history, 

geography, politics, the arts, and daily life from the middle ages to the Revolution. 
Classes will be conducted entirely in French. 

IE 311 French Civilization II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: French 21 1 or equivalent. 

Continuation of French 310. The analysis of contemporary French society: geogra- 
phy, sociology, art, and science since 1799 (the French Revolution). This course will 

also survey the cultures of Other French-speaking countries. Classes will be con- 
ducted entirely in French. 

LE 320 Special Topics In French Literature (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: FRE 300. 

Subject matter is announced when the course is tittered. Includes: sur\ ■ 

Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century literature. Classes conducted in French. 



154 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



FRE 351/ 
352/353 



FRE 401 



FRE 402 



FRE 490 



FRE 499 






GER 101/ 
102/103 



GER 201 



GER 300 



GER 305 



GER 351/ 

352/353 



Study Abroad in France (V-V-15) 

Prerequisite: FRE 103. 

A summer quarter's residence and study in France in conjunction with the Studies 
Abroad Program of the University System of Georgia. The program lasts for a 
period of 8-9 weeks. The student receives intensive instruction in language and 
culture and participates in University-sponsored activities. 

Special Genre (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: FRE 320 or permission of instructor. 

Subject matter is announced when the course is offered. Subjects include: Seven- 
teenth, Eighteenth, Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century Fiction and Theatre. Classes 
conducted in French. 

Special Author (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: FRE 320 or permission of instructor. 

Subject matter is announced when the course is offered. Authors include: Flaubert, 

Hugo, Zola, Malraux, Camus. 

Independent Study (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Prerequisites: FRE 320 or approval of instructor. 

Transient students may take this course only with permission of the Dean of Faculty 

at Armstrong and the college from which the student comes. 

Language Internship (0-6-3) 

Offered by special arrangement. 

Prerequisites: Junior status, a minimum 2.75 overall G.P.A., a 3.0 G.P.A. in French, 
recommendation of the department head and an instructor of French. 
The student pursues an individually designed project involving off-campus in- 
struction at the elementary school level (grades 1-6). Each week the student will 
prepare for five hours to teach a one hour class. A supervisor from the sponsoring 
institution and an instructor of French will coordinate instruction with the class- 
room teacher and the intern. The ASC instructor will observe the student's class 
twice quarterly and evaluate the teaching. 

Elementary German One, Two, Three (5-0-5) 

Offered each year. 

Provide the student with the elements of German grammar, pronunciation, and 
oral comprehension, together with an introduction to the culture and civilization of 
the German-speaking world. Regular practice with tape recordings is required. No 
foreign language background is necessary to begin 101. 

Intermediate German (5-0-5) 

Offered each year. Prerequisite: Three quarters of college German or permission of 

instructor. 

Continues to develop reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. 

Special Topic In the German Language (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: GER 201. 

Readings in the various uses of German, from the popular to the literary, throughout 

the history of the language. 

Special Topics In German Literature (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: GER 201. 

Subject matter is announced when the course is offered. Topics include: surveys of 

Eighteenth, Nineteenth, and Twentieth Century German literature. 

Study Abroad In Germany (V-V15) 

Prerequisite: GER 103. 

An 8-9 week summer quarter's residence and study at the Friedrich Alexandar 
University at Erlangen, Germany. An IISP program operating in conjunction with 
the University of Georgia: offers intensive instruction in the German language and 
culture, complemented by a number of excursions. 



LANGUAGES. LITERATURE, AND DRAMATIC ARTS 



155 



Spti i.ii i ienrc (5-0-5) 

equisite ( •! R K)5 or permission of instructed 
Subje< t is announced * fu-n the course is offered Subjects include Medieval P 

Poetr) .imvI Drams in the 17th and 18th ( entury; the \<>v.-ii.i m the 19th 
t. entur\ 20thl entur\ I'u'm' 

Sped*] tuthoi (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite ^ •! R (05 or permission of instructoi 

Subje< t is announced when the course is offered Authors include: Grimm* 

Goethe Schillei rhomasMann Kafka, Gi 

lndfpiMulc.it Study (1-5MM1-5) 

Prerequisite Appro\ si oi instnu toi or ( >l R - l) i l ransient students ma) tak«- tins 

courseonly with permission of the 1 teanol Faculty al Armstrong and the < ollege f rom 

w huh the student >. omes 

I lementarv 1 atin One, Two, Three (5-0-5) 

I hree courses offered each year. 

1 ssentials o( grammar; readings from selected I atin authors 

Intermediate latin (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: I hree quarters of college Latin or three j ears oi high s< hool I atin 

Further readings in I atin literature with Bpe< ial emphasis on Vergil and ( h id, 

Readings In I atin (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: I A I 201 

Readings from the 2,000 years of I atinit) from Plautus to the recent encyclicals. 

Readings In Latin II (5-0-5) 

Readings oi Latin poetry; may include Horace, Catullus, Ovid, Propertius, and 

I ihulluv 

Ovid (5-0-5) 
Prerequisite:! \1 201. 

Readings from the Metamorphoses, with emphasis on familiar mythology/ and from 
other selected works. 

Studv Abroad In Rome and Athens (V-V-15) 

Prerequisite: LAT 103. 

An s - u week summer quarter's residence and Study in Rome >.\nd Athens m 
conjunction with the Studies Abroad Program of the University System of Georgia. 
Taught in English. Through visits to monuments, museums, and classical ruins, 
and on excursions to Crete, Delphi, Ostia, Tivoli, Tarquinia, and Frascati, the 
student experiences first hand the reality of life in the ancient world. 

Latin Language and Culture In Rome (15-0-15) 

summer. Prerequisite: LAT 201 or the equivalent. 

Classes meet in Rome for 3 hours a day, 6 days a week, for 7 weeks, to speak, read, 
and hear 1 atin. Students practice composition outside of class and travel to places 
of cultural significance. 

Vergil (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: LAT 201, permission of pr of essor 

Readings from the Aeneid, with emphasis on books II, IV, VI, and VIII, and from 
other selected works. 



Elementary Spanish One-Two-Three (5-0-5) 

Ottered each year. 

Provide the student with the elements of Spanish grammar, pronunciation, and oral 
comprehension, together with an introduction to the culture and civilization oi the 
spanish-speaking world. Regular practice with tape recordings is required . No foreign 
language background is necessary to begin 101. 



156 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



SPA 105 Spanish for Survival in Health Care Delivery Systems (5-0-5) 

A one-quarter designed for the student who has had little or no formal study of 
Spanish. The purpose of the course is to provide the student with the most basic 
communications skills in the language so that he/she might be able to deal with 
non-English speaking patients in a wide variety of clinical situations. This course 
will fulfill the CPC requirement in foreign languages. 

SPA 201 Intermediate Spanish (5-0-5) 

Offered each year. Prerequisite: Three quarters of college Spanish or permission of 

instructor. 

Continues to develop reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. 

SPA 210 Spanish Conversation and Composition I (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SPA 201 or equivalent. 

Emphasis is on conversational Spanish in simulated situations to develop greater 
oral proficiency and to promote continued awareness of Hispanic culture. Review 
of grammar and syntax through guided essays to develop writing skills in the 
contact language. Classes will be conducted entirely in Spanish. 

SPA 211 Spanish Conversation and Composition II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SPA 210. 

The continuation of Spanish 210. 

SPA 301 Advanced Grammar and Syntax (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 211 or equivalent. 

Advanced analysis and examination of the grammar and syntax of Spanish, stressing 
written usage through written grammar exercises, essays and translations of English 
texts into Spanish. Class will be conducted entirely in Spanish. 

SPA 302 Advanced Grammar and Syntax for Native Speakers 

of Spanish (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Advanced analvsis and examination of the grammar and syntax of Spanish for the 
native speakers of Spanish, stressing written usage through written grammar 
exercises and essays. Class will be conducted entirely in Spanish. 

SPA 310 Civilization and Culture of Spain I (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 211 or equivalent. 

An historical survey of the culture of Spain from the Pre-Roman era to the end of 

the Hapsburg Dynasty (1700). Classes will be conducted entirely in Spanish. 

SPA 311 Civilization and Culture of Spain II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 211 or equivalent. 

The continuation of Spanish 310. An historical survey of Modern Spain, from the 
establishment of the Bourbon Dynasty ( 1 700) to the present. Classes will be conducted 
entirely in Spanish. 

SPA 312 Civilization and Culture of Latin America (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Spanish 211 or equivalent. 

An historical survey of the culture of Latin America from the pre-Columbian era to 

the present day. Classes will be conducted entirely in Spanish. 

SPA 320 Introduction to Literature (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SPA 301 or equivalent. 

This course will provide the student with methods of analysis for approaching a 
literary text in Spanish. Selected pieces of poetry, prose and drama from the 
Hispanic tradition will be selected for analysis. Classes will be conducted entirely 
in Spanish. 

SPA 351/ 

352/353 Study Abroad In Spain (V-V-l-5) 

Prerequisite: SPA 103 and a 3.0 minimum G.P.A. in all Spanish course work. 
A 8-9 week summer quarter's residence and study at the Universidad de Salamanca 
in Salamanca, Spain. An I.I.S.P. program operating in conjunction with the Univer- 
sity System of Georgia, offers intensive instruction in languages and culture 
complemented by a number of excursions. 



LANGUAGES. LITERATURE, AND DRAMATIC ARTS 157 



sr \ mi Special Genre < i I) 

Prerequisite Spanish 120 >>i permission of the instn 
Hispanit I iterature Subject is announced when < 
condtM ted entirel) in Spanish 

SPA 102 Special tathoi (5-0 '*) 

Prerequisite Spanish 120 oi permission of instructoi 

Hispanu Literature Subject is announced when course is offered i lasses will be 

condu< ted entirel) in Spanish 

SPA 103 Special ropica I I 

Prerequisite Spanish J20 or permission ol instru< toi 

Hispanu I iterature Subject is announced when course is offered rhematk studies 
of 1 lispanit literar) topics, such as "1 he Anti-hero in Spanish I iterature" or "1 he 
1 heme oi the Dictator in I atin Ajnerican I iterature ( lasses will be conducted 
entirel) in Spanish 

SPA 404 Spanish Phonetics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite Spanish J01 or permission of instru< toi 

I his course will examine the phonological system ol the Spanish language. ( lasses 

will be conducted entirel) in Spanish 

SPA 490 Independent Stud) (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Prerequisites: Appro* a I of instructor and SPA 201 I ransient students ma) take this 
course onl) with the permission of the Deanol Faculty at Armstrong and the college 
from which the student comes. 

SPA 499 Language Internship (0-6-3) 

Offered b) special arrangement. Prerequisites: [unior status, a minimum 2.75 o* erall 
G.P \ a3.0G.P.A in Spanish, recommendation of the departmental internship 
committee, and approval of the department head and a Spanish faculty member, 
rhe student pursues an individually designed project mvolving off-campus instruction 
at the elementary school level (grades 1-6). Weekl) preparation of five hours 
towards a class instruction period of one hour is expected. Hie project is under 
supervision of the sponsoring institution and a Spanish faculty member who will 
coordinate it with the classroom teacher and the intern. I he supervisor in charge will 
evaluate by observation (twice quarterly) the quality of the intern's performance. 

Journalism Offerings 

JRN 343 Journalistic Writing and Editing (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: ENG201. 

Investigation of and intensive practice in the techniques of modern journalism with 

emphasis on writing and editing tor newspapers and magazines. 

JRN 347 Basic TV Production (2-9-5) 

Alternates with DRS 400, Spring, Fall. Same as DRS 347. 

A study of the theory and practice of television production styles, forms, m^\ 
concepts, with special emphasis on the critical appreciation of electronic commu- 
nication techniques. 

JRN 350 Film as an Art (5-0-5) 

Spring. Same as FLM/ DRS 350. 

Study of film with emphasis on critical appreciation of film as an art form. 

JRN 400 Topics In Journalism (5-0-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: JRN 340 or 343 or permission of instructor. 

A seminar on the impact or" the media on the world today. Topics include rights and 
responsibilities or journalists, censorship, media control, propaganda, and other 
current issues. 






158 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Linguistics Offerings 

LIN 470 Advanced Composition (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ENG 201 or consent of instructor. Same as ENG 370. 
A study of expository and report techniques. 

LIN 480 Advanced Grammar (5-0-5) 

Spring. Same as ENG/LIN 380. 

A study of current approaches to grammar (including generative transformational); 

phonology, morphology, and syntax will be studied. 

LIN 482 History of the English Language (5-0-5) 

Same as ENG/LIN 382. 

LIN 500 Topics In Linguistics (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: ENG/LIN 380 or 382 or permission of the instructor. 

A seminar in subjects of interest in both theoretical and applied linguistics. Topics 

are announced. The course may be taken more than once for credit as topics change. 

Philosophy Offerings 

Please Note: ENG 101 is prerequisite: to all following PHI courses. 

PHI 201 Introduction to Philosophy (5-0-5) 

An introduction to the basic themes, problems, vocabulary, and representative figures 
of philosophy. 

PHI 301 Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (5-0-5) 

An historical introduction to philosophy, tracing the development of European 
philosophy from the early Greeks through the Middle Ages, with emphasis on 
selected works of major philosophers. 

PHI 302 16th, 17th, 18th Century Philosophy (5-0-5) 

European philosophy from the Renaissance through Kant, emphasizing selected 
works of major philosophers. 

PHI 303 19th and 20th Century Philosophy (5-0-5) 

A study of the major philosophers and philosophical movements of the 1 9th and 20th 
centuries. 

PHI 400 Special Topics (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: PHI 201 or a 300 philosophy course. 
Subject is announced when the course is offered. Current courses: Aesthetics, Philoso- 
phy of Religion, Ethics, Nietzsche. 

PHI 490 Independent Study (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Senior status and one 300-philosophy course. 
The student, with the advice and consent of this supervising professor and of the 
department head, selects the topic for supervised independent study and submits a 
prospectus for department approval before the quarter in which the course is to be 
taken. Transient students may take this course only with permission of the Dean of 
Faculty at Armstrong and the college from which the student comes. 






MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 



Mathematics and Computer Science 

I .u lilt) 

1 w heelei I d i tepartment I lead 

* Barnard fane [odis, Stephen 

' Bykal Alex * Kilhefnei I lale 

I indeis fohn Matthews, Robert 

' l [ansen |ohn M< \l ill.m. I an 

\ loUis Selv* \ 11 Munson, Ri< hard 

I [orta, Axnaldo Shiplej , c harles 

' f [udson \niu % \\ Kite, l aurie 

1 [udson Sigmund 

' t, iraduate I acult) 

I he Mathematics and C omputei s «. ieru e I department offers a wide range of sen k es 
tome \ s «^ student. Several introductor) courses are available both to satisfy the general 
education needs ol the student and to satisfy prerequisites in the major program. A minor 
in cither mathematics or computer s< ien< e ( an be designed to complement tlu* rest o( a 
student b program. A major in the mathematical sciences allows the student to choose 

from among tour options; t i flexible computer science major meets the needs of students 

with .1 number of different interests. 

The Mathematical Sciences Malor: Option I of this major is entitled "Mathematics" 

and prepares students intending to pursue graduate studies in mathematics. ( )/>//<>/; ) is 
entitled Mathematics Education" and prepares students to teach in public and private 
secondary schools. I his option is an approved program for the Georgia teacher's 
Professional Four V ear Certificate 1 1 -4). c iption 4 is entitled "C omputer Science" and is 

available tor students who desire a dual concentration in mathematics and computer 
science. 

The most flexible of the tour options \s Option 2 entitled "Applied Mathematics." This 
option is a good choice tor students preparing tor a variety o\ careers in business and 
industry, intending to attend graduate school in a quantitative area such as biostatistu s, 
economics, or Operations research, or wishing to participate in a Dual-Degree Program 
in engineering. 

The Computer Science Major: In recent \ ears this major has equipped many students 
to step mto a broad spectrum of jobs m the computer industry. The degree features a core 
ot courses designed to provide a solid foundation in theoretical computer science as well 
as practical programming experience. After finishing the core, students choose from 
several optional senior level tracks that gi\ e an individual focus to the major. At present 
students may choose from tracks in large software system development computer 
s\ stems, knowledge-based systems, and scientific computation. A \ ariety oi internships 
and cooperative education placements pro\ ide students w ith opportunities tor practical 
experience in the discipline. 

Important Note: In August of 1991 the computer science major was accredited by the 
Computer Science Accreditation Commission (CSAC) making the Armstrong program 
the second accredited program in the state. (The first accredited program in the state is 
housed at Georgia Institute of Technology.) The Computer Science Accreditation Com- 
mission is an agent of the Computing Sciences Accreditation Board (CSAB), a specialized 
accrediting body recognized by the Council on Postsecondary Accreditation (COPA) and 
the U.S. Department of Education. 

Co-ops and Internships: Students in computer science are able to compete for 
cooperative education positions and internships at major Savannah employers such as 
Gulfstream and Savannah Foods. Such positions provide students invaluable opportu- 
nities to acquire practical experience that complements their classroom experience. 



160 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



The Dual Degree Program: Under arrangements with Georgia Tech, students may in 
five years of study earn simultaneously the BS degree in the mathematical sciences from 
Armstrong and the Bachelor's degree in any one of a number of fields of engineering from 
Georgia Tech. Armstrong participates in similar programs with other major universities. 
Students considering this option should contact an advisor in the Mathematics and 
Computer Science Department as soon as possible. 

Minors: Students in any major program whatever (either two year or four year) can 
augment their major with a minor in mathematics or a minor in computer science. 

Minor in Mathematics: 

1. MAT 207, 208, 216 

2. Ten additional quarter hours chosen from MAT 260, MAT 265, 300-400 level 
mathematics courses (excluding MAT 391 and MAT 393). MAT 260 and MAT 265 
may not both be included in the minor. 

Minor in Computer Science: 

1. CS242 

2. Four of CS 262 or 300-400 level courses (excluding CS 400, 496, 497) 

Special Academic Regulations: 

1. To earn the BS degree in the mathematical sciences or computer science, a 
student must successfully complete with a grade of C or better all mathematics 
and computer science courses required in the program of study. 

2. To fulfill the prerequisites for any mathematics or computer science course one 
must obtain a grade of "C" (or above) in each prerequisite course except 
Mathematics 101. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A 
MAJOR IN MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 ...5 
Area II 20 

1. MAT 103, 206 10 

2. One of the sequences: BIO 101, 102; CHE 128, 129 (required for 

dual degree students); PHY 217, 218 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192 10 

2. POS 113 and one course selected from: PSY 101 (required for 

math education option); SOC 201; ECO 201, 202; ANT 201 10 

Area IV 30 

1. CS142 5 

2. MAT 207, 208, 216, 260 20 

3. HIS 251 or 252 5 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 117 and 103 or 108 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Major Field Requirements 30 

Option One — Mathematics: 

1. MAT 309, 311, 401 

2. One of MAT 317, 402, or 416 

3. Additional approved electives in mathematics 



MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 101 



( >ptu>n I wo applied Mathematu b 
l \! \l 121 141 
I >neof( S 

Oneol \i \l HI \\7 401, 416 
\ Additional courses from M \i 109 11 ' 101,4 

Option rhree Mathematics Education 
I \l\l HI 

\\ \i 116 oi 470 

Additional approved mathematics ele< tives 
Option l our ^ omputer s ^ ience 

1 MAI *21 

Oneol \i.\l \22 t 141 
KM 

( i ourses Related to Major 

Option c me Mathematu s 

l. I anguage or approved computer science l* 1 

2 Vppnn ed electives from mathematics or related field 15 

Option I wo Applied Mathematics 

One of the follow ing sequences 

1. PI ^^ 217,218,219 w ith additional approved electn es in chemistry, 
plu bics, or engineering 



3 



\CA 211.212 and ECO 201,21". 



J \ppro\ ed computer sdence courses 

4. Appnw ed biology courses including BIO 370 or 480 

5. Approved chemistry courses 
Option rhree — Mathematics Education 

1. PS\ 201 orEDN201 

2. EDN200,335,441,EXC310 
Option Four — Computer Science 

1. CS 312 and approved electives in computer science 

D. Electives 40 

> Students in Options 1, 2, and 4 may choose any electives. Students in option 3 must 

use these hours to complete student teaching. 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A 
MAJOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Hours 
A. General Requirements 96 

V Area 1 20 
1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 1 5 

2. One course selected from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 103, 206 10 

2. One of the sequences: BIO 101, 102; CHE 128, 129; PHY 217, 218 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 292 10 

2. POS 113 and one of the courses: PSY 101; SOC 201; ECO 201, 202; 
ANT 201 10 

Area IV 30 

1. MAT 207, 265 10 

2. CS 142, 242, 262 15 

3. HIS 251 or 252 5 



162 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Area V 6 

1. PE 117 and 103 or 108 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Major Field Requirements 45 

1. CS 303, 304, 312, 326, 334, 342 30 

2. Three courses chosen from one of the following groups: 15 

a. Large Software System Development: CS 346, 434, 445, 461 

b. Computer Systems: CS 346, 421, 426, 445 

c. Knowledge-based Systems: CS 414, 461, 481 

d. Scientific Computation: CS 353, 414, 445, 481 

C. Related Field Requirements 30 

1. ENG372 5 

2. MAT 321 5 

3. One course from MAT 208, 216, 322, 346, 353 5 

4. A third quarter of laboratory science completing the sequence begun 
in Area 2: 5 

a) BOT 203 or ZOO 204 

b) CHE 211 or CHE 341 

c) PHY 219 

5. Two additional approved electives from scientific disciplines 10 

D. Electives 20 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 

OFFERINGS 

Mathematics Offerings 

nil' * 

MAT 101 College Algebra (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: A score of 380 on the mathematics 
portion of the SAT or a passing score on the College Placement Exam (CPE). Real 
and complex number arithmetic, polynomial and rational expressions, equations 
and inequalities, absolute value, functions and graphs, exponential and logarith- 
mic functions, systems of equations and matrices. 

Placement Recommendation: Some students who satisfy the prerequisites for MAT 
101 nonetheless need to reinforce their mathematical skills in a developmental 
studies mathematics course before taking MAT 101. In particular if any of the 
following is true, the student should consider enrolling in DSM 98 or 99: 

a) The student did not complete two years of algebra and one year of geometry in 
high school. 

b) The student has not completed a mathematics course in five or more years. 

c) The student made below 420 on the mathematics portion of the SAT examination. 

MAT 103 Pre-Calculus Mathematics (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: MAT 101, a score of at least 550 on the 
mathematics portion of the SAT, or permission of the department head. 
Functions: polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and in- 
verse trigonometric; trigonometric identities; law of sines and cosines; complex 
numbers. 

MAT 195 Applied Mathematics for Business and Social Sciences (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 101. 

An applied mathematics course featuring applications in economics and the social 
sciences. Linear functions and models; matrix operations and applications; in- 
equalities and linear programming; exponential functions and log functions; single 
and multivariant differentiation. 



MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCI* N(.l 



163 






\i \ I 206 ( alcului I • I 0-5) 

Kill Wintei Spring Summei Prerequisite \1 \ I inthe 

in.it lu-m.itu » portion ol theSAI oi permission oi the department head 
Functions ilu- derivative tnd Its applications antidifferentiation; tl 
integral 

MAI 207 c ilcului ll (5-0-5) 

Kill Wintei Spring Summei Prerequisite \1 \ I . 

fa hniques and applications ol integration; n>iu> nd polar a 

MAI 208 < ilcaltu of Seven! \ triable! I (WK Q 

l .ill Wintei Spring Prerequisite M \ I . 

Parametric curves and vectors in the plane; indeterminate forma rayloi i formula, 

and improper integrals; infinite series; vectors/ curves, and surfaces in space partial 

differentiation 
\1 \I 216 I inear \lgebra (5-0-5) 

Prere q uisite M \ I 207. 

I inear systems and matrices vector spaces; linear independent e, rank of a matrix; 

linear transfbnnao'ons; determinants; introduction toeigem aluesandeigem • 

diagonalizan'on; applications 
MAI 220 Elemental} statistics (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: MA I li)l . 

Measures of central tendency and dispersion; probability distributions, inferefM es 

concerning moans; analysis oi variance; correlation; linear regression. 

MAT 260 Introduction to Mathematical Proof (5-0-5) 

Winter. Prerequisites: MA 1 207 

Elementary logic, sets, functions and relations, methods ot proof including induc- 
tion, and selected topics from abstract algebra. 

MAT 265 Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 103 and CS 142. 

Elementary logic; naive set theory; relations and functions; graphs; finite automata; 

Turing machines; formal languages and grammars. 

MAT 290 The Spirit and Structure of Mathematics (5-0-5) 
Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: MAI 101. 

A terminal course of selected topics designed to portray the history, philosophy, and 
aesthetics of mathematics, and to develop an appreciation of the role of mathematics 
in western thought and contemporary culture. 

MAT 309 Calculus of Several Variables II (5-0-5) 
Fall, Spring. Prerequisite: MAT 208. 

Multiple integrals and their applications; vector fields; line and surface integrals. 
Green's theorem; the Divergence theorem; Stokes theorem; differential equations. 

MAT 311 Abstract Algebra (5-0-5) 
Prerequisites: MAT 208, 260. 

Elementary properties of integers; groups, rings, and fields; mappings, homomor- 
phisms, kernels, and quotient structures. 

MAT 317 Advanced Linear Algebra (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 216, MAT 260. 

Abstract \ector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvectorsand eigenvalues, diago- 
nalization, inner product spaces, real quadratic forms. 

MAT 321 Probability & Mathematical Statistics (5-0-5) 
Prerequisites: MAT 207. MAT 260 or MAT 265. 

Data collection, organization, and description; probability; random variables; 
discrete and continuous probabilitv distributions; Central Limit Theorem; point and 
interval estimation; tests of hypotheses; simple linear regression and correlation. 

MAT 322 Probability & Mathematical Statistics II (5-0-5) 
Prerequisite: MAT 321. 

Analysis of variance; nonlinear and multiple regression; chi-square tests for cat- 
egorical data; nonparametric methods; Bayesian inference. This course uses statistical 
packages to analyze data sets. 



164 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



MAT 336 
MAT 341/342 



MAT 346 



MAT 353 



MAT 360 



MAT 391 



:2 
pi 



MAT 393 



MAT 400 



MAT 401/402 



Modern Geometry (5-0-5) 

Fall (odd years). Prerequisites: MAT 208, 260. 
A survey of topics from Euclidean geometry. 

Differential Equations I, II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 208. 

Ordinary differential equations; series solutions; systems of first order differential 
equations, the Laplace transform; introduction to Fourier series; partial differential 
equations; Sturm-Liouville theory; applied problems; numerical solutions with 
emphasis on computer aided solution. 

Mathematical Modeling and Optimization (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 321 . 

Design, solution, and interpretation of mathematical models of problems in the social, 
life, and management sciences. Topics chosen from linear programming, dynamic 
programming, scheduling theory, Markov chains, game theory, queuing theory, 
inventory theory, and computer based simulation. Various projects are assigned 
which require computer software packages for solution. 

Numerical Analysis (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 207 and CS 120 or 142. 

Numerical error; polynomial interpolation; systems of linear equations; numerical 
integration and numerical solution of differential equations; matrix inversion; 
evaluation of determinants; calculation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors; boundary 
value problems. 

Mathematical Logic (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 207, 260. 

The elementary statement and predicate calculus; formal systems; applications of 

logic in mathematics. 

Mathematics for the Elementary School Teacher (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 101, 103 or 290 with a grade of "C" or better, and admission to 
Teacher Education. 

A study of the mathematics in the K-6 curriculum, with emphasis on appropriate 
methods of teaching for understanding through activity based and problem solving 
experiences. Communication and connections will be emphasized. Frequent use of 
wide range of concrete manipulatives to embody concepts in arithmetic and whole 
numbers, fractions and decimals, and in geometry and measurement. Directed field 
experience and required laboratory. (Credit will not apply toward a degree in the 
mathematical sciences.) 

Teaching of Middle School/ General Mathematics (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 391. 

Problems of teaching traditional topics such as fractions, decimals, percentage, 
measurement (especially the metric system), informal geometry, algebraic struc- 
tures, probability, and statistics. Cooperative learning in an activity-based, problem 
solving environment will be emphasized. Incorporation of drill and practice in 
necessary skills with appropriate games and laboratory exercises. Directed field 
experience and required laboratory. (Credit will not apply toward a degree in the 
mathematical sciences.) 

Putnam Seminar (0-2-1) 

Fall. Prerequisites: MAT 208, 260. 

A variety of mathematical problems, considered with the aim of developing 

problem solving techniques. 

Advanced Calculus I, II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT 208, 260. 

The real number system; sequences; limits of functions; the Bolzano-Weierstrass 
theorem; compactness; uniform continuity; the derivative; the Riemann integral; 
Euclidean n-space; sequences of functions; the Weierstrass approximation theorem; 
series; elementary functions. 



MATHEMATICS 



165 



\1 \l 10r> 



\i \1 136 



\1 \l ro 



M \ I 490 



MAT 4%/ 
497 498 



I uiu tums o\ .i ( omplca N -if table I - 
Prerequisites \l \ I 208 260 
c omplex numbers element* r) functions and transform 
con forma I mapping Riemann s mapping thr • 



• n-m 



\i \ i 116 rheon of Numben (5-0-5) 



!60 
Divisibility .mvi congruence diophanrine equations distribution «>t prime num 

famous unsold ed problems; numbei theoretic functions and their applica I 
rheorems of Fermat and I uler;quadrati< reciprocit) selected topics fron 
m\A anal) tic numbei tlu-<>i\ 

I opolog] I &-0- ;i 

Prerequisite \1 \ I 401 

topological spaces and homeomorphisms; separability ;< ompat tness;< onne tedness; 

completeness; metrizabilit) . introdu< tion to homotop) theor) 

Historj of Mathematics (5-0-5) 

Prere q uisites \l \ l 208 and six quarter hours of mathematu s i ourses with i ourse 

numbers greater than 509 

A survey of tin- development of mathematics from its empirical beginnings to its 

present state. 

Special topics (1-5MM1-5) 

Offered by special arrangement. Prerequisites: ( onsentof the instructor and permis- 
sion of the department head. 

Indh idual readings and research under the direction of a memberof the mathematics 
faculty. 

Internship In Mathematics ((0-l)-(12-15)-5) 

Offered by special arrangement. Prerequisite: Permission of the department head. 
Experience! in a \ ariety of mathematical applications suited to the educational and 
professional aspirations of the student, under the direction of the faculty m^] 
appropriate off-campus supervisory personnel. (Open to transient students only with 
permission of the Dean of Faculty at Armstrong and that of the appropriate official 
of the college from which the student comes, i 



Computer Science Offerings 



CS115 



CS116 



CS120 



Introduction to Computer Concepts and Applications (4-3-5) 
Fall, Winter, Spring. Summer. Prerequisite: MAI 101. 

rhe study of hardware and software components of computers, elementary program- 
mini;, and the impact of the computer on society. Discussion ot the capabilities and 

the limitations of computers, and the kinds of problems that are best solved by 
computers. Experience with developing and modifying algorithms to solve such 
problems. Emphasis tm the major uses ot computers. I his course is designed tor the non- 
computer science major. It may not be applied as part of a language sequence. Credit 
will be granted tor only one of CS 115, CS 116, and CS29 

Honors Computer Concepts and Applications (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite or Corequisite: MA 1 103. 

I his course replaces CS 1 15 for selected students. While the subject matter will be 
similar to the subject matter in CS 1 15, the treatment will have greater depth due to 
the higher mathematical experience oi the students. Mathematical software pack- 
ages will be included in the laboratory component. Credit will be granted for only 
one oi CS 113, CS 1 16, and CS 296. 

Introduction to BASIC Programming (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 101. 

BASIC programming and program structure; elementary logic and Boolean algebra; 
algorithms; flow charts; debugging; computer solutions of numeric and non-numeric 
problems; characteristics and applications of computers in modern society. (Credit 
will not apply toward a degree in computer science.) 



166 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 






CS 136 RPG Programming (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CS 120 or 142. 

Introduction to the language and programming applications for small computer 

systems using RPG. 

CS 142 Introduction to Programming Principles with Pascal (4-3-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: MAT 101. 

Structured programming; the Pascal programming language; basic syntax, input/ 

output, debugging, functions and procedures, fundamental data types. 

CS 225 Statistical Programming for the Social Sciences (3-4-5) 

Winter (odd years). Prerequisites: MAT 220 or 321 and CS 120 or 142. 

Uses of computers in statistical analysis, including the study of statistical methods, 

the programming of statistical analyses, and data analysis using packaged systems. 

CS 242 Advanced Programming Principles with Pascal (4-3-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisites: MAT 103 and CS 142. 

Advanced programming concepts in Pascal: recursion, variant records, record- 
oriented input-output and dynamic structures associated with pointers such as 
linked lists, queues, stacks and trees. 

CS246 Fortran Programming (2-3-3) 

Prerequisites: MAT 103 and CS 120 or CS 142. 

Algorithmic processes of computer problem solving in a scientific context; FORTRAN 

programming language: syntax, arrays, input-output, subroutines, functions. 

CS 247 Programming Principles with COBOL (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CS 142. 

The COBOL programming language: basic syntax, input-output, debugging, table- 
handling, sorting, searching, sequential and random file manipulation, structured 
programming for COBOL. 

CS 262 Introduction to File Structures (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CS 242. 
py< An introduction to the concepts and techniques of accessing data in files on 

secondary devices. Includes sequential, relative, and indexed access methods, and 
tree-structured organizations. Also includes security and ethics, introductory and 
relational database system concepts, and external sorting. 

CS 296 Computer Literacy for Educators (2-3-3) 

Winter. Prerequisites: MAT 101. 

The study of hardware and software components of computers, elementary pro- 
gramming, and the impact of computers on curriculum. Discussion of the capabilities 
and limitations of computers, and the kinds of problems that are best solved by 
computers. Experience with developing and modifying algorithms to solve such 
problems. Emphasis on instructional uses of microcomputers. This course is 
designed for the non-computer science major. It may not be applied as part of a 
language sequence. Credit will be granted for only one of CS 115, CS 116, and 
CS 296. 

CS 303 Computer Organization and Architecture I (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CS 242. 

Hardware and software concepts of digital computing systems, with emphasis on 
fundamental system software and details of hardware operation. Topics include 
virtual machines, systems organization, digital logic, and microprogramming. 

CS 304 Computer Organization and Architecture II (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CS 303. 

Continuation of CS 303. Topics include instruction and data formats, addressing 

modes, instruction types, flow of control, assembly language programming, 

and advanced computer architectures, including RISC machines and parallel 

architectures. 



i 






MATHEMATICS 167 



CS3U Mgorithmi and Data Structure* [4 I \) 

Prerequisite! nd M \ I ' 

M'nIi.u t data ! rithms for the manipulatii 

•rithms concepts related to the interaction betwi 
structures for the generating developing ami pro 
memor) management 

{ § - Operating Systems i (5-0-5) 

^requisite I 
( oncepts structure and me< nanisms ol operating systems fopics includi 

tncurrency, memor) management scheduling, I O ma 
scheduling and file management 

i S 134 Software I ngineering c oncepts I 1 1 

requisites ( S262 and I v 

Principles and techniques ol designing and implementing software systems, in- 
cluding s\ stem life-< \ ». le models, planning techniques! requi r eme n ts anal) sis and 
systems specification, Kman interfaces, design, implementation, testing, mainte- 
nance, team structure and project management I lu- role and responsibilities ol 
computing professionals. A student project encompassing some or all of these 
techniques will be required. 

c S >42 Comparative I anguagea (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: e S 504 and MA l 2i 

Comparand e stud) ol programming languages including fa< ihties tor procedures, 
parameter passing and recursion, control structures, and storage allocation tech- 
niques. Methods ol specifying syntax and semantics. Introduction to program 
translation. 

CS 34b C Programming under UNIX (tm) (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CS J42. 

I hi- V programming language: basic syntax, types, operators and expressions, 
statements, modular programming, anays / stnictures # unions and pointers. UNDC(tm) 
s\ stem programming techniques: I O forking, pipes, signals, interrupts. Software 
tools: macros, conditional compilation, passing values to the compiler, Imt, symbolic 
debugging, source code control, libraries. 

CS353 Numerical Analysis (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: MAT207andCS 142. 

Numerical error; polynomial interpolation; systems of linear equations, numerical 
integration mu\ numerical solution o\ differentia] equations; matrix inversion; 
evaluation of determinants; calculation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors; boundary 
value problems. 

CS 400 Programming Seminar (0-2-1) 

Fall. Prerequisite; CS 242. 

A \ a r let v of programming problems, considered with the aim of developing problem 

soh ing techniques. 

Computer Graphics (4-3-5) 
Prerequisite: CS 312. 

Introduction to comp ute r gr a phics: hardware and software. Algorithms for computer 
graphics programming. Windows, clipping, two and three dimensional transforma- 
tions, hidden line and hidden surface removal. Graphics standards for hardware and 
software systems. 

Data Communications and Computer Networks (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: CS 304 

Communications media; codes; data transmission; multiplexing; protocols; lay- 
ered networks. 

Operating System Concepts II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: CS 326 and an elementary knowledge of 'C. 
Case studies of UNIX and/or similar operating systems. 



168 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



CS 434 Software Engineering Concepts II (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CS 334. 

Advanced software engineering principles, including software processes and 
methodologies, CASE tools, software metrics, software quality assurance, reusabil- 
ity and reengineering, and future trends. A student project encompassing some or 
all of these techniques will be required. 

CS 445 Compiler Theory (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: CS 31 2, 342. 

Study of programming language translation and basic compiler implementation 
techniques. Formal grammars and languages; specification of syntax and seman- 
tics; lexical analysis; parsing; semantic processing. 

CS 461 Database Systems (4-3-5) 

Prerequisite: CS 334. 

Database management system concepts and architecture; the relational, hierarchi- 
cal, network, entity-relationship, and other models; design concepts; internal 
implementation techniques. 

CS 481 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: CS 342. 

The basic concepts of artificial intelligence including production systems, knowl- 
edge representation, pattern matching, heuristic search, logical and probabilistic 
reasoning, and expert systems. The social, cultural, and economic impact of 
artificial intelligence. 

CS 490 Special Topics In Computer Science ((0-5)-(0-15)-(l-5)) 

Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor and permission of the department head. 
Selected topics in some area of current interest in computer science; possible areas 
include system simulation, graphics, and microcomputers. 

CS 496/ 

497/498 Internship In Computer Science ((0-l)-(12-15)-(l-5) 

Offered by special arrangement. Prerequisite: Permission of the department head. 
May not be taken concurrently. 

Experience, in a variety of computing environments suited to the educational and 
professional aspirations of the student, under the direction of a member of the faculty 
and appropriate off-campus supervisory personnel. 

Social and Behavioral Sciences 

Faculty 

* Martin, Grace, Head 

McCormick, Cynthia, Coordinator of Psychology 

* Adams, Joseph * Palefsky, Elliot 
Douglass, Keith Saadatmand, Yassaman 
Khondker, Karim Taylor, Stephen 
Kingery, Dorothy Walker, Deborah 

* Lane, Joseph 

* Graduate Faculty 

Students are advised to complete as many of the general degree requirements as 
possible before entering their junior year. Psychology majors should take PSY 101 and 220 
before the end of their sophomore years. Approved course distributions and annual 
schedules are available in the department office. All students are urged to seek advise- 
ment with regard to degree requirements and scheduling. 



SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES Itfl 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 
WITH A MAJOR IN PSYCHOLOGY 

I lours 

\ ( leneral Requirements 
Vrea l 

I I NG I'M I02oi 192 201 01 292 

a II 

1 \i \l 101 and 220 10 

: One of the sequences: CHI 121 L22,CH1 >, or PHS 121, 122 10 

\HM 111 

1 Ills H4 U5or 192 POS 113 

I ( O201 orSCX 201 

Krea l\ 

1. BIO mm 102 l<) 

: CS115 

I lis 251 or 252 

4 IM ioi Wl 201 ID 

taea V 

1. PE L17and I03or IDS 3 

2. I hree a< ti\ it\ courses 3 

B. 1 degree Requirements 

1. PS\ 220, 312, 4DS, 41D and 41 1 or 412 2^ 

2 Recommended selection of psychology courses 2^ 

3. Foreign language sequence 15 

C 1 lecth i' Courses 10-2^ 

1. An appropriate minor or selected upper o!i\ ision courses 10-25 

D. I nspecified 20 

\ . Regents' and \ \it Examinations D 



rOTAl 191-206 

Minor Concentrations 

I he Social and Behavioral Sciences otters minors in the following five areas: 

A Psychology — which requires 2D credit hours of upper division work. 

B. Mental 1 lealth— which requires PS\ 302, 315, 316, 328, 406. 

c Organizational Psychology — which requires five of the following: PS^ 302, 315, 

J20, 321,322,406. 
D. Anthropology — which requires 20 hours of upper division anthropology credits. 

Sociology — which requires 2D credit hours of upper division work. 
F. Economics — which requires 2D hours ot upper division work. 
All minor concentrations require a grade of "C" or better in each course. 

Anthropology Offerings 

A\ I 201 Introduction to Anthropology (5-0-5) 
Ottered each quarter. 

An introduction to the biocultural nature of humans through a survey of the 
subdisdplines of anthropology. The course i^ organized around an ecological and 
evolutionary framework. 



170 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



ANT/PBH 207 Introduction to Archaeology (5-0-5) 

Fall, 1994. 

The introductory archaeology course consists of a history of the field, basic 
techniques, theoretical underpinnings, and examples of field work from all types of 
excavation. It covers the range from early man to industrial and urban archaeology 
in a general fashion. Analysis is introduced along with survey techniques, preser- 
vation, reporting and other skills. (Identical with PBH 207.) 

ANT 302 Human Evolution (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ANT 201 or permission of instructor; BIO 101 and 102 strongly 

recommended. 

Biological anthropology is introduced through the principles of evolution and 

genetics, evolutionary forces, human variation and adaptation, primate evolution 

and behavior, the fossil record of human ancestors and early modern humans, and 

the relationship between human biology and culture. 

ANT 305 North American Indians (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ANT 201 or permission of instructor. 

A study of the prehistoric, historic and contemporary Native American popula- 
tions north of Mexico, emphasizing the role of the environment in the diversity and 
complexity of Native American cultures. 

ANT 308 Primate Social Behavior and Ecology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ANT 201 or permission of instructor. 

The social behavior and ecology of prosimians, monkeys, and apes and implica- 
tions for the evolution of human social behavior are examined. Topics include 
primate origins and evolutionary trends, survey of living primates, social organi- 
zation, ecology and social behavior, and models for the evolution of human 
behavior. 

ANT 310 Anthropology of Sex and Gender (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ANT 201 or permission of instructor. 

A study of the biological and cultural determinants of sex differences and sex roles. 
The relationship between sex roles and control of resources will be examined cross- 
culturally. 

ANT 400 Sorcery, Demons and Gods (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Anthropological analysis of religion as a universal category of culture. The super- 
natural will be considered: Mother goddesses myth, sorcery, shamanism, sacrifice 
and totemism. Belief systems in their sociocultural contexts will be emphasized. 

ANT/PBH 401 Fieldwork In Historical Archaeology (0-20-10) 

Spring. 

Prerequisite: PBH 207 or permission of instructor or director. 

An introduction to and first application of archaeological methods to a specific field 

project. Excavation techniques, surveying and map making, data collecting and 

recording, archaeological photography, the identification and analysis of artifacts, 

and the interpretation of archaeological data will be presented in field and 

laboratory work as well as in lectures and readings. (Identical with PBH 551 .) (Under 

certain circumstances this course may be substituted in the Preservation Studies minor 

for PBH 598.) Course may be repeated for credit. 

ANT/PBH 402 Practicum In Archaeological Analysis (2-6-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: permission of instructor or director. 
The application of archaeological interpretative techniques to a specific site or 
analytical problem. Individual research projects in the interpretation of archaeologi- 
cal data and the conservation of artifactual finds with special attention to the care 
and storage of collections, display in the museum setting, and the presentation of 
archaeologically-derived information. 

ANT 405 Sociobiology of Human Behavior (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ANT 201 or permission of instructor. 

The evolution of human social behavior is examined from a biological anthropo- 
logical perspective. Topics include altruism and kinship, human mating systems, 
reproduction and parenting, ecology of social systems, and life history strategies. 



SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 171 



\\l Ills 

PBH 158 Historical Udiacolog) (5-0-5) 

Wmtet ! 

Prerequisite PBI I 20 ' 01 permission ol the instnu t>>r 
tamtroductiontotheaichaeolog) of North America since the arrival of I un . 
tn the Ne* World smi.' attention will be paid to British and c ontimntsJ i'i>st 
Medici al Kn hacolog) m well as to the special .in-. is ,.t industrial and Nautical 
tachaeolog) 1 mphasiswill be given to anthropological archaeolog) smetl 
theor) both as 1 pe rs pe c tive foi the writing oi history and as •> compoi 
l Ustorit Presen anon 

\\l Ills 

PBH 459 American Material Culture (4-2*5) 

Winter 

An introduction to tlu- study of die non-literary remains <>t our km let) . past and 
pre s e n t Vernacular and polite architecture, ceramics, mortuarj art. communit) 
and Bettlement patterns, diet, dress and disease are among the topics that will b«- 
dis v ussed 

ANT/PBH 480 Special Topics In Archaeology (V-V-(l-5)) 
Prerequisites \\l PBH 207 \\i PBH 551 

I he course is designed to offer a wide 1 ariety of experience to advanced, upper level 
students in archaeological techniques. Subject matter will center on such topk b as 
archaeologica] graphic s, fauna! analysis I zooan haeology \,t onservation, or Involve 
some off-campus archaeologica] experience. 

Economics Offerings 

ECO 201 Principles of Macro Economics (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101 and MAT 101. 
\ surve) of macro econo m ics/ including basic economic concepts/ national income, 

the monetary System, and the international economy. 

ECO 202 Principles of Micro Economics (5-0-5) 

Ottered on demand . Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG 101 and MAT 101; ECO 201 not 
a prerequisite. 

A survey of micro-economics, including the composition and pricing of national 
output, government and the market economy, factor pricing and income distribu- 
tion, mm.\ a comparison of market systems. 

ECO 203 Principles of Accounting I (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Eligibility for MAT 101. 

An introduction to the fundamental principles and practices of accounting; the 
construction and interpretation of balance sheet and profit and loss statements; the 
theory of debits and credits and their application to the accounting pn 

ECO 204 Principles of Accounting II (5-0-5) 
Prerequisite: ECO 203. 

The application of accounting principles to specialized problems found in 
proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations, with emphasis on cost accounting 
theory, modern methods of data processing, and the sources and applications of funds. 

ECO 310 Multinational Economic Enterprises (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

Topics include how multinational economic enterprises have evolved over time, how 
they affect jobs and exports/imports in the U.S., and how they affect the economics 
of less developed countries. 

ECO 320 International Trade (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 202 or permission of instructor. 

This course examines the economic importance and problems of international trade. 
Topics include theories of international trade, the gains from trade, tariffs and non- 
tariff barrier to trade, U.S. commercial policy, economic integration and trade policies 
of developing countries. 



1 72 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

ECO 330 Economics of Finance (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

The study of governmental and corporate finance, with emphasis on fiscal and 
monetary policy. Open-market operations, discount policy, and the functions and 
problems associated with central banking will be examined and analyzed. 

ECO 340 Economics of Labor (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 202. 

An introductory general survey of labor economics and labor relations. Organization 
and operation of American trade unionism, collective bargaining, economics of the 
labor market, wage theory and income distribution also among topics studied. 

ECO 350 Managerial Economics 

Prerequisite: ECO 202, or permission of instructor. 

An examination of how economic theories may be used to aid in decision making 
in the private sector. Topics include demand and elasticity, production and cost 
theory, pricing policies, linear programming and capital budgeting. 

ECO 363 Economic History of the United States (5-0-5) 

Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

This course surveys the growth and development of economic institutions in the 
United States from the colonial period to the present, with emphasis on the period 
since 1860. Developments in agriculture, industry, labor, transportation, and finance 
will be studied and analyzed. (Identical with HIS 363). 

ECO 421 International Law of Expropriation and Compensation (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: POS 113. Corequisite: POS 326, "International Law," or permission of 
instructor. 

The course will examine the traditional Western view of the right of governments 
to expropriate foreign-owned property, and compare it to the views of many third- 
world and Marxist governments. Major takings of property owned by U.S. citizens and 
corporations will be highlighted. Arbitration and adjudication processes, as well as 
the role of the executive and legislative branches, will be examined. 

ECO 431 International Financial Institutions (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 201 or permission of instructor. 

This course analyzes international monetary relations. Topics include different 
exchange rate systems, the balance of payments, adjustment to balance of payments 
disequilibrium, and a survey of major international financial institutions, including 
IMF and the World Bank. Additional focus is on the role of central banks of the major 
countries in attempting to help stabilize the foreign exchange market. 

ECO 440 Seminar In Third World Economic Development (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 201 or permission of instructor 

The developing areas and their prospect for economic betterment are studied in this 
course. Topics include different theories of underdevelopment, analyzing different 
techniques employed by various less developed countries for development, including 
import substitutions and export-led growth. Focus is also on problems facing the third 
world at the present time, such as Third World debt. 

ECO 441 Regional Economics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 320 or permission of instructor. 

Study of transnational labor and transportation economics and of international 
trade, posited in the regional context. Emphasis will be placed on such topics as the 
European Economic Community and the Caribbean Basin Initiative. The social and 
political, as well as economic consequences of migratory labor and permanent 
immigrant labor will be addressed. 

ECO 445 Comparative Economic Systems (5-0-5) 
Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

The course will constitute a survey of the basic tenets of the major economic systems 
developed in the 19th and 20th centuries. The role of government and politics will 
be examined, along with the contributions to economic and political thought of such 
men as Adam Smith, Karl Marx, John Maynard Keynes, and Milton Friedman. 
(Identical with POS 445.) 



SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 



ECO 452 

153 IM Internship (\ \ I) 

Prerequisite lunioi >>i tenioi atandingand permi 

I lus course is designed t«> provide tin- student with 

academk understanding i*- an applied economic ill include 

nonprofit ageiv ies siu h as 1 1 a * - ( hambei «>t i omn i ell as finaru ial ii 

rions and International businesses Ii will be jointl) 

departmental instrw tors and agen< \ «>ttu ials I ransient students must ha 

mission oi tin- school dean .it Armstrong and «>t the college which I 

v omes 

Psychology Offerings 

ps^ 101 General Psychology (WW) 
Offered each quai I 

An introdw Hon to the \ a abular) . coru epts, and methods *>t the si ien< e *>t I i 
ior I Hs< ussion and demonstrations assist in Mm ey ing .ill tin- .irr.is ( >t psy< hology 
Psychology loi is prerequisite to .ill other courses in the department I ligibility f<>r 
I \(. . I i)i is strongly recommended. 

PS1 191 Honors General Psychology (2-3-5) 

Prerequisites: s A I verbal of at least 550. 

I his course may be substituted for PS\ 101 by qualified students, c ourse content 
is similar to PS\ 101, but emphasis is on psycholog) .is a laboratory science 
Students will conduct a variety ot experiments and demonstrations ^nd will write 
re s e ar c h reports on these topics, 

PSY 201 Human Growth and Development (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PS\ 101. 

A sun eyoi lifespan development that focuses on physical, emotional, cognitive and 
social development Understandings of growth and development are applied to 
classroom teaching and learning. Not recommended tor Psychology majors 

PSY 208 Psychology of Parenting (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A study of the psychological research and issues related to the family with i\n 
emphasis on child development, parenting styles, child abuse, dysfunctional 

families and community resources. I his course can be used by me Criminal Justice 
I raining Center program. 

PSY 220 Introduction to Psychological Research (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

An introduction to scientific methodology and its application to behavior analysis. 
Various techniques of data collection and the statistical analysis of such data are 
emphasized. 

PSY 295 Developmental Psychology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A study of the origin and development of psychological processes from the lite span 
perspective. Ihe effects of genetic/maturational ^\u\ socio-cultural environmen- 
tal factors on the development oi behavior throughout the life span are included. 

PSY 301 Educational Psychology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. Offered each quarter. 

The application oi behavioral science to the problem o\ learning in the classroom. 

Primarily tor teacher preparation. 

PSY 302 Psychological Testing (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

Survey of individual and group tests in psychological, educational, and clinical 
settings. Course focuses on the theoretical and statistical principles that underlie 
psychological and educational measurement. Standardized psychological instru- 
ments are critically analyzed. Ethical issues in psychological testing are considered. 



174 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PSY 303 Social Psychology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

The study of the behavior of others as determinants of the behavior of the indi- 
vidual. The cultural milieu and group pressures will be examined in terms of their 
effect on behavior. 

PSY 304 Fundamentals of Counseling and Psychotherapy (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A survey of personality theories and the behavior changing techniques arising from 
• them. The emphasis will be on learning theory and environmental influences. 

PSY 305 Topics in Development (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A survey of the fundamental issues, processes and theories of the field of develop- 
mental psychology. This approach to developmental concepts will focus on relevant 
research and practical applications through adolescence. This course may not be 
substituted for PSY 295 or PSY 201. 

PSY 307 Perception (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: PSY 101, 220. 

The nature of perceptual processes will be explored through experiment and 

theoretical analysis. 

PSY 309 Physiological Psychology (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: PSY 101, BIO 101 and 102. 

The structure and function of the nervous system will be analyzed and related to 

behavior using lecture, slide presentations, and tissue. 

PSY 310 Psychology of Human Sexuality (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

An examination of the developmental, physiological, clinical and social aspects of 
human sexuality. The emphasis of the course will be on the various components of 
human sexuality from a developmental perspective. 

PSY 311 Theories of Personality (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A study of selected personality theories with emphasis on normal behavior. 
Attention will be given to both experimental and clinical data. The determinants of 
personality structure and the development of personality will be examined from 
divergent points of view. 

PSY 312 Measurement (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101, 220. 

An examination of the theory of measurement. Reliability and validity techniques 

are discussed, using current psychological tests as examples. 

PSY 315 Psychology of Conflict and Stress (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A study of the interactions between physiological and psychological processes in the 
development and maintenance of stress related disorders. Emphasis is on environmen- 
tal factors and stress management techniques. 

PSY 316 Clinical Psychology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A survey of behavioral problems, treatment modes, and theories. 

PSY 319 Animal Behavior (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

The adaptations and behaviors with which living organisms cope with their 
environments will be studied through lecture and field work. Naturalistic observa- 
tion and experimental methods will be considered. 

PSY 320 Industrial/Organizational Psychology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101. 

A survey of applications of psychological principles to business and professional 

settings. Included are work motivation, goal setting, power politics, leadership and 

communication. 



SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 175 



rs>» ;:i Psycholog) of Work Bdunrta (5-4) Q 

Prerequisite I'M 101 

al analysis ol issues reUtcd to the individual worker in n 
inizations hu luded .n«- employee selei Hon trainii 
i\ aluatton and job s.itist.u Hon 
rs> 122 Psycholog) <>t Organization*] Development (5-0-5) 
IM 101 
Psychological principles applied to in te r p er son al and ii I 
zational leadership, managemenl o( organizational change relating to the 
em irorunenl My<\ oommunk at ion s\ stems 

?S\ 128 tbnoimaJ Psycholog) (5-0-5) 
Prerequisite PSi 101 

\ stud) of tin- scientific and cultural bases of various conceptions *»t undesirable 
beJun ior Application ol principles derived frombasu resean h will be emphasized 

psn |5Q c ognitive Psycholog) (5-0-5) 
Prereauisite PS\ 101. 

Vstud) ol the issues related to the various models of human in tor ma tun . 
with an emphasis on perceptual and linguistic development. Principles and appli- 
cations derived hrom bask research will be included. 

PSI 175 The Psychology of Aging (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY101. 

An analysis ol me aging process as physical ^nd biosocial change. Important 

adaptive aspects from health to economics will be considered with ^n emphasis on 

maintaining an optima] quality ot life. 
PSY 40b Behavior Modification (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PS\ 101. 

rudy of proven methods of generating behavioral change, their empirical 

foundations <.md their applications in clinical, educational and social settin] 

Ps i 408 Learning and Motivation (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: PS\ 101,220. 

A study of me methodology and theory associated with the various forms of learning 
and their motivational concomitant. The laboratory will pro\ ide an introduction to 
animal care, training and experimentation. 

PS i 410 History and Systems of Psychology (5-0-5) 

Open only to Psychology majors or bv invitation oi the instructor. 
Prerequisite: PSS' 101. 

A Study of the basic ideas in psychology from early animism to modern behaviorisfics. 
Special attention is given to the philosophical basis at various times in the history 
or psychology. 

PSY 41 1 Senior Seminar (5-0-5) 

Open only to senior psychology majors or by invitation of the professor. 

A reading and discussion group which will concentrate on selected contemporar\ issues 

in psychology. Specific content will vary from year to year. 

PSY 412 Senior Project (V-V-5) 

Prerequisite: Senior status. 

Each student will work with a faculty member qualified in the student's area of 
interest. Work is to begin in the first quarter oi the senior year (register for the 
quarter of expected completion). The student will produce a scholarly paper which 
must be acceptable to the departmental faculty. 

PSY 413 Senior Internship (V-V-5) 

Prerequisite: Senior status. 

Students may petition the faculty to receive academic credit for an individually 
designed work experience in an applied setting. The sponsoring organization must 
provide a qualified supervisor. A faculty advisor will establish p erform ance criteria 
and evaluate accordingly. The student will produce a scholarly paper which must 
be acceptable to the departmental faculty. 



1 76 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Sociology Offerings 

SOC 201 Introductory Sociology (5-0-5) 

Offered each quarter. 

An introduction to the concepts and methods of the science of human group behavior. 
Includes the study of socialization, culture, race, ethnicity, gender, age, and social 
institutions. It is designed to provide a better understanding of American society and 
social phenomena. Eligibility for ENG 101 is strongly recommended. 

SOC 315 The Family and Alternative Lifestyles (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SOC 201. 

A study of the institution which has major responsibility for socializing members of 

society. Consideration will be given to various forms and types of families. 

SOC 320 Ethnic minorities (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SOC 201. 

This course focuses on the historical and /or contemporary realities of sub-cultural 
life in these United States, especially where skin color and language pose social and 
economic barriers. Examined are the cultural and structural factors which shape 
and inform the particular experiences of groups. It looks at dominant public 
institutions and patterns of response by minorities such as Black Americans, 
Chicanos, Puerto Ricans, Native Americans, and other sizeable ethnic groups. 

SOC 333 Exploring Popular Culture (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: SOC 201. 

An examination of popular culture using music, radio, television, texts, magazines, 

movies, technology and language to explore a given era. Comparisons will be made 

of lifestyles, sex roles, racial attitudes and the national regional mood of times 

examined. 

SOC 340 Methods of Social Research (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SOC 201. 

This course will explore several methods of applied social research including case 
studies, record research, experimental designs, surveys, observation and systems 
interaction as they apply to social data. The student must demonstrate a working 
knowledge of each method in the context of social work practice. 

SOC 350 Social Problems (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SOC 201. 

This course is an examination of deviant behavior, normalcy, and the differences 

between social ideals and social realities in the context of sociological theory. 

SOC 401/ 

402/403 Special Topics in Sociology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SOC 201. 

Upper-level courses not otherwise offered in the sociology curriculum. Coverage of 
substantive topics, theoretical issues, and problems will vary. May be repeated for 
credit with different topics. No more than two such courses may be counted toward 
the minor in sociology. 

SOC 430 Alcohol and Drug Studies (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: SOC 201. 

A course focusing on the various forms of alcohol and drug abuse with emphasis 
on the stages of harmful dependence and addiction. There will be an examination 
of the legal and social implications of addiction as well as approaches to treatment 
and rehabilitation. 

SOC 450 Independent Study (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

By invitation of the professor. Offered on demand. Open to transient students only 
with permission of the Dean of Arts, Sciences and Education at Armstrong. 



1 






SX 



M 










178 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

Newberry, S. Lloyd, Dean 
Stokes, William W., Assistant Dean 

Philosophy, Goals, and Objectives 

The School of Education offers a variety of degree programs designed for the 
preparation of competent teachers who are committed to excellence in the profession and 
who are ultimately prepared to become decision makers in the classroom. Appropriate 
to this philosophy the faculty have established three program outcomes which develop 
and exemplify the teacher as: (1) deliverer of content, (2) manager of classroom dynamics, 
and (3) developer of professional self. 

Pursuant and preamble to these outcomes the School of Education has developed the 
following goals: 

To provide prospective teachers with proficiency in the content of their selected 
teaching field. 

To provide the prospective teacher with the appropriate learning theory and method- 
ology necessary to successful implementation of classroom plans and procedures. 

To provide prospective teachers with the abilities and skills which will enable them 
to offer appropriate educational opportunities to students representing a variety of 
cultural and economic backgrounds. 

To provide prospective teachers with the abilities and skills that will enable them to 
meet the special needs of exceptional children. 

To provide a teacher education program that will offer the professional and educa- 
tional atmosphere conducive to the development of teachers who possess the highest 
qualities of character, commitment, and professional competence. 

Each degree program in the School of Education is guided by an individual set of 
objectives which is specific to that degree program, but also reflects the School goals. 

Organization and Degrees 

The School of Education consists of two divisions: the Division of Curriculum and 
Instruction and the Division of Health and Physical Education. 

The Division of Curriculum and Instruction offers the following degrees: 
The Division of Education offers the following degrees: 

Bachelor of Science in Education in: 

Art Education 

Business Education (with Savannah State College) 

Early Elementary Education 

Middle School Education 

Social Sciences Education (History) 

Social Sciences Education (Political Science) 

Speech Correction 
With the School of Arts and Sciences: 

Biology with Teacher Certification 

Chemistry with Teacher Certification 

English with Teacher Certification 

History with Teacher Certification 

Mathematics with Teacher Certification 

Music Education 

Political Science with Teacher Certification 

The Division of Health and Physical Education offers the following degrees: 

B.S. in Health and Physical Education. 

Graduate degrees (M.Ed.) are offered by Georgia Southern University in affiliation 
with Armstrong State College. For particulars, see the graduate section of the catalog. 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 179 



Accreditation 

\ll teachei education programs al Armstrong State ( ol me 

rgia Professional Standards ( ommission and the National Council foi ition 

oi I i-.u hei I du< ation 

Academic Advisement 

Students desiring to pursue a teacher education program should seel academic 
advisement in tin- appropriate division (( urriculum and Instruction <>r Health and 
Physical Education) An ad> isoi will be assigned to ea< h student and u ill assist the 
student in establishing a program ol stud) form which should be followed without 
de> kh ion I hese forms will be filed in the appropriate dh ision office and a copy provided 
so each student, it is the responsibility ot the student to initiate and maintain the 
ad\ isement pro< ess 

All completed courses to be used to satisf) tin- requirements of a student's course oi 
stud) must be included on the official Program Studies Planning Form .it tin- time ot its 
acceptance b) the dh ision head. 

Admission to Teacher Education 

\ student wishing to pursue a teacher education program leading to teacher certifi- 
cation must apply tor admission to the teacher education program. I his application will 
be filed normally during the second quarter of the sophomore year or, tor transfer 

students, in the first quarter of the junior year. Application forms ma) be sec ured from 

the appropriate di\ won. 

I he following criteria apply tor admission to the teacher education program: 

1. Completion ol at least 60 quarter hours of college credit with a minimum 2.^ 
(unrounded) GPA. 

2. Completion of EDN 200 and ENG 101, 102, and 201 or their equivalents, with a 
or better in each com 

3. Competence in oral and written expression. 

4. Indication o\ desirable attitude, character, and teaching potential. 

5. Satisfactory completion of the Regents' Test. Students already holding baccalaure- 
ate degrees from an accredited institution are exempted from the Regents rest. 

6. Submission o\ four letters o\ recommendation; such letters mav be secured from 
college or universities where applicants may have been previously enrolled. 
Submission of an up-to-date copy oi the program of studv planning sheet. 

Recommendation for Certificate 

To be recommended for a teaching certificate, a student must complete the degree 
requirements for an approved teacher certification program of Armstrong State College 
and must complete at Armstrong State College a majority of the courses in each of the 
following areas: the professional sequence, the teaching field, and the related field. 

Liability Insurance Requirement 

All students who participate in courses for which field experiences (i.e.. laboratory 
practicum) are required must provide evidence of liability insurance (i.e., SG AH member- 
ship or must sign a waiver of insurance coverage). Students should consult their ad\ isors 
regarding this requirement. 

September Practicum 

The purpose of the September Practicum is to provide an opportunitv for future 
teachers (1) to learn what teachers do at the beginning o\ a new school term, 2 
participate in experiences that will assist the prospective teacher with future decisions 
concerning teaching as a career, and (3) to become acquainted with the organization and 
curriculum of a particular school. 



180 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



The September Practicum occurs during the first two weeks of the public school term 
(usually in late August and early September) and should be scheduled during the 
student's junior or senior year. No credit is given for the September Practicum, but it is 
a requirement in all of the teaching fields in the Armstrong State College Teacher 
Education Program. 

Application for the September Practicum should be made during the first week of the 
Spring Quarter for a September Practicum in the forthcoming September. The student 
should contact the Director of Professional Laboratory Experiences. 

Student Teaching 

Student teaching, the culminating activity of the professional sequence, is provided in 
selected off-campus school centers. The full quarter of student teaching is arranged 
cooperatively by the college, the participating schools, and supervising teachers. Com- 
pleted applications for admission to student teaching must be submitted to the 
Director of Professional Laboratory Experiences during the first week of the quarter 
preceding student teaching. While student teaching, the student is required to adhere to 
established policies and procedures of the cooperating school system in addition to those 
policies and procedures established by the college. 

A student is admitted to student teaching at the time assignment is made. School 
placement is jointly arranged by the college and the participating school system. The 
student will receive a letter of assignment. Orientation to student teaching will be held 
during the first several days of the quarter in which student teaching is scheduled. The 
following requirements must be met before a student can enroll in student teaching: 

1. Completion of the core curriculum. 

2. Admission to Teacher Education. 

3. Completion of all teaching field courses. 

4. Satisfactory completion of the September Practicum and the Regents' Exam. 

5. Satisfactory completion of the Media Competency Exam or EDN 240. 

6. Have at least senior status. 

7. Completion of the basic 10 hours of methods and curriculum at Armstrong. 

8. Have a 2.5 average on all courses attempted, and "C" or better in all courses 
acceptable toward the teaching field, professional sequence, concentration, and 
related electives. 

9. Be endorsed by four approved full time members of the faculty, one of whom must 
be the student's advisor. 

10. Be endorsed by the Division of Curriculum and Instruction. 

Students who are completing requirements for certification as outlined in a State 
Department of Education Letter and are requesting a student teaching assign- 
ment must have a minimum 2.5 GPA and be in good academic standing. They 
must also meet the requirements found in items 7, 9, and 10 above. 
A student will not be permitted to take additional courses during student teaching. 

Student teachers are not permitted to teach in a school in which their children are 

enrolled. 

Program Completion 

A student must complete the college's approved program for certification within the 
four years following admission to the Teacher Education program. In the event that the 
student does not complete the program in four years, the individual must meet the 
requirements of the program in effect at that time. 

For acceptable completion, each course in the teaching field, professional education 
sequence concentration, and related fields must be passed with a grade of "C" or better. 

Exit Examination 

Students are required to take the Georgia Teacher Certification Test during student 
teaching or immediately upon completion of their degree program. 



DIVISION OF CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 181 



Application for Graduation 

Students ire required to complete the Application foi Graduation .it least tw< 
quarters prioj to graduating Students need to submit an application foi graduation, 
updated cop) of men bran* riptsand Program of Stud) to their advisors fhe application 
will be che< ked in the appropriate division head 

Brunswick Center Programs 

rhe Bachelor of Science in I ducation with concentrations in I arlj i hildhood and 
Middle School I du< ation is offered b) Armstrong State t ollege .it Brunsv* u k c ollege 
through the Brunsu i< k c lenter. I he program, nhu h is primaril) an e^ ening program, 
allows students w ho hsn e an associate degree to ( omplete their ba< ( alaureate degree in 
Brunswick. Interested students should conta< tDr.i iene Barber, l torei torot theBrunswu k 
c enter or l hr. w arren Schollaert, l Mrector oi l ea< her I ducation. 

Cooperative Program 

m\ annah State College cooperates with Armstrong State C ollege in offering a major 
in Business Education. C oursework in the major field ot study for this program is offered 

b\ Savannah State. Students interested in this program should contact the head of the 
l )i\ ision of Curriculum ^nd Instruction at Armstrong State College. 

Minor Concentration 

A minor in teacher education is a\ ailable for students who do not wish to earn teacher 
certification The minor incorporates courses which address leading concepts ,\nd 
problems in the field of education. Students majoring in general studies, psychology, 
health science, and other fields may find this minor a valuable adjunct to their programs 
of Study. For the minor to be officially recognized, all courses in the minor must be passed 
with a grade oi "C" or better. 

EDN 200 - Orientation to Teaching 5 

EXC 310 - Introduction to Exceptional Children 5 

EDN 201 - or PSY 201 - Human Growth and Development 5 

EDN 240 - Educational Media 2 

CS 296 - Computer Literacy for Educators 3 

One additional upper divisional education course 

(Illustrative courses include library media courses, EDN courses and 

EXC courses.) 

Total 25 

Academic Divisions 
Division of Curriculum and Instruction 

Faculty 

* Battiste, Bettye Anne, Division Head Gosnell, Roberta 

* Agyekum, Stephen * Harwood, Pamela, Associate 
Anderson, Donald Director Graduate Studies 
Ball, A. Patricia Hobe, John 

Bergin, Joyce Schollaert, Warren 

Bjorn, Edith Sisson, Michelle 

* Burgess, Clifford * Stokes, William, Assistant Dean 
Chenault, George Strauser, Edward 

* Cosgrove, Maryellen Walworth, Margaret 

* Dandy, Evelyn White, Susan 

* Graduate Faculty 
Baccalaureate Advisor, Aeger, Vicki L. 



182 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Bachelor Programs 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION IN EARLY ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102, or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103 or 290 (with a grade of C or better) 10 

2. Approved laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201; ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN 200, 201 or PSY 201 10 

2. DRS 228, PSY 101 10 

3. HIS 251 or 252 and GEO 211 or 212 10 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 166 3 

2. Activity courses 3 

B. Specialized Content Courses 45 

1. ART 320 or MUS 320 5 

2. MAT 391 , 5 

3. EDN 324, 336, 342, 422, 434, 435 30 

4. CS 296 and PE 117 5 

C. Professional Sequence 35 

1. EXC 310, EDN 304, 432, 436, 471, 472, 473 35 

D. Electives (upper division content) 15 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 191 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE IN EDUCATION IN MIDDLE SCHOOL EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 103 or 290 (with a grade of C or better) 10 

2. Approved laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. One course from: ANT 201, ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. GEO 211 or 212 and HIS 251 or 252 10 

2. DRS 228, PSY 101, EDN 200 15 

3. EDN 201 or PSY 201 5 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108; 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 



DIVISION OF CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 183 



fitent ( oursea Required and »>r Appropriate for < oncentration < ho 
i his required) 

I DN \l \l W ind MAI 

must be iiv luded here 01 In < » 

mcentrations 
MATC oncentration must ind M \i > v 'i 
S< i ( oncentration must ind EDN4 
I \ ( oncentration must ind I I >\ 
SOC s l Concentration must ind EDN 
l i oncentr a tion I 

Language \ita Mathematics Sdeno J Studies 

^ oncentration II 

Must be from remainder in ^ oncentration I 
l) Professional Sequence 

l C S 

: BX( no, EDN 471,472,473 

\ Regents and Exit I xaininations 

rOTAl 194 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION IN SOCIAL SCIENCES EDUCATION (HISTORY) 

Hours 

\ General Requirements 

Area I 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192,201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: AR1 200,271,272,273 MUS 200; PHI 201 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101. 220 10 

2 Approved laboratory science sequence 10 

Area 111 20 

1. HIS 104. L15orl92;POS 113 L5 

: PS\ 101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN 200 and EDN 201 or PS\ 201 10 

2. One course from: ARI 200. 271,272, 273; DRS 228; MLS 200 

3. Approved language sequence through 103 1 5 

Area V b 

1. TF 103 or 108, 117 

2 Three activity courses 3 

3 Required Elective: 

One course from AN I 201, ECO 201, SOC 201 5 

B. Teaching Concentration 

1. HIS 251 or 252; HIS 371 or 377 10 

2. HIS 450 5 

v approved Non-Western HIS 

course(s) 5-10 

4. Approved 300+ US HIS course 

5. Approved European HIS coursers) 5-10 

C. Courses Related to Concentration 30 

1. ECO 201, 202, 363 10-15 

2. GEO 211, 212, elective 10-15 

3. POS305 

4. POS 317, 318 5-10 



184 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



D. Professional Sequence 30 

1. EXC 310, EDN 335, 449 15 

2. EDN 471, 472, 473 15 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 196 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE IN EDUCATION IN SOCIAL SCIENCES 
EDUCATION (POLITICAL SCIENCE) 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102, or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 220 10 

2. Approved laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. PSY101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN 200 and EDN 201 or PSY 201 10 

2. One course from: ANT 201; ECO 201, 202; any GEO course; SOC 201 ...5 

3. Approved language sequence through 103 15 

Area V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

3. Required elective; 

One course from ART 200, 271, 272, 273; DRS 228; MUS 200 5 

B. Teaching Concentration 30 

1. POS 305 and 317 or 318 10 

2. POS 333 or 334 5 

3. POS 320, 321, 325, 326, 329, 424, 426, or 429 5 

4. POS 345, 346, 348, 349, 445 or 447 5 

5. POS Upper Level Elective 5 

C. Courses Related to Concentration 35 

1. HIS 251 or 252 5 

2. Courses from three of the following: 

a. GEO 211, 212, elective 10-15 

b. ECO 201, 202, 363 10-15 

c. 300+ HIS electives 10-15 

d. ANT, PSY, SOC electives 10-15 

D. Professional sequence 30 

1. EXC 310 5 

2. EDN 335, 449, 471, 472, 473 25 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 196 



DIVISION OF CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 185 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE IN EDUCATION IN ART EDUCATION 

I limrs 

\ ( ieneral Requirements loi 

W.I I 

1 I V, 101 I02oi 192 201 oi 292 

One course from \Kl 200 2 I I PHI 201 

trea II 

1 \l \l 101 290 1" 

d laboratory s v ience sequence n» 

\UM Ml 

1. Ills n4 H5oi 192; POS 113 . L5 

2 Onecourserrom VNT 201; ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 

a 1\ 

l 1 D\ 200, PS\ 101 K) 

: I l>\ 201 or PS^ 201 

\KI ill. 112,213 15 

Vrea V 

1. PE I03or L08, 117 3 

2. I hree >u ti\ it) courses 

State Requirement 5 

His 251 or 252 

IV reaching Concentration I 

1. ARI 201, 202, 204 15 

: \KI 271, 272 : - ^ 10-15 

\KI J13, 314, 330, 340, 350, 351, 370, 400 

4. Elective 3 

t. Professional Sequence 2^ 

1. EXC 310, EDN 333, 471, 472. 473 25 

D. Electives 0-5 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 194-199 
"\Ln not be duplicated in Area I. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION IN BUSINESS EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 106 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102. 201 13 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271 272 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 195 10 

2. Approved laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192, POS 113, ECO 201 20 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN 200, PSY 101, DRS 228 13 

2. EDN 201 or PSY 201, MAT 220, HIS 231 or 232 1 5 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 



186 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



B. Additional Requirements 

May Be Exempted 5 

OSM121 2 

OSM122 3 

C. Teaching Concentration 75 

1. BAD 201, ACC 211, ACC 212 15 

2. BAD 225, ECO 202 10 

3. ACC 300, OSM 320, OSM 340, BAD 317, BAD 320, BAD 340 BAD 362, 

OSM 405, OSM 420 BAD 440 50 

D. Professional Sequence 32 

1. EDN240 2 

2. EXC 310, EDN 335, BED 350 15 

3. EDN 471, 472, 473 15 

E. Regents' and Exit Exams 

Total 203 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION WITH A MAJOR IN SPEECH CORRECTION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 96 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. MAT 101 and 290, or 103, or 195, or 220 10 

2. Approved laboratory science sequence 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192; POS 113 15 

2. ANT 201 or ECO 201 or SOC 201 or ECO 202 5 

Area IV 30 

1. EDN 200; PSY 101, 295 15 

2. EDN 201 or PSY 201 5 

3. HIS 251 or 252 5 

4. One course from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; DRS 228 5 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108, 117 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Teaching Concentration 60 

1. EXC 220, 225, 230, 315, 335 25 

2. EXC 410, 411, 412, 413, 415, 420, 421 35 

C. Courses Related to Concentration 15 

PSY 328 5 

PSY 302 5 

Approved elective 5 

D. Professional Sequence 25 

1. EXC 310 5 

2. EDN 422, 471, 472, 473 20 

E. Regents' and Exit Examinations 



TOTAL 196 






DIVISION OF CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 187 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
EDUCATION WITH A MAJOR IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

V >i I rhis program is listed under Division of 1 lealth and Physical I ducation 
Library Science Media 

1 he Library Science Media program has three emphases Hi bash lit 
i ourses aiul specialized ^kill courses designed to help students in spe< ifi< subje< t 
dei elop reseait h skills; (2) careen ourses roi prosper tive media spe< ialists and pei 
interested in public and spe< iaJ libraries and i \) basu resean h ( ourses w hit h m 
eta led b) majors in othej areas 

Certification Program 

rhe \ s 4 in media is a non-renewable certificate thai must in- upgraded to an S-5 
(master's le> el) within five (5) years 

C eradication in I ibrar) Media ma) be obtained In completing 4o quarter hours in 
media and related courses with grades ol "( " or better. I his program must be iru orpo 
rated into an existing teaching major. I he following courses are required for certification 
as .1 school library media specialist 

Hours 

\ 1 \1 500, 510, 320, 410. 420, 425 2^ 

B. \ DN 240, 451; CS 296 10 

( i me course from: 1 DN 524, 418; EDN 423 5 

rOTAl 40 

Non-Certification Program 

\ student may choose any field of concentration which allows a double major, rhe 

major in Library Media is comprised of the following: 

Hours 

A. LM 300, 310, 320, 410, 420, 425 25 

B. EDN 240, 431; CS 2% or 113 10-12 

C. One course from: EDN 324, 418; EDN 423; DRS/FLM 347 3 

TOTA1 40-42 

Library Media Minor 

A student choosing to minor in Library Media is required to complete the following 
courses with grades of "C" or better in each: 

Hours 

A. LM 300, 310, 320 12 

B. LM 410. 420, 425 13 

TOTA1 25 

Learning Disabilities Add-On 

Learning Disabilities (grades K-12) may be added to certification in elementary or 
middle school education bv successful completion of the following coura 

EXC 312 - Introduction to Learning Disabilities 
EXC 430 - Teaching Children with Disabilities 
EXC 340 - Behavior Management 
EDN 320 - Tests and Measurements 
EXC 315 - Language Development 



188 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Education students interested in an endorsement in Learning Disabilities need to see 
a Special Education advisor in the Division of Curriculum and Instruction in order to 
identify the appropriate courses. 

The above "add-on" in LD would consist of a non-renewable provisional certificate at 
the T-4 level in Learning Disabilities. In order for the student to obtain a non-provisional 
certificate, other requirements, outlined by the State Department of Education would 
have to be satisfied. 

Education Offerings 

EDN 200 Orientation to Teaching (5-0-5) 

The study of the status of education and of teaching as a profession. The student 
engages in directed self-study and plans for the achievement of professional goals. 
Directed observation. 

EDN 201 Human Growth and Development (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 200. 

A survey of lifespan development that focuses on physical, emotional, cognitive, 
and social development. Understandings of growth and development are applied 
to classroom teaching and learning. 

EDN 202 Health and the Young Child (3-0-3) 

Study of factors impacting upon the physical social and emotional health of young 
children, including food and nutrition, safety, disease and trauma. 

EDN 240 Education Media (1-2-2) 

Workshop experience in the selection, utilization, evaluation, and preparation of 
various kinds of media. Emphasis is placed on utilization of media in teaching. 

EDN 304 Childhood and Adolescence (4-6-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 200. 

An overview of the developmental process of children from birth through adoles- 
cence. Students will explore various factors which affect development and will 
examine the inter-relationship of school achievement and societal factors. The six 
hours per week laboratory component will include use of school and community 
resources. 

EDN 320 Test and Measurements (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 200. 

A beginning course in measurement which covers statistical methods, research 
designs and research problems. Students are provided experiences in the adminis- 
tration and evaluation of psychological tests. 

EDN 324 Literature for Children (5-1-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

A study of children's books and selections from books. Designed to assist future 
teachers in the selection of the best that has been written in the realm of children's 
literature for each period of the child's life. Directed field experiences. 

EDN 335 Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, General (3-6-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education; PSY 201 or EDN 201. 
The study of secondary school curriculum and methods. Detailed study is given to 
techniques of systematic observation, preparation of behavioral objectives, analy- 
sis of critical incidents, production of media materials, practices of classroom 
control, and examination of instruction models. Directed field experiences. 

EDN 336 Elementary School Language Arts (5-4-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Designed to offer the student the opportunity to explore methods, content, and 
materials used in teaching the skills of communicative arts to children. Directed 
field experiences. 

EDN 342 Elementary School Social Studies (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Focus upon fundamental social studies skills and processes needed by children. 

Directed observation. 



DIVISION OF CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION III 



I d\ no Independent Stud) (1-8-5) 
Prerequisite Vdmission t.> I 
Students condtK t in In depth 
topi< in cvlu. ation I he student 

\U h and Stud) 

u»\ n i Adolescent Ftycholog) I I 

I v>v us (Mi the phenomenon of modern ad< I mphasis upon the intelh 

v ultural and personal transitions ol the adoles< ent period 

EDN 418 i iteraturc foi the Middle School i earnei I i 

Prerequisite Admission to reachei Education 

Pi ov ides opportunity for prospective and insen ice tea< hers to explore multimedia 
offerings ol literar) value and ol significance to age level ol learners found in tlu- 
middle si hool Relates literature to .»ll areas ol the middle s< hool ( urri< ulum 

IP\ 122 rhe reaching of Reading K-4 (5-4-5) 

P re r e q uisite Admission to reacher I ducation 

Stud) ol tlu- de> elopmental reading program I mphasis will be placed on reading 
skills, approaches, techniques, materials and evaluation tor classroom use 
Directed field experiences 

I DN 423 Adolescent l iteraturc (5-0-5) 
tffered on demand. 
Prerequisite: Admission to reacher Education. 
A stud) ol significant literature appropriate tor adolescents. 

I DN 424 Practicum In Individual Reading Instruction (2-8-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 422. 

Designed to pro> ide prospective teachers with directed practice in the teaching ol 

reading. Special emphasis will be placed upon diagnosis ^nd teaching ol needed 

reading skills Students will be required to tutor at least one remedial reader. 

Directed field experiem 
EDN 42S Methods for Teaching Reading In the Middle School (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to reacher Education. 

Primary focus upon reading as a tool tor extending learning in the content areas oi 

the middle school. 

I tDN 430 Diagnosing and Prescribing for Learning Problems (5-0-5) 
Prerequisite: EDN 422 or 428. 

Diagnostic and prescriptive process principles underlying assessment and correc- 
tion of learning problems. Designed to help the classroom teacher (1) determine 
performance levels and needs of pupils and (2) provide effective learning assis- 
tance. 

EDN 432 Methods and Materials for K-4 (5-2-5) 

Prerequisites: Admission to reacher Education and EDN 304. 

Examination of teaching resources, teaching strategies and the range of interper- 
sonal relationships involved in teaching young children. Directed field experiences. 

EDN 434 Methods and Curriculum of Elementary Life Science (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Interpretation of lite science tor elementary school teaching: exploration of pro- 
■ s tor translating meaning into classroom practice, emphasis upon inquiry, the 
discovery process and other science teaching strategies 

Methods and Curriculum of Elementary Physical Science (5-0-5) 
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

Interpretation of physical science tor elementary school teaching including explo- 
ration of processes for translating meaning into classroom practice, with emphasis 
upon the discovery process and other science teaching strata 



190 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

EDN 436 Curriculum and Teaching K-4 (5-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education and EDN 304. 
This course is the study of early elementary curricula, existing administrative and 
instructional organizations, evaluation procedures, and experiences in curriculum 
at the primary level (K-4). It includes study and development of teaching materials. 
Directed field experiences. 

EDN 438 Curriculum and Teaching (4-8) (5-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education and EDN 304. 
This course is the study of Middle School curricula, existing administrative and 
instructional organizations, evaluation procedures, and experiences in curriculum 
at the middle school level (4-8). It includes study and development of teaching 
materials. Directed field experiences. 

EDN 439 Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, English (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or EDN 201 and admission to Teacher Education. 

The study of secondary school English curriculum with emphasis upon materials 

and methods of teaching English. Directed observation. 

EDN 441 Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, Mathematics (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Prerequisite: MAT 260. 

The study of secondary school mathematics curriculum with emphasis upon 

materials and methods of teaching mathematics. Directed observations. 

EDN 445 Reading In the Secondary School (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 

This course is designed to provide students with the rationale for teaching reading 

as they teach their content areas in the secondary school. 

EDN 447 Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, Science (5-0-5) 

Offered on demand. 

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education, PSY 201 or EDN 201, and EDN 335. 

The study of secondary school science curriculum with emphasis upon materials 

and methods of teaching science. Directed observations, 
r* ° 

EDN 449 Secondary School Curriculum and Methods, Social Science (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education; PSY 201 or EDN 201 and EDN 335. 
The study of secondary school social science curriculum with emphasis upon 
materials and methods of teaching social science. Directed observations. 

EDN 450 The Middle School (5-4-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education and EDN 304. 
An overview of the history and purpose of the middle school; characteristics of the 
middle school learner, emphasis upon the nature and role of the middle school 
teacher and upon appropriate programs and methods for the needs of middle 
school learners. Directed field experiences. 

EDN 451 Teaching Media (2-6-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 240 or permission of instructor. 

Laboratory course in designing and producing instructional media: transparencies, 

slides, tapes and other media for teaching. 

EDN 460 Multi-Cultural Education (5-0-5) 

Designed to study the educational implications of cultural diversity. Examination 
of the school programs designed to meet the needs and interests of children from 
different ethnic backgrounds. 



DIVISION OF CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 



EDN 471 Student Teaching Knowledge of Content UM H 

ii'\ Student Teaching Instructional Methoda and Material! (CM 

EDN473 Student Teachinj ProreaaionaJ Interpersonal Skills UM I) 

Prerequisite See General Requi r eme n t* teacher Educatioi 
.m- pla< i-vl in seta ted schools foi one quartet as full timestud< 
additional >. redil hours ma) be earned w Kile student tea< hi: 
ences and othei staff responsibilities .ir»- jointly supervised b) • 
supervising teachers and principals in tin- selected s k h<M>u Open I 
students onl) * ith permission oi the I Kre< toi >>t Professional I al 
ences .»t Armstrong and of the ^ ollege from w hk h the student i i ■ 

I DN 181 Internship (O-V-1 to -> 

Prerequisites Permission oi the l hrr, tor of Professional I al 

criteria tor meeting prerequisites are on file in the I Kre< tor's offii «• 

Students who hold teaching positions in school and <>r clink settings will be 

supervised bj t ollege st.itt member for one academi< quarter Supervisors will 

obsen e and hold conferences with each candidate, t ompletionoi tin- fifteen hour 

sequence will depend on program requirements 

EDN 4s: Internship <o-\-i to -> 

Prerequisites Permission of me Director of Professional Laborator) I icpei 
criteria tor meeting prerequisites are on file in the 1 Krector's off 
Students ivho hold teaching positions in school and/or clink settings will be 
supervised bj College staff member tor one academic quarter Supervisors will 
observe and hold confere n ces with each candidate. Completion of the fifteen hour 
sequence will depend on p rogr am requirements. 

EDN 483 Internship (O-V-1 to 5) 

Prerequisites: Permission of the Director of Professional Laborator) 1 xperiences; 

criteria tor meeting prerequisites are on tile in the Director's office. 
Students who hold teaching positions in school and/or clinic settings will be 
supervised by College staff member for one academic quarter. Supervisors will 
observe ^nd hold conferences with each candidate. Completion of the fifteen hour 
sequence will depend on program requirements. 

Exceptional Children Offerings 

I X( courses must be taken in the approved sequence. These courses must be completed 
with a grade oi "C" or better to continue in the sequence. You should see the Education 
Program Advisor before you begin taking any EXC courses. 

EXC 220 Introduction to Communicative Disorders (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

An introduction to the types, etiologies, and remediation sources and techniques of 
various communicative dysfunctions in children and adults in the areas of lan- 
guage, articulation, voice and stuttering. Emphasis is on the recognition and 
awareness of these disorders, appropriate classroom strategies, and treatment 
referral. 

EXC 225 Phonetics for Speech Correctionists (3-4-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission oi instructor. 

Deals with the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) in speech correc- 
tion, IPA transcription of normal and defective articulation and the important 
characteristics of regional dialects are stressed. 

EXC 230 Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech and Hearing 

Mechanism (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Anatomy and physiology of the head, neck, and thorax from a speech and hearing 
standpoint. Special emphasis is placed on functional considerations oi the respira- 
tory system, larynx, oral and nasal structures, and ear. 



EXC 312 



192 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



EXC 310 Introduction to Exceptional Children (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: EDN 200 and PSY 201 or EDN 201. 

An orientation to exceptional children with emphasis on educational implications 
and rehabilitation requirements. Includes classroom discussion of and visitations 
to facilities for training. 

Introduction to Learning Disabilities (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: EXC 310 and permission of instructor. 

An introduction to the area of specific learning disabilities, with an emphasis on 

identification, terminology, and prevalence. 

EXC 315 Normal Speech and Language Development (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

The study of normal language development with emphasis on oral language. This 
course traces developmental scales of speech and language growth across various 
age levels and includes the relationship between speech and language. Observa- 
tions. 

EXC 335 Speech Science (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Speech communication from a psychophysical standpoint. Study focuses on acous- 
tics, physics of speech, transmission media, and physical analysis of speech. 

EXC 340 Behavior Management for the Exceptional Child (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

A study of the application of behavioral principles for the management and growth 
of exceptional learners. Consultation in using the principles with other teachers and 
with parents will also be emphasized. 

EXC 410 Introduction to Audiology (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education and permission of instructor. 
An introduction to the methods of hearing assessment through pure tone and 
speech audiometry, with a focus on rehabilitation of the hearing impaired. Super- 
vised clinical practice. 



EXC 411 Stuttering (4-2-5) 

H Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education and permission of instructor. 

An introduction to the problem of stuttering, its possible causes and the manage- 
ment training of cases. Supervised clinical practicum. 

EXC 412 Language Disorders (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education and permission of instructor. 
An introduction to language disorders of children and adults. Etiologies, evalua- 
tion procedures, and therapeutic approaches are studied. Major emphasis will be 
given to delayed language development. Supervised clinical practicum. 

EXC 413 Organically Based Communication Problems (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education and permission of instructor. 
The course includes a study of the communication problems related to disorders of 
voice, cleft palate, and cerebral palsy. Supervised clinical practicum. 

EXC 415 Articulation Disorders (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: EXC 225, admission to Teacher Education and permission of 

instructor. 

A study of the etiology, rationale, evaluation, and methods of therapy for disorders 

of articulation. The course includes the development of a therapeutic program, 

lesson plans, and supervised clinical practicum. 

EXC 420 Public School Program Administration (2-6-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education and permission of instructor. 
Administration and implementation of public school speech therapy programs 
including identification, case load selection, scheduling, inservice, and relationship 
of speech therapy to the total school program. Supervised clinical practicum. 



DIVISION OF CURRICULUM AND INSTRU< HON IM 



I \c 121 Scnioi Scminai Speech ( Direction I ; 6 ,( 
Prerequisite Admission to leachei Kducation and 
\n overview of contemporary issues principles and i 
correction In the publi< scho led study will be given to tr* 

diagnostic enl alternative augmentative communicatioi 

liven models (Directed practicum.) 

i \c 122 Manual I inguagt foi the Deal 1 1 2 i) 

Prerequisite Admission to reachei Education and permission ••( instructor 
*. rffered on demand 

\ stud) ol the practices procedures and methods in tea< King manual 
the deal with a revievt ol the historical philosophies ana current * 
literature At thecon< lusionof the course the student will have a working ability to 
communicate with .1 manual deal individual as well as the ability to I 
children the pro* ess ol manual langua 

1 Kt J W I eaching ( hildren h ith l earning Disabilities I M-5) 

Prerequisites I \v 21 V lntrodu< tion to I earning I Usabilities and I I >\ 422, I he 
1 ea< hingol Reading; admission to I ea< her I du< ation and permission ol instnu tor 
reaching strategies for children with specific learning disabilities A focus on 
approaches, techniques, and materials with dire< ted application. 

Library Media Offerings 

[ M MM Introduction to Media Profession (2-0-2) 

An introductory course in which students examine the role, functions and services 
of different types of libraries and information centers. Emphasizes the role and 

responsibilities ot librarians media specialists. Includes also the social role ot 
libraries and library networks. I he student is gi> vn an opportunity to be invoh ed 
in public, school, and special libraries during field experience. 
LM310 Reference Sources (5-0-5) 

Study ol basic reference sources, including searching strategies. I he course has two 

phases: (1) study ^nd evaluation oi major types o\ references and information 
sources; (2) study ol specific sources ol information in elementary and secondary 
schools as well as specific sources for a subject field. Directed field experiences 

LM 320 Cataloging and Classification (5-0-5) 

Introduction to the basic principles oi cataloging and classification oi multimedia 
materials combined with practical experience. Dewev Decimal and Library of 
Congress Classification; Sears and Library of Congress Subject headings; and 
\ U K2 Both manual M\d automated methods are stressed. Problems peculiar to 
the media specialist are considered. Practical experience is also offered. 

LM 410 Media Selection (3-0-3) 

\\ inter. 

Selection of various types of media, based on fundamental principles and objec- 
ti\ es. I he course has three phases: ( 1 ) selection criteria, source lists mu\ their use in 
media selection, publishing, and order processing; (2) selection and evaluation ot 
media for children considering curncular considerations ^nd understanding of the 
media specialist's responsibilities toward guidance in media; and (3) selection and 
evaluation of media tor young adults considering curricular correlations and 
enrichment; recreational and developmental needs; young adult services ^nd 
programs. Includes field experiences. 

LM 420 Administration of Information Centers (5-0-5) 

Spring. 

Prerequisites; [ M 3(H), 310, 320, 410. 

Stud\' of organization ,^nd administration of all types of information centers 
including administering the budget, purchase of materials, personnel, circulation, 
equipment, routines and schedules, maintenance of the collection, preventive 
maintenance and minor repairs of equipment, and relations with administration 
and users will be considered. Students will examine the role of the media specialist 
in the curriculum process and media center instruction and orientation. 



194 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



School library media philosophies and educational objectives will also be exam- 
ined. Concurrent enrollment in Media Internship is recommended. 

LM 425 Media Internship (0-12-5) 

Offered on demand. Prerequisites: LM 300, 310, 320, 410, with a grade of "C" or 
higher and concurrent enrollment in LM 420. 

Supervised experience in library media center, or other appropriate setting. Stu- 
dents must complete 120 clock hours of work. Offered on a pass/fail basis. 
Application for the Internship must be made at least one quarter in advance. 

NOTE: (The following library science courses are administered by the Director of 
Library Services and are taught by professional library faculty.) 

Library Science Offerings 

LS 110 Introduction to Library Research and Materials (1-0-1) 

An orientation to the library, library terminology, search strategy formation, and 
major library aids such as the card catalog, classification and subject heading 
guides, periodical indexes and abstracts, encyclopedias, dictionaries, almanacs, 
handbooks and yearbooks, reviews, and criticisms, and biographical sources. This 
course will provide students with opportunities to learn how to access information 
in a variety of formats so that they can continue life-long learning, directed to the 
individual student's subject interest. 

LS 311 Principles of Library Research and Materials (1-0-1) 

Study of two separate but complementary aspects of library research, research 
methodology and research tools. The methodology section addresses the way in 
which a research paper is written, from the selection of a topic to the paper's final 
bibliography. The study of tools focuses on various print, non-print and on-line 
resources and services available to the student preparing a scholarly paper. Nurs- 
ing and allied health resources are emphasized. 

LS 312 Information Resources In the Humanities (1-0-1) 

Extensive study of basic and advanced reference materials and search techniques 
in the humanities. 

LS 313 Information Resources In the Social Sciences (1-0-1) 

Extensive study of basic and advanced reference materials and search techniques 
in the social sciences. 

LS 314 Information Resources In the Sciences (1-0-1) 

Extensive study of basic and advanced reference materials and search techniques 
in the sciences. 

SSC Business Education Offerings 

NOTE: The following courses are requirements of the Bachelor of Science in Education 
in Business Education offered cooperatively with Savannah State College. 

ACC 211 Principles of Accounting I (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: Math 110, BAD 201. 

The fundamental concepts and procedures of accounting are studied with empha- 
sis both on rationale and technique. The elements of accounting, the accounting 
cycle, and financial statement presentation are covered in depth for the transactions 
of a merchandising firm. Computer Aided Instruction (CAI) will be utilized 
wherever applicable. 

ACC 212 Principles of Accounting II (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: ACC 211. 

Continuation of ACC 211 with emphasis on partnership and corporate financial 

reporting. Coverage also includes basic accounting concepts in job order and 

process costing, the statement of changes in financial position and interpretation of 

financial statements. Computer Aided Instruction (CAI) will be used wherever 

appropriate. 



DIVISION OF CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 



u c KM Managerial Accounting (5-0 >) 
Prerequisites u ( 21 1 K( < 
Stud) Interpretation and analysis ol accountin] 
making pro< ess ol business and n»>t t.<i profit organizal 

it \d 2i)i Introduction to Information Systems 1 1-5) 
Prerequisite i )s \l 121 oi keyboarding proficiency 
A co n cepts and tools course includesstud) of information pn 
history; familiarization with terminals and microcomputers developii 
tor) le\ el profu ien< \ w 1 1 h .i micro based spreadsheet, word pro d til<-r 

pa< kagc 

it \i ) 22^ Business ( ommunicationj and Report IVriting (5-0-5) 
Prerequisite l NG 109 

rhe application o( bask principles ol I nglish grammai , basu report writing, and 
research techniques to presentations and written communications as demanded in 
business Che role of written communications in relation to news media enters into 
tin- >. onsideration given to communication theon 

it \n 317 Legal I in ironmenl oi Business (5-0-5) 

Vstud) ol legal rights, so< ial forces and go\ ernment regulations affe< ring business; 
an in depth study of the law ol contracts; the law ol personal propert) and 
bailments. 

BAD 320 Principles of Business Finance (5-0-5) 
Prerequisite: BA1 > 131. 

Principles/ problems/ and practices associated with the financial management ol 
business institutions; nature and types ol ecji.ii t\ financing; major types ol short- 
term and long-term debt; capitalization; financial statements/ working capital 
requirements/ reorganization; bankruptcy; methods ol intercorporate financing 

BAD 340 Principles of Marketing (5-0-5) 
Prerequisite: 1 ( 201. 

rhe distribution of goods ( <\nd services from producers to consumers/ market 
methods employed in assembling transporting storage/ sales, and risk taking; 
analysis of the commodit) . brands, sales methods and management; advertising 
plans and media. 

BAD 362 Organizational Theory and Behavior (5-0-5) 

basic principles and functions of management/ with emphasis on the process ol 
integrating people Into the work situation so thai the) work together productively 
and with economic, psychological/ and social satisfaction. 

BAD 440 Management Information Systems (5-0-5) 

[btal information system for managerial strategy, planning, and control. Informa- 
tion management, the systems approach, storage ^nd data bases, functional 
information systems, information systems development. 

BED 350 Methods of Teaching Business (5-0-5) 

Offered Winter Quarter, Odd years. 

An analysis of specialized methods used to teach business subjects on the second- 
ary level. Includes basic principles and curriculum structure of genera I and vocational 
business education. 

ECO 201 Principles of Macro-Economics (5-0-5) 

Basic economic concept, with emphasis on the role of government; national income 
and products; business cycles; money and banking; fiscal and monetary policy, and 

international trade. 

ECO 202 Principles of Micro-Economics (5-0-5) 

Basic economic concepts continued from 201. Factors oi production; supply and 
demand; determination of prices and of income; monopolies; the problem of 
economic growth; and comparative economic s\ stems. 



196 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



OSM 121 Keyboarding for Information Processing (1-2-2) 

Introductory course covering alphanumeric keyboarding skills for students who 
intend to use typewriters, microcomputers, word processors, computer terminals, 
and other types of information processing equipment. Student may take a profi- 
ciency test to exempt. 

OSM 122 Keyboarding Applications for Business (2-2-3) 
Prerequisite: keyboarding proficiency. 

For students who have had one or two semesters of high school tvpewriting (or 
OSM 121) and are able to touch type. Course covers formatting of documents, 
including letters, manuscripts, and tables. Introduction to production keyboard- 
ing. Minimum passing speed: 35 words a minute on five-minute timed writings. 

OSM 320 Advanced Keyboarding Applications (3-4-5) 

Prerequisite: OSM 122. 

Further skill development in production of office documents. Includes machine 

transcription. Minimum passing speed: 50 words per minute. 

OSM 340 Word Processing Concepts and Technique (3-4-5) 

The development of basic concepts and operational techniques on selected word 
processing units. Tvpewriting proficiency required. 

OSM 405 Information and Records Management (5-05) 

Creation, maintenance, and disposition of records including hard copy and elec- 
tronic media. Indexing rules and procedures; records management programs 
including inventory, retention and disposition schedules; vital records protection, 
the management of electronic files, micrographics, active and inactive records 
control are major components of the course. 

OSM 420 Office Information Systems (5-0-5) 

Trends and issues in office automation. A study of information processing func- 
tions focusing on the integration and management of automated office systems. The 
organizational concept; the traditional and emerging office; characteristics of major 
support systems; information /data /user interface; analysis and design; future 
office systems. 



Division of Health and Physical Education 



Faculty 

Counsil, Roger, Division Head 

Lariscy, Michael, Coordinator of Knorr, Virginia 

Physical Education Programs Koth, Andreas 

Aenchbacher, Eddie Roberts, Lynn 

Ford, Betty Tapp, Lawrence 
Jones, Lynda 

Goals and Objectives 

The mission of the Division of Health and Physical Education is to provide a range of 
academic, service and athletic programs in an intellectually, physically, and socially 
stimulating environment. To accomplish these goals, the objectives of the various units 
of the Division are: 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHER CERTIFICATION PROGRAM: 

To provide depth and breadth of content, pedagogy and practical application in the 

preparation of subject matter for both health and physical education. 

To provide knowledge of health and educational concepts and principles, and their 

applications in an educational environment and society. 

To develop competency in using the processes of health and physical education in a 

broad range of activities to include research, laboratory skills, and field experiences. 



DIVISION OF HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



fa develop a positive attitude toward health and physical education and then 
bon to partic ipate in a w holesome program »>t health enhan< ing a< tfc 

rodemonstrate the ability to teach health and physical education processes, attitudes, 
and content to learners representing a wide range of abilities from varii omu 

and ethnu ba< kgrounds 

fa gain the iu\ essar) knowledge ol the learning process and broad range ol ii 
bonaj strategies and materials with proper selection best suited for a given teaching and 
learning situation 

1 o demonstrate an understanding ol the goals and objectives ol the overall educa 
bona! system and how health and physical education relates to these broader purposes 

PHYSIC \l I Dl C \llo\ SI R\ K I PROGR \\l 

l o pro> Ide a w ide variet) of offerings that focus upon life long ph) sical activities 

fa develop knowledge 4 basic skills and appreciation ol recreational sports and 
acth ities 

1 o provide instruction which will certify and qualify students in tin- areas ol aquan< s 
and safety first aid and C PR. 

1 o pro\ ide basic instruction in personal health practices and beha\ iors. 

Illl INTRAMl RA1 PROGRAM 

1 o yvo\ ide opportunities for participation, regardless of ability, in a wide \ ariet) ol 
sports and recreationa] acth ities to the entire college communit) . 

1 o pro\ ide an opportunity to develop friendships, to increase ph) sical fitness, and to 
use leisure time wisel) 

I o foster a spirit of sportsmanship and fair play among all participants ^nd spectators. 

Mil l\ll RCOl 1 U.I All AIHI MIL PROGRAM: 

fa provide the opportunity tor student-alumni to participate in ^n intercollegiate 
athletic program. 

fa furnish a spectator sports program tor the students and general public which in 
turn will provide a public relations opportunity for the college. 

lo provide c\n environment for learning and enjoyment regardless ol whether a 
student is a participant or a spectator. 

THE COMMUNITY EDUCATION SERVICE PROGRAM: 

1 o otter a range of activities designed to appeal to the community. 

fa utilize the campus gymnasium and field facilities to enhance the community image 

of the college. 

To provide an environment of learning and enjoyment tor the participants. 

Required Activity Courses 

During the treshman\ ear, all students should take PE 117 (Basic Health) or L66(Safet) 
and First Aid) and 103, 108, 199,203,31 1, or 316 (Swimming). During the sophomore year, 

students may elect any three Physical Education activity courses. Students unable to 
participate in the regular program should plan an alternate program with the Coordina- 
tor of the Physical Education Programs. Students should note the Physical Education 
Requirements section located in the Academic Policies and Information section of the 
catalog. 

Swimming Exemption 

\ student who can show cause (a physical handicap for example) to be exempted mom 
the swimming requirement should make an appointment with the Coordinator o\ the 
Physical Education Programs. A student may request a swimming test to exempt 
swimming and to substitute another activity course through the Coordinator o\ the 
Physical Education Program. Exemption tests are administered the first two days each 
quarter. 



198 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Advisement 

Any student who declares physical education as his/her major is assigned an advisor 
who is a faculty member. A conference should be scheduled to determine any/all 
conditions and requirements the student must meet in order to complete the degree and 
certification objectives. It is the responsibility of the student to initiate and maintain the 
advisement process. 

Transfer of Courses 

Provisions for transfer of credits are delineated in the Academic Regulations section 
of the catalog. The procedure for transferring CATES courses is published in the 
Graduate section of the catalog. 

Bachelor of Science in Education in 
Health and Physical Education 

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Education with a Major in Health and Physical 
Education provides the student with a degree leading to teacher certification P-12 in the 
areas of Health and Physical Education. The program is approved by the National 
Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NC ATE) and the Georgia State Depart- 
ment of Education. Students selecting this major should seek advisement in the Division 
of Physical Education and Athletics. Students pursuing this degree should refer to the 
Teacher Certification section of the catalog to find those stipulations affecting all 
undergraduate education programs at Armstrong State College. 

Progression Requirements: 

1 . Successful completion of basic core requirements 

a. General Requirements 

b. Regents Exam 

2. Application for Admission to Major Program 

a. Departmental Advisor Assigned 

b. Program of Study Established 

3. Application for Admission to Teacher Education (2.5 G.P.A. required) 

a. Media Competency Completion 

b. September practicum 

c. Application for Student Teaching Assignment 

4. Successful Completion of Departmental Requirements 

a. All additional major courses 

b. Proficiency tests 

c. TCT 

5. Application for Graduation 

Physical Education Minor 

The minor in physical education requires 25 credit hours with grades of "C" or better. 
The student will select 25 hours from the following courses: 

1. PE 210, 216, 217, 219, 311, 413, 421, PEM 250, 251, 252, 351, 352. 

2. No more than two courses from: PE 212, 213, 214 or 215. 
See course offerings for the description of courses. 



DIVISION OF HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
IN EDUCATION IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

I lours 

\ (. ieneraJ Requirements 
i l 

l.ENG L01 102 or L92 201 01 292 
Onecoursefrom \ki 2 PHI 201 

I \l \l 101 and 220 10 

Vpproved laboratory science sequence 10 

\liM 111 

1 His 114. 11- or 192 ID 

POS 113 

! Onecoursefrom ANT 201, ECO 201, 202; SOC 201 

Area l\ 30 

1. EDN200,DRS228 PS\ L01 15 

: IPX 201 or PS> 201 5 

HIS 251 or HIS 252 5 

4. CS L15orCS L20 5 

Area V 5 

Five hours of activity courses 5 

IV Courses in the Major field 71 

1 PE 103, 1 I HI, or 316 1 

2. PE 166 2 

V PEM 250, 251,252, 253, 254, 351, 552, 353, 354, 355 4<s 

4. Hi; 260, 261, 262, 360 and HS 420 20 

C. Professional Sequence 

1. EXC 310; EDN 335, 471, 472, 473 25 

: HE 460 5 

D. Electives 8 

E. Regents' ,\nd Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 199 

Physical Education Offerings 

SPEC1 Al NOTE: 

Swimming is required of all students as part of their 6 hours of physical education. 
Students with a valid I ifeGuarding, WSI, or Open Water Diver certificate or who have 
passed the Armstrong swimming test may be exempted from the swimming require- 
ment. Students able to swim in deep water should register for P.E. 108. If in doubt as to 
proper course, consult one of the Division's swimming instructors BEFORE RIC.I^ 1 1 R- 
ING. All courses designated PEM are required o\ majors. 

PE 100 Beginning Weight Training (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Emphasis on developing physical fitness through a variety of fundamental weight 
training exercises. Introduction oi mechanical principles and techniques neces>ar\ 
for the understanding of weight training programs. Only one oi PE 100 or PE 204 
may count as an activity course toward the six hours of required physical education. 

PE 101 Lifetime Fitness (0-3-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Basic fitness concepts and their application to our everyday life. Students will 
participate in an individualized program of aerobic activity and lectures on fitness 
and nutrition. 



200 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PE 102 Team Sports (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Consists of two of the following sports: basketball, volleyball and softball. 

PE 103 Basic Swimming Skills (0-3-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. (PE 31 1 or 316 may be substituted for PE 103 or 108). 
Skills and strokes for the student unfamiliar with or afraid of the water and who 
cannot swim. Satisfies Armstrong swimming requirement. 

PE 104 Bowling (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

Basic skills in bowling. Minimum of two games required per class period at 

student's expense. Must provide own transportation. 

PE 105 Badminton (0-2-1 ) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

Basic skills in badminton. Student must provide own racquet. 

PE 106 Beginning Gymnastics (0-2-1) 

Winter. 

Fundamentals and practice in beginning tumbling and gvmnastic apparatus. 

PE 107 Trampoline (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

The teaching of the proper care and use of the trampoline. Under strict supervision, 

the student learns to perform basic skills. 

PE 108 Intermediate Swimming (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. (PE 311 or the American Red Cross W r SI course mav 
be substituted for PE 103 or 108). 

Six basic strokes, skills, endurance and knowledge pertaining to safety in, on, or 
about water. Satisfies swimming requirement. 

PE 109 Intermediate Gymnastics (0-2-1) 

Winter. Prerequisite: PE 106 or permission of instructor. 

Continuation of PE 106 with additional practice of tumbling and gymnastic appa- 
ratus. 

PE 110 Aerobic Dance (0-3-1) 

A fitness course in which the cardiovascular, muscular endurance and strength, 
flexibilitv, and bodv composition components of phvsical fitness can all be im- 
proved; a combination of exercise and dance steps (exertion and rhythmical 
movement). 

PE 115 Officiating of Football (2-2-2) 

Fall. 

Consists of a study of rules, rules interpretation, and actual experience in officiating 

intramural games, approved community recreation games, and public school 

games. Students must provide own equipment and transportation. 

Students must provide own whistles, hats and transportation to anv off-campus 

assignment. 

PE 116 Officiating of Basketball (2-2-2) 

Winter. 

Consists of a stud v of rules, rules interpretation, and actual experience in officiating 
in class games, intramural games, approved community recreation games and 
public school games. Elective credit. 

Student must provide own whistle and transportation to any off-campus assign- 
ment. 

PE 117 Basic Health (2-0-2) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

A basic course in health education with emphasis on personal health. 



DIVISION OF HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 201 



PI i is Officiating ream Spoil 

|"his course is designed to acquaint the student with the i 

Involved in off iciating a variety of team itu-s rhe student will d< 

i Fundamental understanding «<t the rules and propei applicati 

iissiH-iati'd with the following Basketball, Baseball Footbal ill and 

Volleyball 

Student must provide own equipment appropriate to th< 

foi off v ampus assignment 

pi 120 l.i// Dancing (0-2-1) 

An introduction to modern, lyrical and hip hop forms of jazz, including I 

tal tex hniques and t horeograph) 
PI 166 Community First Aid and CPR (3-0-2) 

I .ill. Winter Spi ing Summer 

rhe American Red ( rose advanced course in safet) and first aid and adult ( I'K 
Required of majors. I o re< en e a t ertifk ation t ard, students must pa) art adminis- 
trative fee to the American Red Cross 
PI 167 Community I irst Aid and stress Management Foi I he Law 

Enforcement Officer (3-1-3) 
Summer. 

1 his course is designed to pro* ide the student with American Red c ross 1 irst Aid 
and c PR Certification Stress management skills ol particular significance to the 
law enforcement officer will be an integral part of the course. Students will be 
required to pay an administrative fee to the American Red c ross. 

PE 199 Basic Water Safety (0-2-1) 

I his course is designed to create an awareness of causes ,\nd prevention of water 
accidents, to develop a desire to be sate, ,\nd to encourage health and sate water 
recreation I he foCUS is on personal and community water safety. No swimming 

skills required. 

PE 200 Archery (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

Basic skills in archery tor recreational use. Students must provide own arm and 

fingerguards. 

PE201 Elementary Tennis (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. Summer. 

Basic skills in tennis. Student must provide own racquet and onv can of new tennis 

balls. 

PE202 Racquetball (0-2-1) 

Designed to develop enthusiasm and appreciation for the game of racquetball. 
Course content will include strokes, Strategy, forms of play, rules, equipment. 
safety and etiquette. Classes held off campus. Students must provide transporta- 
tion. Additional fee is required. 

PE 203 Beginning Scuba (0-3-1) 

Prerequisite: Tread 10 minutes, swim 200 yards any st\ le. 

Equips student to engage in beginning recreational scuba diving activities in local 
aquatic environments, [bpics covered include: adapting to the underwater world, 
underwater communications, dive planning, diving equipment, boat diving, health 
tor diving, dive tables, marine life identification, and the underwater environment. 
Additional fee is required. 

PE 204 Advanced Weight Training (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: PE 100 or permission of instructor. 
Emphasis on continued development of physical fitness through a variety of 
advanced weight training exercises. Improvement of maximal muscular strength 
and endurance in the main muscle groups of the body through progressive 
resistance exercises. Only one o\ PE 100 or PL 204 may count as an activity course 
toward the six hours oi required physical education. 



202 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PE 205 Folk Square, Social Dancing (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. 

Instruction and practice in many forms of folk, square, and social dancing. 

PE 206 Beginning Modern Dance (0-2-1) 

Fall. 

Introduction to the art of modern dance. Includes technique, exercise, basic impro- 
visation, dance positions, and locomotor movement. 

PE 208 Golf (0-2-1) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

Basic techniques and instruction for the beginning golfer. Minimum of 9 holes of 
golf must be played outside of class at student's expense. Must provide 12 shag balls 
for class. 

PE 209 Intermediate Modern Dance (0-2-1) 

Winter. Prerequisite: PE 206 or permission of the instructor. 

A continuation of PE 206 with emphasis on dynamics, composition, and choreog- 
raphy. 

PE 210 Prevention and Treatment of Athletic Injuries (2-1-2) 

Winter. 

Theory and practice of caring for and preventing injuries relating to a variety of 
sports. Students required to assist in laboratory experiences with treating and 
preventive training through the athletic, intramural or physical education pro- 
grams. Student must provide own athletic tape. 

PE 212 Coaching Football (3-0-2) 

Fall. 

Instruction and practice in fundamental skills and team play, coaching courses is 
required of majors. Minimum of two games must be scouted at student's expense. 

PE 213 Coaching Basketball (3-0-2) 

Winter. 

Instruction and practice in fundamental skills and team play, emphasizing meth- 
ods and drills used by leading coaches. One of the coaching courses is required of 
majors. Minimum of two games must be scouted at student's expense. 

PE 214 Coaching Baseball and Softball (3-0-2) 

Spring. 

Instruction and practice in fundamental skills and team play emphasizing methods 
and drills used by leading coaches. One of the coaching courses is required of 
majors. Minimum of two games must be scouted at student's expense. 

PE 215 Coaching Volleyball and Soccer (3-0-2) 

Spring. 

Introduction to the rules and fundamental skills of volleyball and soccer. Indi- 
vidual development and application of successful coaching methods. Coaching 
methods will include acquisition of sound organizational practices and under- 
standing of various coaching types. 

PE 216 Basic Games (2-0-1) 

Spring. 

Designed to acquaint student with the various categories of games, the appropri- 
ateness for each type of various age levels, proper progressions, and the best ways 
to use games teach physical skills, emotional and social skills, and actual sports 
skills. 

PE 217 Techniques of Dance (2-0-1) 

Winter. 

Overview of the art of dance and its various categories. Stresses similarities and 
differences in form, technique and history of the ballet modern dance, jazz dance, 
ballroom dance, square dance, aerobic dance and folk dance with emphasis on 
teaching and techniques. 



DIVISION OF HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 203 



PI 219 rechnlgues of Safeti In Gymnastics (0-2 I) 

\\ intei Prerequisite I'l 106 

i ourM.* designed to give majors thorough understands 

spotting in gviun.istus to assure maximum s,ilcl\ f « • r Ir.iri • 

teaching progresMons and lead-up skills 

PI 220 Principle* ol Sports I raiitfosj (2-1 2) 

Stud) ol thebasu prin< iples, methods and i hara< teristi 

ol sports Students will develop ind participate In i varietj oi trainin] 

nutritional program! used in sport settings 

PI MM Psycho-Soda! Upecta of Sports (5-0-5) 

Stud) ol the re aea n h rele\ ant to sports behavior and perfoi uumce I he student will 
be provided with knowledge about various psycho-social factors and influei 
gports settings 

PI 111 I [fegtuid l raining (1-2-2) 

P rere q uisite American Red ( rose Standard I Irst Aid and t PR certification 500 
yard continuous swim and profi< ienc) in basu water skills, 
rhis course parallels the certification qualifications tor the American Red <- roes 
1 ifeguard 1 raining course, covering such topics as: recognizing and responding to 
aquatic mishaps: pool health! sanitation and management; spinal injury manage- 
ment 1 imed sm ims required to pass. 

PE 31b Swimming Methods and Techniques (2-2-2) 

Prerequisite: Minimum 17 years old, current Safet) , I irsl Aid, and c PR 
[his course parallels tin- certification qualifications for American Red C ross Water 
Safety Instructor, covering the methods ol teaching Infant and Pro-School Aquatics, 
\\ hales I ales, the seven levels ol "learn to swim program," as well as Basic Water 
Safetj Emergenc) Water Safet} . IHSE and Safety I raining for S\* im t oa< hes. 

PE 320 Health and Physical Education for the Elementary School Teacher (5-0-5) 

Winter Prerequisite: Admission to leather Education. 

I heor\ and current practice in the teaching of health ,\nd physical education at the 
elementary school level. Designed to meet the requirement for elementary certifi- 
cation. Directed field experience included. 

PE 345 Athletic Injuries I (3-4-5) 

Introduction to the assessment, care mmA prevention of lower extremity injuries. 
Specifically, sports related injuries to feet, toes, knee, lower leg, thigh, hip ,\n<A 
pelvis will be studied 

PE 346 Athletic Injuries II (3-4-5) 

Prerequisite: PE J45 or permission of instructor. 

Introduction to the assessment, care and prevention ol upper extremity injuries. 

Specifically, sports related injuries to the axial skeleton, shoulder girdle, elbow, 
wrist, hand and fingers, and injuries to the solid and hollow organs will be studied. 

PE 347 Therapeutic Modalities (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: PE 345 or permission of the instructor. 

An investigation of the theoretical and technological basis of sports injury rehabili- 
tation, therapeutic modalities and taping techniques associated with athletic injuries. 
Each student is responsible tor his/her own transportation to off-campus sites and 
the procurement of taping suppli< 

PE 348 Seminar in Athletic Training (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 
Presentation and discussion by faculty and students of research and topics oi 

current interest in the field of athletic training. 

PE 364 Physical Education for the Exceptional Child (3-2-5) 

Student is introduced to methods oi identifying and programming for the excep- 
tional child. 



204 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PE 400 Physical Activity and the Older Adult (3-4-5) 

This course is concerned with the impact of fitness activities in the lives of older 
adults. The focus is upon the physiological and psychological benefits associated 
with leading an active life and their effects upon the quality and quantity of life. 

PE 421 Management of Sports Programs (5-0-5) 

Designed to apply principles of management to a variety of sports settings. 
Management applications for school, municipal, and proprietary sports organiza- 
tions will be examined. 

PE 431 Practicum in Athletic Training I (V-V-(l-3)) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor or PEM 252. To become familiar with the 
daily procedures of the treatment center and to learn the basic skills associated with 
athletic training. Orientation to athletic training through 150 hours of supervised 
observation in various activities associated with athletic training. 

PE 432 Practicum in Athletic Training II (V-V-(l-3)) 

Prerequisite: PEA 431. 

Emphasis in the areas of evaluation and rehabilitation of athletic and sport injuries. 

Supervised clinical experience through 150 hours of practical field work. 

PE 433 Practicum in Athletic Training III (V-V-U-3)) 

Prerequisite: PEA 432. 

Emphasis on lower extremity modalities. Supervised clinical experience through 

150 hours of practical field work. 

PE 434 Practicum in Athletic Training IV (V-V-Q-3)) 

Prerequisite: PEA 433. 

Emphasis on upper body modalities. Supervised clinical experience through 150 

hours of practical field work. 

PE 435 Practicum in Athletic Training V (V-V-Q-3)) 

Prerequisite: PEA 434. 

Supervision of conditioning and rehabilitation programs. Supervised clinical expe- 
rience through 150 hours of practical field work. 

PE 436 Practicum in Athletic Training VI (V-V-d-3)) 

Prerequisite: PEA 435. 

Assuming a leadership role in a practical phase of athletic training. Supervised 

clinical experience through 150 hours of practical field work. 

PE 437 Athletic Training Internship I (V-V-U-5)) 

Prerequisite: PEM 352 and PEA 436. 

Assist in assessment, prevention, and treatment of injuries. The internship in 
athletic training allows students to broaden their experience and to complete 200 
hours required by the National Athletic Trainers Association (NATA) for certifica- 
tion. 

PE 438 Athletic Training Internship II (V-V-U-5)) 

Prerequisite: PEA 437. 

To assume a role as a lead trainer for emergency procedures and assessment. 
Continuation of Athletic Internship I. Students are required to complete 200 hours 
of service. 

PE 439 Athletic Training Internship III (V-V-U-5)) 

Prerequisite: PEA 438. 

To perfect advanced skills and techniques of athletic training while assuming 
responsibility for the management and operation of a clinical setting. Continuation 
of Athletic Internship II. Students are required to complete 200 hours of service. 

PEM 250 Introduction to Physical Education (5-0-5) 

An introduction to the subdisciplines of physical education. Study will include a 
survey of historical foundations, relationships between health and physical educa- 
tion, professional skills, and career opportunities. 



DIVISION OF HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION MM 



PI \i l n inti.inun..is md Recreation (9-0 \) 

I his t win i«d to prepare il«< student toorj 

i.il .nul re< reational i lementar) and •••■> ondai 

college level and for the communit) Vctiviti< 

Students are required t" partii ipate in field experiem i 

portation must i>,- supplied in tin - itudent 

PI \i Human taatont) .nul Klneaiolog) In Phytic*! I ducition (5-0-5) 

\ Nin\»-\ o( selected systems i»i the bod) and tin- analysis <•( movement and 
applu atjon »>i me* hanical prin< iples in physical education activit) 

PI \i Individual and Dual Sporti I M \) 

Designed to acquaint student with the various Individual and dual sports IH«- 
student will analyze and gain practice in teaching activities such as archery, 
badminton, bk ycling, bowling, fencing, fitness, golf, hiking, backpacking, ra< ketball, 
tennis and weight training 

I'l \1 2^1 Team Sports lechniques (3-4-5) 

I designed foi tin- enhancement of sports skills and for tin- anal) sis and pra< ace In 
teaching these skills 1 earn sports include: basketball, field hockej . flag tag foot' 
bail, soccer, softball, speedball and volleyball. 

PEM 351 Measurement and Evaluation In Health, Physical Education (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Math 220. 

1 ectures, laboratory and field experience in the development, evaluation and 
application o( tests m health and physical education. Students will learn to utilize 
computer software tor instructional and administrative purpose 

PEM 552 Physiology of Exercise (4-2-5) 
Prerequisite: PI M 252. 

A stud) ot bod) s\ stems ^nd their reactions to various types m^\ levels ol exercise. 
Stud) will include parts and functions of systems most involved in the exercise 
process. Students will investigate various components of physical fitness, weight 
control, and exorcist' prescription. 

PEM 353 Elementary School Physical Education (4-2-5) 

rheory and current practice in the teaching of elementary physical education 
including developmental tumbling and gymnastics, basic movement patterns, 
fundamental and creative rhythmic activities, activities related to health- fitness 
and basic skill pattern development. Multicultural considerations in planning and 
implementing adequate elementary physical education programs to meet the 
needs and interests ot all students will be explored. Directed field experience 
included. 

PEM 354 Middle School Physical Education (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: PEM 353 ^nd Admission to Ieacher Education. 

rheory ^nd current practice in the teaching of middle school physical education 
including physical fitness concepts and activities, rhythmic >.md dance activities, 
individual/partner/group games, lead-up and modified individual dual team 
sports. Multicultural considerations in planning and implementing adequate middle 
school physical education programs to meet the needs and interests of all students 
will be explored. Directed field experience included. 

PEM 355 Secondary School Physical Education (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: PEM 354 and Admission to Ieacher Education. 

The study of curricular methods, media and assessment of secondary physical 

education programs as they apply to the developmental lev els of the secondarv age 
student. Multicultural considerations in planning and implementing adequate 
secondary physical education programs to meet the needs and interests of all 
students will be explored. Directed field experience included 

PEM 410 Kinesiology (5-0-5) 
Prerequisite: PEM 252. 

Analysis of human sports performances using physiological principles and the 
physical laws of motion. 



206 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



PEM 413 



PEM 425 



PEM 430 



Special Topics In Physical Education (5-0-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: PEM 351. 

Research methods in health and physical education. Allows students an opportu- 
nity for in depth pursuit into areas of their interests. Open to majors only. 

Law in Sports and Physical Activity (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the major issues and legal 

principles involved in the realm of physical education, athletics and recreational 

sports. 

Facility Management and Operation (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Analysis of management competencies necessary to operate physical education, 
sports, recreational and athletic facilities. Conceptual and technical aspects of 
planning and design are introduced. 




208 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



SCHOOL OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS 

Repella, James, Dean 
Connor, Sara, Assistant to the Dean 

Goals and Objectives 

The faculty of the School of Health Professions believes that the development of the 
student as an individual is a primary objective of a college education. The central role and 
function of the School of Health Professions is to provide an appropriate academic, 
intellectual, and professional milieu to develop the skills required for a high level of 
professional competence. This includes the development of intellectual and physical 
competencies; personal values and beliefs; leadership abilities; a sense of integrity, self- 
worth, and self- reliance; and a sense of responsibility toward the community and society. 
To achieve these objectives, the goals of the School are: 

To prepare graduates who possess, at the appropriate level, the competencies re- 
quired in their professional endeavors, and whose practice is compatible with the ethics 
of democratic humanistic philosophy; 

To prepare an educational environment which will motivate the student to develop a 
life-long commitment to learning and services; stimulate creativity, flexibility, and 
independence of thought and judgement within acceptable professional and humanistic 
constraints; and foster appreciation for scholarship and critical reasoning; 

To develop the leadership abilities of students so they may function effectively as 
leaders both in their professions and in their communities; To anticipate and to identify 
problems and needs and to encourage change and open-mindedness in finding solutions 
through appropriate research. 

To develop the School as a planning and resource center for professional growth and 
community service; 

To complement other Schools of the College by providing programs of a uniquely 
professional character which enhance the educational opportunities of Armstrong State 
College. 

Organization and Degrees 

The School of Health Professions includes the departments of Associate Degree 
Nursing; Baccalaureate Degree Nursing; Dental Hygiene; Health Science; Radiologic 
Technologies; Respiratory Therapy; and the degree program in Medical Technology. 
The following degree programs are offered within the School: 
Associate in Science in: 

Dental Hygiene 

Nursing 

Radiologic Technologies 

Respiratory Therapy 
Bachelor of Health Science 
Bachelor of Science in: 

Dental Hygiene Education 

Medical Technology 

Nursing 
Additional degree programs, those at the masters level, are delineated in the 
graduate section of this catalog. 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE NURSING 



Associate Degree Nursing 

I M ult\ 

is I v.mn.i I tepartmenf I lead 

c aldwell, I \ a Reill) Nam \ 

c lark Sandra I itus. l Uzabeth 

(. onnoi Sara Williamson, fane 

■rii Marsha w right fanet 

Pruden I mel 

1 In- \smh iate I tegree Nursing Program pro\ idea tin- student with the opportunity to 
obtain a genera] education and to stud) nursing at the college level [he program is 
appnn ed b) the ( leorgia Hoard of Nursing and accredited In the National I eague for 
Nursing (NLN) ( Iraduates are eligible to take the National c ouiu U oi State hoards ( >t 
Nursing I icensure 1 xamination i\c I l \-K\i tin licensure to practice as Regisfc 
Nurses Graduates must meet all legal requirements tor licensure as established by the 
State Board ot Nursing. Student nurses participate in nursing clinical experiences at local 
hospitals m^\ other community agencies ^nd are responsiole tor providing their own 
transportation. 

The Georgia Board of Nursing Legal Requirements 

Ihe Georgia Hoard of Nursing lias the authority to refuse to grant a license to an 

applicant upon a finding by the hoard that the applicant has hem convicted of ^n\ 
felony, crime involving moral turpitude, or crime violating a federal or state law 

relating to controlled substances or dangerous drugs in the courts of this state, am 
other state, territory, or country, or in the courts of the United States, including but 

not limited to a plea of nolo contendere entered to the charge 

Progression Requirements 

For progression through the Associate Degree Nursing Program, the following must 
he maintained: 

1. Natural science courses (CHE 201; ZOO 208, ZOO 209, BIO 210) (See "Limits on 
Admission to Health Professions Programs, j*V in the "Admissions" section of this 
catalog tor the policy regarding the repeat of science cours 

a. A grade of C or above is required tor ZOO 20<S c\nd 20 c >. 

b. A grade of D or above is required for CHE 201 and BIO 210. Only one D will 
be allowed. 

2. Nursing cour- 

a. A grade oi C or above is required in each nursing cow - 

b. A student who must repeat a course will be subject to availability ot space in 
the subsequent course. 

c. Only one repeat in a nursing course will be allowed. A student who tails a 
nursing course may repeat this course. An additional failure in this nursing 
course or any other nursing course will result in dismissal and the student 
will be ineligible for readmission to the program. 

3. Grade Point Average: 

An overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 is required to remain in the 
program. 

4. Regents' Exam 

All students must have passed the Regents' Exam before entering their last 
nursing course. 
3. CPR Certification 

All students are required to be certified in Basic Life Support (adult and child) 
prior to entering NUR 110 and must remain certified throughout the program. 



210 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Insurance 

To meet contractual obligations with the cooperating clinical agencies, the Department 
requires students to submit a completed health history and evidence of hospitalization 
insurance prior to the first day of class. Once admitted, all students must obtain nursing 
liability insurance. Nursing liability and hospitalization insurance must remain current 
throughout the program. 

Advanced Placement 

The first two nursing courses, Nursing 1 10 and 111, may be exempted by examination 
with credit awarded. The examination may be taken only once. Medical corpsmen and 
licensed practical nurses who have graduated and/or practiced in a clinical setting 
within the past two years are eligible to sit for this examination. Proof of practice is 
required. Successful completion of the examination does not guarantee admission into 
the program. Students who successfully challenge NUR 110 and NUR 111, will be 
required to take NUR 113 and complete all prerequisite courses prior to entering 
NUR 114. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF ASSOCIATE 
IN SCIENCE IN NURSING 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 53 

Area 1 10 

1. ENG 101, 102 10 

Area II 5 

1. MAT 101 5 

Area III 15 

1. HIS 251 or 252 5 

2. POS113 5 

3. PSY101 5 

Area IV 20 

1. ZOO 208, 209 10 

2. BIO 210, CHE 201 10 

AreaV 3 

1. PE 117 or 166 and one activity course or three activity courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 55 

1. NUR 110, 111, 114, 113, (for advanced placement students only) 

210, 211, 212, 213 55 

C. Regents' and National Standardized Nursing Examinations 

TOTAL 108 

Curriculum Design 

Prerequisites 

ZOO 208 5 

CHE 201 5 

MAT 101 5 

15 
1st Quarter 

NUR 110 6 

ZOO 209 5 

ENG 101 5 

16 



ASSOCIATE DEGREE NURSING 211 



2ml Uu.ii tei 
\l K 111 

BIO 210 

I \c. 102 
♦\l R113 

mJ Quaxtei 

\l R 111 

PS> i,)i 

PI 117 of loo 

15 

4th Quarter 

\l R210 

HIS 251 or 252 

n u nvm 1 

14 
5th or 6th Quarter 

NUR 211 1 1 

POS IP 5 

16 
3th or bth Quarter 

\l R212 ^ 

\L R213 

15 
*1 tw \d\ anced Placement Students Only 

Offerings 

NUR 110* Nursing to Meet Basic Needs I (3-9-6) 

Fall, Winter. Prerequisites: Admission to the nursing program, ZOO 208 C 1 1 
MAT 101, eligibility tor ENG 101. Corequisite: ZOO 209. 

Ihis course introduces the conceptual framework of the nursing program with 
emphasis on basic human needs, growth and development, biopsychosocial man, 
teaching I learning and roles of the nurse. The nursing process is used to promote 
adaptation with problems related to hygiene, activiU exercise, safety, elimina- 
tion, oxygenation, nutrition and sexuality. Principles of pharmacology and 
administration of non-parenteral medications are presented. Concurrent clinical 
learning experience s are provided in extended care facilities and acute care hospitals. 

NUR 111* Nursing to Meet Basic Needs II (3-12-7) 

Winter, Spring. Prerequisites: NUR 1 10, A '• requisite: BIO 210. 

A continuation of \L'R 1 10. This course introduces fluid electrolytes, rest comfort, 
emotional safety, love belonging and self-esteem. The nursing process is used for 
patients undergoing surgery with emphasis upon nursing skills, patient teaching and 
interpersonal relationships. Concurrent clinical learning exp eri ence s are provided 
in acute care hospitals. 

NUR 113* Transition to Associate Degree Nursing (2-0-2) 

Winter, Spring. Prerequisites: Successful Exemption of NUR 1 10 and 111. 

Corequisite: BIO 210. 

This course is designed for the advanced placement student. Content includes 
review of dosage calculation and introduction to the conceptual framework with 
emphasis on nursing process, roles of the AD nurse, growth and development, 

communication and teaching/learning. 



212 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



NUR 114* Concepts of Adult Nursing I (5-9-8) 

Fall, Spring. Prerequisites: NUR 111, or NUR 113. Co-requisite: PSY 101. 
Basic human needs are evolved into the concepts of oxygenation, metabolism, and 
perception /coordination. These concepts focus on common health problems in which 
there is a maladaptive response of the body's ability to meet its oxygen, nutritional, 
elimination, and activity needs. Physical assessment skills are included. 

NUR 210* Concepts of Adult Nursing II (5-9-8) 

Fall, Winter. Prerequisite: NUR 114. Corequisite: HIS 251/252. 
The second quarter of study of the physically ill adult. Basic human needs are 
evolved into the concepts of inflammation /immunity, perception /coordination and 
metabolism. These concepts focus on common health problems in which there is a 
maladaptive response of the body's ability to protect itself from physiological harm 
or meet metabolic and sensory needs. Rehabilitative aspects of care expand the 
provider and teacher roles. 

NUR 211* Concepts of Advanced Nursing (5-18-11) 

Fall, Spring. Prerequisite: NUR 210 Corequisite: POS 113. 

The third quarter of study of the physically ill adult. The concepts of oxygenation, 
metabolism, inflammation /immunity and perception/coordination provide the basis 
for study of the critical care aspects of nursing. The student develops beginning skills 
as coordinator of care for patients with multiple needs. Transition from the role of 
student to practitioner, leadership skills and trends/issues are emphasized. Concur- 
rent clinical learning experiences are provided in acute care hospitals. 

NUR 212* Nursing in the Maternal-Child Continuum (6-9-9) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: NUR 210. Corequisite: NUR 213. 
This course concentrates on the experience of the childbearing family /developing 
child as they impact upon the health care system. Emphasized is the use of the nursing 
process to promote adaptation during the stages of childbearing and into the life cycle 
from birth through adolescence. The teaching /learning interaction and developmen- 
tal appropriateness of care are additional foci. Concurrent clinical learning experiences 
are provided on maternity and pediatric units in acute care hospitals. 

NUR 213* Mental Health-Psychiatric Nursing (3-9-6) 

Fall, Winter, Spring. Prerequisite: NUR 210. Corequisite: NUR 212. 
This course focuses on the development of self-awareness and on the therapeutic 
use of self in assisting man to achieve mental health. The nursing process is used for 
the patient with problems of psychosocial adaptation. Examined are therapeutic 
communication skills, teaching /learning, developmental level and the roles of the 
psychiatric nurse. Concurrent clinical learning experiences are provided in a 
variety of community/mental health facilities. 
* Course cycle is under review and is subject to change. 



Baccalaureate Degree Nursing 

Faculty 

* Buck, Marilyn, Department Head 

Conway, Marian 

Dunn, Barbara 

Dutko, Kathy 

Hart, Marcella * 

Keller, Carola 

Levett, Nettie * 

Massey, Carole 

Miller, Mary 

* Graduate Faculty 

The Armstrong State College Department of Baccalaureate Nursing offers entering 
freshmen, transfer students, and Registered Nurses the opportunity to earn a Bachelor of 
Science in Nursing Degree. The American Nurses Association (ANA) and the National 



Neuman, Bonnie 
Powell, Catharine 
Repella, James 
Roesel, Rosalyn 
Silcox, Elaine 
Stern, Camille 
Taggart, Helen 
Tallev, Brenda 



BACCALAUREATE DEGREE NURSING 



I eagliefoi NuiMngiNI \l hawadoptrd a position statement i ailing tin tin- h.i. I .il.itir •■ 

ate degree in nursing as tlu- academic preparation foi professional nui.ni/, pra 
Graduates are prepared to provide comprehensive nursing care for people in a 
settings rhe BSN degree also provides the foundation for graduate education in nui 

rhe program is approved by the i Board of Nursing and is hilly accredited b) 

the National League foi Nursing (Nl N) Graduates who are not alread) RNsn 
all legal requirements foi licensure as established b) the State Board ol Nursing in ordei 
to be eligible to take tin- National ( ounril l icensure I lamination i\( I l \ RN) foi 
licensure as a Registered Nurse (RN) 

The Georgia Board of Nursing Legal Requirements 

rhe Georgia Board ol Nursing has the authority to refuse to grant .1 license to an 
applicant upon a rinding bj the board that the applicant has been convicted of an) fell 
crime involving moral turpitude, or crime violating a federal or state law relating to 
controlled substances 01 dangerous drugs in the courts ol tins state, an) other state, 
territon or country/ or in the courts ol the l nited States, including but not limited to a 
pica ol nolo contendere entered to the charge. 

Progression Requirements 

l 01 the generic Bachelor ol Science program: 

1 \ ( 01 better must be earned in each science course (see School ol Health 
Professions poliq regarding repeat of science courses, p. 

2. A **( or better must be earned in each nursing course. 

) Students who earn less than a "C" in a nursing course must apply for readmission 
to the nursing major. It readmitted, the course may be repeated at its next offering 
on a space available basis I his course may be taken concurrently with a non- 
sequential course. No more than onv nursing course may be repeated. 
\n overall grade-point a\ erage (GPA) of 2.0 is required to remain in the nursing 
program. 
-indents must maintain a current health history record throughout the program. 

6. Liability, CPR certification and health insurance must be maintained while in 
program. 

7. The Registered Nurse may validate BSN 310, 334, 335, 350, 422, 423 through 
written examinations. No more than one-fourth of the degree requirements may 
be taken by correspondence, extension, or examination. All required science 
courses must be completed before enrollment in BSN 433 and/or BSN 43b. (For 
further information see BSN Department) 

8. All students must have passed the Regents Exam before entering their last 
quarter. 

9. If a student does not matriculate each quarter, excluding Summer Quarter, the 
student must apply for readmission to the College c\nd to the Department (see 
Readmission pag< 

10. Failure to comply with any oi the above requirements while in the nursing 
program constitutes grounds for dismissal from the program. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE IN NURSING 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course selected from: ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; PHI 201 

Area II 20 

1. CHE 121, 122* 10 

2. MAT 101, 220 10 



214 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Area III 25 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192 10 

2. POS 113 and HIS 251 or 252 10 

3. PSY101 5 

Area IV 30 

1. BIO 210; PSY 295; SOC 201; ZOO 208, 209, 215 30 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 117 or 166 and 103 or 108 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 82 

1. BSN 231, 310, 320, 334, 335, 336 or 339, 340, 350, 422, 423, 432, 

433,436 82 

C. Courses in Allied Fields 10 

1. Electives 10 

D. Regents' and Exit Examination 

Total 193 
^Students who have already completed an approved Area II lab science sequence may- 
take CHE 201 to meet the prerequisite for ZOO 208. Associate degree RNs and others with 
Associate Degrees in the health professions who were required to take CHE 201 may use 
CHE 201-CHE 122 in Core Area II. 

Curriculum Design 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall 

ENG101 5 

CHE 121 5 

MAT 101 5 

PE 1 

16 
Winter 

ENG102orl92 5 

CHE 122 5 

HIS 114 or 191 5 

PE 103 or 108 1 

16 
Spring 

ENG201or292 5 

HIS 115 or 192 5 

ZOO 208 5 

PE 117 or 166 2 

17 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall 

PSY 101 5 

ZOO 209 5 

Area I Elective 5 

PE 1 

16 
Winter 

BIO 210 5 

MAT 220 5 



BACCALAUREATE DEGREE NURSING 215 



PI 



Spring 

I'M 295 
BSN 231 
ZCX 

15 
|l NIOR Y\ \K 

Fall 

BSN 
BSN ! 

•Pol Sd \m Hi- 

17 

Winter 
••BSN (34 

BSN WO 

1 lective, or 

•♦BSN 135 6 

16 or 17 
Spring 

BSN 

•♦BSN J50 or BSN 423 

-HA *35 or 

Elective 3 

14 or 15 
SENIOR YEAR 

Fall 

**BS\ 350 or BSN 423 b 

"BSN422 6 

BSN 432 oi 

Elective 

17 
Winter 

BSN 433 or BSN 436 10 or 12 

Elective or BSN 432 3 

15 or 17 
Spring 

BSN 433 or BSN 436 10 or 12 

10 or 12 

*By State law, each student who receives a diploma or certificate from a school 
supported by the State of Georgia must demonstrate proficiency in United States History 
and Government and Georgia History and Government. Students at Armstrong State 

College may demonstrate such proficienc\ by successfully completing examinations for 
which credit will he awarded for Political Science 1 13 c\nd History 251 or 2^2. It students 
elect to take courses instead of challenging them, students will be responsible for 
arranging their schedules to complete both of the courses before graduation. 

** Although clinical laboratory hours are computed on the basis oi h hours per week; 
actual clinical laboratory hours are 12 hours even other week. 



216 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Offerings 

BSN 231 A Conceptual Framework for Professional Nursing (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: PSY 101, SOC 201. 

This course is designed for beginning students of professional nursing. The concep- 
tual framework of the baccalaureate curriculum is examined. Major emphasis is 
placed on an introduction to the concepts of Person, Environment, Health, and 
Nursing. 

BSN 310 Concepts of Nursing Practice (4-9-7) 

Prerequisites: BSN 231, PSY 295, all required science courses. 
This introductory course provides the foundational knowledge for clinical nursing. 
Emphasis is placed on concepts for professional nursing practice that will assist 
individuals to meet health needs. The student assumes the role of professional 
nurse by implementing various cognitive, psychomotor, and interpersonal skills to 
promote positive adaptation. 

BSN 320 Health Appraisal of the Individual (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: ZOO 215, BSN 231 or permission of department head. 
This is a beginning course in physical assessment which provides knowledge and 
experience for the nursing student and interested health professional, with a focus 
on appraisal of the individual throughout the lifecycle. Emphasis is placed upon 
understanding of physical assessment skills appropriate for nursing. Course didac- 
tic and laboratory components focus on normal findings of the physical appraisal 
and common deviations from normal are addressed as necessary- 

BSN 334 Health Restoration of Adults I** (4-6-6) 

Prerequisite: BSN 310, 320. 

This course provides students with the opportunity to assist adult individuals cope 
with alterations in the ability to meet human needs related to the concepts of 
oxygenation, fluid and electrolytes, perception and coordination, and metabolism. 
Clinical experiences are provided in secondary health care settings. 

BSN 335 Promotion of Psychosocial Adaptation** (4-6-6) 

Prerequisites: BSN 310, 320. 

This course is designed to assist students to promote positive adaptive behavior of 
individuals and families with psychosocial problems through the use of the nursing 
process. Trends in mental health, legal issues and the role of the nurse in the 
psychiatric setting are examined. Clinical experiences are provided in secondary 
health care settings and community mental health facilities. 

BSN 336 Leadership In Nursing Care Management (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: BSN 310. 

Management and leadership principles are introduced and applied to nursing. The 
focus of this course is on the leadership role of the professional nurse in the 
management of health care. 

BSN 339 Topics In Professional Nursing (3-0-3) 

Prerequisites: BSN 231 and RN licensure. 

This course builds upon BSN 231. Major emphasis is placed on the discussion and 
application of selected concepts and theories that underlie the practice of profes- 
sional nursing. 

BSN 340 Nursing and Family Health (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: BSN 310 or permission of department head. 

This course is designed to explore the family as a biopsychosocial unit of a multi- 
cultural society. Internal and external variables affecting the health and adaptation 
of the family system are considered. The nursing process is utilized as a framework 
to assess structural and functional needs, plan nursing interventions, and develop 
outcome criteria. 

BSN 350 Nursing and the Childbearing Family** (4-6-6) 

Prerequisites: BSN 334, 340. 

Using the developmental approach, this course focuses on health promotion and 
restoration of the childbearing family. The nursing process is utilized to assess 
health needs and promote positive adaptation. Clinical learning experiences are 



BACCALAUREATE DEGREE NURSING 



BSN 122 Health Restoration ol tdults II** (4-6-6) 

rhis course provides students with the opportunity tosssun ■ 

ship role in the management >>f nui I adult mdi\ iduals and thru fsmilies 

whoanfexpeneiu un; nuiladaptu «* responses rt-latrd to * on >; in the 

ability tomeetbask human needs c linical experiences are provided ii 

health >. are settings 

I5s\ 123 Health Restoration of the Child** (4-6-6) 

Prerequisites BSN 

rhe student uses the nursing priness as a problem soh 

children experienc ing alterations in theii ability to meet human needs from it 

to adolest ern e ^ linical experien< es are pro> ided in se< ondar) i .» ri- and i ominu> 

nity settings 

BSN 432 Nursing Research (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites I hree clinical Nursing courses and \l.\ I 22o 
1 his course fcx uses on tin- research process from problem identifk ationto< ommu- 
nication ol results I hi- evolution ol nursing research is examined [he role thai 
clinical nursing research plays in the impro\ emenl of the quality <>t t are is empha- 
sized 
l>s\ 433 Nursing M^d Community Health (5-15-10) 
Prerequisites BSN *20, WO, 350, 422, 423 

I his course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and opportunity 
to utilize the nursing process to assist clients to attain their maximum level >»r 
wellness through the promotion and maintenance ol health and the prevention ot 
disease l he student functions as a beginning member ol the interdisciplinary 

health care team to plan and provide comprehensive nursing care in selected 
community settings. 
BSN 436 Professional Nursing Practicum (4-24-12) 

Prerequisites: BSN 520, 340, 550,422,423 

I his course pro\ ides the opportunity tor students to synthesize knowledge from 

the liberal arts, sciences, and nursing as a basis tor professional nursing practice 
Students practice the leadership role ot the professional nurse in assessing, plan- 
ning, implementing and evaluating nursing care in a selected clinical setting. 
Seminar sessions are provided tor students to share experiences and to discuss 
trends and issues which influence change in professional nursing practice. 

BSN 360 Issues In Gerontological Nursing (3-0-3) 

Prerequisites PSY 101,SOC201, BSN 310, or permission of department 
Application of the nursing process to the older adult population is the focus o\ this 
course. The emphasis is on promotion oi health among the population in order to 
foster successful aging through positive adaptation. The student will explore 
nursing strategies which promote the health of older adults. 

BSN 450 Health Restoration of Individuals and Families Experiencing Critical 

Illness (2-3-3) 

Prerequisite: BSN 422 or permission of department head. 

This course provides the opportunity for students to synthesize knowledge from 
the liberal arts, sciences, .\nd nursing to assist in the promotion of positive adapta- 
tion of individuals and families experiencing multisystem failure. Critical thinking 
and problem solving opportunities from a nursing perspective are provided in 
selected critical care settings. 

BSN 460 Independent Study (V-V-(l-3)) 

Offered on demand. 

Prerequisite: Senior status or permission of BSN department. 

The student, in consultation with the professor, will select the topic for supervised 

independent study. The student will submit an independent study proposal prior 

to the quarter in which the course is to be taken. 



218 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Dental Hygiene 

Faculty 

* Tanenbaum, Barbara, Department Head 

Coursey, Teresa 
Edenfield, Suzanne 
Mengle, Janice 

* Graduate Faculty 

The mission of the dental hygiene programs is to educate dental hygiene graduates 
who demonstrate competent clinical skills, effective communication skills, respect for the 
dental team, and professional and ethical standards in providing complete dental 
hygiene patient care. During the educational process, the program fosters the develop- 
ment of life long learning with faculty that are current in academic and clinical knowledge. 

Departmental Goals 

1. Graduate qualified dental hygienists who can demonstrate competent clinical skills. 

2. Develop dental hygienists with respect for the dental team who possess high ethical 
and professional standards. 

3. Provide students with faculty that have current skills and knowledge and who 
communicate that knowledge with appropriate instructional methodology. 

4. Integrate academic knowledge from general education, biomedical sciences, dental 
sciences, and dental hygiene sciences into practical application. 

5. Develop effective communication skills to disseminate preventive dental health 
education in the clinical setting and in the community. 

6. Strive to provide state of the art equipment and resources that reflect the newest 
technology. 

7. Provide a mechanism for ongoing evaluation of program goals and objectives. 

8. Recruit motivated students that will matriculate through the degree programs with 
sensitivity to diversity. 

9. Promote an interest in life long learning through development of critical thinking and 
research skills to become an effective change agent. 

The student must complete a curriculum of 120 quarter hours for the two-year 
program leading to the Associate in Science Degree in Dental Hygiene. Dental hygienists 
provide dental health services in private dental offices, civil service positions, industry, 
and in various public health fields. They practice under the supervision of a dentist and 
must pass a national and a regional or state board examination for licensure. The 
curriculum is fully approved by the Commission on Dental Accreditation of the Ameri- 
can Dental Association. 

Progression Requirements 

1 . The student must earn a "C " or better in each Dental Hygiene course before registering 
for subsequent dental hygiene courses; therefore, a grade of "C" or better in the 
previous course(s) is a prerequisite for each dental hygiene course for which the 
student registers after the first quarter of the first year. 

2. A passing grade in all related natural science courses is a prerequisite to the 200 level 
Dental hygiene courses; therefore, CHE 201, ZOO 208-209, and BIO 210 must be 
satisfactorily completed before the student will be admitted into second-year status in 
the Dental Hygiene Program. See "Limits on Admission to Health Professions 
Programs," in the "Admissions" section of this catalog for the policy regarding the 
repeat of science courses. 

3. Challenge examinations for specific dental hygiene subject areas are available in the 
department. Contact the Department for information. 



DENTAL HYGIENE 219 



i Audited and 01 repeated coursework may iituvt a suuimt 's .ii.uirmn pri^rrss m 
relation to the requirements foi finaru ial aid In addition, federal assistant e and \ \ 
educational benefits w ill not be paid foi audited and 01 repeated < oui 
\il students must submit a < omplete medic al report form, evidence of health ii 
ance andet idem e of liability (malpractice) insurance prior to participation in clinical 
experien< es 
6 Students must obtain c PR certification prioi to the first i linical experien< «• 

\n students must have pasaed tin- Regents' l xam before entering theii last quartet 
B \n overall GP \ ol 2 is required foi graduation 

I he Ba< heloi ot S< ien* e in l Cental \ i\ giene Edu< ation Program is designed for the post 
associate degree registered dental hygienist rhe goal ol tin- program is to provide 
additional education in preparation to assume ke) roles in educational and othei 
Bettings Students ma) choose to enter the program as a full or part-time student allowing 
tor flexibility ol class and work schedules rhe program is co mpri sed ol preparatory 
courses that will enable the student to be emplo) ed in areas such as dental h\ giene and 
dental assisting instruction, dental health education, and public health. I he student will 
w ork \\ ith the dental h\ giene faculty and participate in the student teaching practic urns 
in various associate degree classes, clinics, laboratories, and extra-mural fa< ilities. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF ASSOCIATE IN 
SCIENCE IN DENTAL HYGIENE 

Hours 

\ ( ieneral Requirements 

Area l 15 

1. ENG 101. 102; or 192 10 

2. DRS228 

Area II 

1. MAT 101 

Area ill 20 

1. PSY 101 5 

2. SOC201 5 

3. HIS 251 or 252 5 

4. POS 113 5 

Area IV 5 

1. CHE 201 

Area V 3 

1. PE 117 or 166 2 

2. One activity course 1 

B. Courses in the Major Field 57 

1. DH 111 , 112,113,118,120,122,123,125, 211, 212, 213, 214, 21b, 221. 

::: 223, 225, 228 57 

C. Courses in Related Fields 15 

1. BIO 210 5 

2. ZOO 208, 209 10 

D. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 120 
PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE IN DENTAL HYGIENE EDUCATION 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 101 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. PHI 201 5 



220 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Area II 20 

1. MAT 101, 220 10 

2. BIO 101, 102 10 

Area III 25 

1. SOC201 5 

2. HIS 251 or 252 and 114, 115 or 192 15 

3. POS113 5 

Area IV 30 

1. CHE 121, 122 10 

2. DRS228 5 

3. PSY101 5 

4. ZOO 208, 209 10 

AreaV 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 or 166 3 

2. Three activity courses 3 

B. Courses in the Major Field 77 

1. DH 111, 112, 113, 118, 120, 122, 123, 125, 211, 212, 213, 214, 216, 221, 

222, 223, 225, 228 57 

2 DH 401, 402, 403, 404 20 

C. Courses in Related Fields 25 

1. BIO 210 5 

2. PSY 201 or EDN 201, PSY 295 10 

3. EDN 200 5 

4. HE 301 or HS 485 5 

D. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 203 

Offerings 

DH 111 Clinical Dental Hygiene I (2-6-4) 

Fall. Prerequisite: Formal admission to the program. 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the dental hygiene profession. 
The subject matter includes fundamental knowledge of clinical procedures and 
techniques of removing deposits from the teeth. Clinical procedures are introduced 
on the manikins and the student is required to practice these techniques until 
proficiency is achieved. 

DH 112 Clinical Dental Hygiene II (2-6-4) 

Prerequisite: DH 111 and DH 122. 

The student further develops clinical skills by performing instrumentation proce- 
dures on classmates. Additionally, the student performs oral prophylactic techniques 
on patients in the clinic under supervision. The subject matter includes procedures 
which the hygienist will use in the performance of clinical duties. The student 
applies acquired knowledge in clinical situations. 

DH 113 Clinical Dental Hygiene III (1-9-4) 

Spring. Prerequisite: DH 112. 

Students continue with oral prophylactic techniques on patients in the clinic under 
supervision. The subject matter includes material which the student will integrate 
into the performance of clinical procedures. 

DH 118 Periodontics (2-0-2) 

Spring. Prerequisite: DH 112. 

The basic principles of periodontal health and disease in relation to the total health 

of the patient are presented in this course. Concepts of etiology and periodontal 

pathology are considered. Periodontal knowledge is applied in the clinical 

experience. 



DENTAL HYGIENE 221 



mi 120 Dental Roentgenology (2 

\\r quisite I Ml 1 1 1 ..mi I >l I 

I his v I'tllM' W ill liu hide 

rience In tin- fundamentals t »i dental radiology Intr.u-r 
techiriques for the Ukmg and processing taught ^ linicall 

lubeequenl quarters * ill afford the applu ation "t these prim iplea 

nil 122 Head md Neck taatomi (2-0-2) 

I .ill Prerequisite I ormal admission to the program 
Ihis course is designed to familiarize the dental hygiene student with 
anatomical relationships in tin- head and neck Special emphasia ia given t«> the 
anatom) ol tin- oral ^ a\ it\ and its clinical applu ation 

DH 123 Dental taatmnj and Oral Histoh>g\ I >-2-^> 
I all Prerequisite I ormal admission to the program 

1 his uuirsc is designed to familiarize the dental hygiene student with tin- nomen 
clature, morphology, eruption sequence i>t tin- primar) and lecondar) dentition 
and oral histolog) and embryolog) ol tin- oral cat it\ 

nil 125 General and Oral Pathology (2-o-2i 
Spring Prerequisite: DH 112. 

I his course is designed to familiarize dental hygiene students with the principles of 
genera] patholog) in relation to tin- common oral diseases. \ mphasis i^ pla 
clinical manifestations and the importanceoi early recognition of abnoi mal conditions 

DH 211/ 

212 213 Clinical Dental Hygiene IV, V, VI (2-12-6) (2-12-6) (1-15-6) 

Fall. Winter and Spring respectively. Prerequisites: DH 111. 112, L13; BIO 210. 
I hese courses are a continuation of the preceding clinical courses. Emphasis centers 
on the students' advancement ^nd improved proficiency in all areas of a working 
elinie. Students are supervised and evaluated on all clinical procedures using a 
sequenced level of difficulty to determine competency of clinical skills as well as 
assimilation of didactic knowledge into clinical arenas. Lecture time is de\ oted to 
pertinent material related to the dental hygiene profession and discussion of 
experiences encountered in clinical situations 

DH 214 Anesthesiology and Pharmacology (2-0-2) 

Winter. Prerequisite: DH 211. 

This course is designed to familiarize the student with drugs and anesthetics with 
particular emphasis on those used in dentistry. I he subject matter will include 
origin, physical and chemical properties, preparation, modes of administration, 
and effects upon the body systems. The fundamentals oi prescription writing will 
he introduced. 

DH 216 Dental Public Health (3-0-3) 

Winter. Prerequisite: DH 211. 

This course introduces the student to the various aspects of public health with 
reference to the dental needs of the community. The distribution of dental disease 
and current public health trends are considered. Epidemiology and interpretation 
of data related to community dental health programs are emphasi/ed. Directed 
field experience is included. 

DH 221 Scopes of Dental Hygiene Practice (1-0-1) 

Spring. Prerequisite: D\\ 212. 

This course is designed to acquaint students with various scopes of dental hygiene 
practice, the jurisprudence governing the practice oi dental hygiene, and the 
structure and function oi professional associations. 

DH 222 Dental Materials (2-3-3) 

Fall. Prerequisite: DH 113. 

This course is designed to provide the student with a basic knowledge of the 
chemical, physical, and mechanical properties of dental materials. The indications 
and limitations of materials are stressed as well as proper manipulation of those 
materials used by dental hygienists. The principles of dental materials utilization 
are presented and applied during the clinical experience. 



222 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



DH 223 Applied Nutrition (2-0-2) 

Fall. Prerequisite: DH 113. 

This course presents the aspects of nutrition as applied to the practice of dentistry. 
The course acquaints the student with nutrition education as an integral component 
of the duties and functions of a dental hygienist. 

DH 225 Preventive Periodontics (2-0-2) 

Fall. Prerequisite: DH 113. 

The emphasis of this course is the prevention of periodontal diseases. Many facets 
of preventive periodontics are included with emphasis on mechanical and chemical 
plaque control measures and patient motivation. Various aspects of periodontal 
diseases are presented. Treatment planning and case presentations allow the 
synthesis of knowledge which is applied in the clinical experience. 

DH 228 Dental Health Education (1-3-2) 

Winter. Prerequisite: DH 211. 

The student is familiarized with the practical application of modern methods of 
dental health education. Course content includes development of teaching materi- 
als for dental health education demonstrations, presentation of materials, and field 
experiences. 

DH 401 Practicum In Dental Hygiene Education I (3-6-5) 

Fall. Prerequisite: Admission into the Dental Hygiene Education Program. 
This course is an introductory field experience in the college dental hygiene clinic, 
community agencies, and patient care facilities with emphasis on observation, 
individual and small group teaching, and teacher aide work. The first professional 
course for majors in Dental Hygiene Education. 

DH 402 Practicum In Dental Hygiene Education II (3-6-5) 

Winter. Prerequisite: DH 401. 

This course is a continuation of Dental Hygiene 401. Problems common to begin- 
ning dental hygiene teachers, practices and procedures designed to accomplish 
program objectives, establishment and organization of content, methods of evalu- 
ation and supervision in the dental hygiene clinic are included. 

DH 403 Practicum In Dental Hygiene Education III (3-6-5) 

Spring. Prerequisite: DH 402. 

This course is an advanced field experience designed to assist the student in the 
development of learning activities, teaching procedures, and the presentation of 
materials pertinent to dental hygiene education. The student will develop and teach 
selected units in the basic dental hygiene sequence at community agencies, and 
patient care facilities. 

DH 404 Directed and Individual Study (3-6-5) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

This course is a directed individual study in an area of major interest with emphasis 
relevant to dental hygiene and future career objectives. Scientific research and 
evaluation methods will be reviewed and used in the student's individual project. 



HEALTH SCIENCE 223 



Health Science 

I .nult\ 

•Streatei fames Acting Department Head 
1 Simon, l mma I 
* », iraduate I a< ult) 

1 heo\ erall mission ol me Ba< helorol l lealth S< ien< e program is to make a \ ailable an 
edu< ationaJ opportunit) for persons interested in entering a health field and an a< ademk 

.:,ini for experienced health professionals who w ish to further tlu-ir career opportu- 
nities. More spe< ifically, the objecth es ol the program are: 

l. I o prepare students with tlu* knowledge thai beha\ ioraJ c hange< an o< i ur through 
education; 

2 [*o prepare students to foster health, health promotion, and disease prevention; 

I o pirn ide the opportunit) for students to gain expertise in the health related areas 
of health promotion education, administration, nursing ^nd allied health profes- 
sions 01 health mu\ fitness management. 
1 he emphasis of the curriculum is to view "health" as different from "illness" and to 
teach new students and practicing health professionals of this difference. I he curriculum 
Will permit the student to earn a baccalaureate degree that reflects expertise in health 
Science while focusing on ^\n applied health related area. Upon graduation, these health 
professionals will implement the concepts they have learned and direct the efforts of the 
public in the promotion, enhancement, and maintenance of health and in the prevention 
of health problems. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 
HEALTH SCIENCE 

General Requirements (96 hours) 

Area 1 20 

1. ENG 101, 102 or 192, 201 or 292 15 

2. One course selected from ART 200, 271, 272, 273; MUS 200; DRS 201; 
PHI 201 5 

Area II 20 

1. One of the following laboratory science sequences: 10 

BIO 101, 102 or 111, 112 

CHE 121, 122 
CHE 128, 129 
PHY 211, 212 

2. MAT 101 and 220 10 

Area III 20 

1. HIS 114, 115 or 192 10 

2. POS113 5 

3. One course selected from: ANT 201, ECO 201, SOC 201 5 

Area IV 30 

1. HS 100 5 

2. HIS 251 or 252 5 

3. PSY101 5 

4. PEM252 5 

5. CS115 5 

6. DRS 228 5 

AreaV 6 

1. PE166 2 

2. PE101 1 



224 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



3. PE 103 or 108 1 

4. Two activity courses 2 

Health Science Core (45 hours) 

HS 350 Health in the Community 5 

HS 440 Health Planning and Evaluation 5 

HS445 Seminar in Health Science 5 

HS450 Health Science Practicum 5 

HS480 Epidemiology 5 

HE 301 Marketing Health 5 

ENG 372 Technical and Business Comm 5 

PSY 220 Intro to Psychological Research 5 

PSY 295 Developmental Psychology 5 

Specialty Tracks (55 hours) (Student will choose one specialty track) 

Track I - Health Promotion/Education (55 hours) 

HS 300 Health Problems in a Changing Society 5 

HS420 Nutrition 5 

HS 485 Survey of Gerontology 5 

HS 432 Health Law and Ethics 5 

HE 361 Health and Human Sexuality Education 5 

HE 370 Health Promotion 5 



HE 420 Health Education in Rehabilitation 5 

PSY 315 Psychology of Conflict and Stress 5 

PSY 406 Behavior Modification 5 

(2)Electives 10 

Track II - Health Administration (55 hours) 

ACC 211 Principles of Accounting I 5 

n HE 370 Health Promotion 5 

H HS 430 Health Care Economics 5 

3 HS 431 Health Finance 5 

HS432 Health Law and Ethics 5 

HS433 Health Administration 5 

PSY 320 Industrial /Organizational Psychology 5 

PSY 321 Psychology of Work Behavior 5 

PSY 322 Psychology of Organizational Development 5 

Electives 10 

Track III - Health and Fitness Management (55 hours) 

ACC 211 Principles of Accounting I 5 

HS 431 Health Finance 5 

HS 432 Health Law and Ethics 5 

HS 434 Wellness Management 5 

HS 452 Health/Fitness Practicum 5 

HE 420 Health Education in Rehabilitation 5 

PSY 321 Psychology of Work Behavior 5 

PSY 322 Psy of Organizational Development 5 

PSY 406 Behavior Modification 5 

Electives 10 

Track IV- Nursing, Allied Health and Athletic Training (55 hours) 

Forty-five (45) quarter hours from nursing, allied health or athletic training major 
course work and ten (10) hours of electives may be utilized. The fifty-five (55) hours 
utilized will be determined by the Health Science Department Head. 
Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL HOURS FOR THE BACHELOR OF HEALTH SCIENCE 196 

1SIOTF- All RHS QtnHpnk mnst hp rnrrpnrlv CPR rprh'fiprl at rhp timp of graduation. 



HEALTH SCIENCE 225 



Minor Concentration: 

["heminoi in Health Science requires 20 quartei hours with grades ol ( 01 bettei I h<- 
trudenl m ill complete the follow Ing 

1 v. OUI BeS ft OCT 

ill K)1 Marketing Health 

l II in» I pidemioloj 

I IS ! 10 I lealth in tin' c ommunit) 

l is \\o I lealth Planning and l valuation 

HS 145 Seminar in I lealth s <. ience 

rOl \l HOI RSFOR INI BA( HELOROl MI \ I nisi n v i MINOR 



Health Science Gerontology Certificate Program 

Goal: ro provide students with a multi-disciplinar) ba< kground in aging and present 
mem me opportunity to explore aspects oi aging and relevant to interests and career 
goals. 

Securing Admission to the Certificate Program: As soon as a student determines mat 
he or slu % w ould like to complete the *> lerontolog) C ertifk ate Program! me student must 
complete me application for admission and return it to the I lealth & ieru e I department. 
I pon receipt ol me application, the student will be invited to meet with an assigned 
faculty member to discuss the proposed program ol Stud) . A minimum grade oi "< or 
better must he earned in each course for the certificate to he awarded on the undergradu- 
ate level. A minimum o\ erall grade point average of "B" or better must he earned for the 
Certificate to be awarded on the graduate lex el 

Curriculum Requirements: The Gerontology Certificate Program consists of six 
Courses | 50 qtr. hours). I he courses are as follow s: 

1. HS 485 -Survey of ( lerontology 5 

2. PS^i 475- 1 he Psychology of Aging 5 

3. PE 400 - Physical Activity and the Older Adult 5 

4. I IS 420 - Nutrition 5 

5. Elective - (from approved list) 

6 I I s 42^ - Gerontological Practicum 5 

(fterequisite/Corequisites: HS 485, HS 420, PSY 475, PE 400, ,md elective.) 

Health Science Offerings 

HS 100 Introduction to Health Science (5-0-5) 

Exploration of the science of health. Based on the health (versus illness) model, this 
course will emphasize the enhancement of health as part oi natural human de\ el- 
opment. The multifaceted health care delivery system will be introduced, and some 
ethical, philosophical, and socio-cultural issues of health care will he discussed. 

HS 200 Health and Human Development I (5-0-5) 

A presentation of human growth and development theory. Emphasis will he placed 

on the physical, cognitive and psychosocial development of man from pre-natal 
development to the adolescent stage of the human lifespan. This will he examined 
from the perspective of enhancing health and concomitantly avoiding illness. 

HS 201 Health and Human Development II (5-05) 

The continuation of the study of human development from voung adulthood to the 
completion of the life cycle. Special emphasis is placed on health concerns and 
lifestyle consequences of the adult \ ears o\ the life span. 

HS 300 Health Problems In A Changing Society (5-0-5) 

A review of health as a function of changing societal health status indicators. Topics 
may include, but are not limited to, substance abuse, violence, environmental 
issues, and technology. 



226 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

HS 350 Health In the Community (5-0-5) 

Analysis of major community health problems, their causes, the role of individuals, 
community institutions, and government. 

HS 420 Nutrition (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: Area II Lab Science sequence. 

Nutrition, as a major component of lifestyle, is related to enhancement of health and 

contribution to illness. Basic concepts of nutrition and various "diets" are studied. 

HS 425 Gerontological Practicum (1-8-5) 

Prerequisite/co-requisites: HS 485, PSY 475, PE 400, HS 420, and gerontology 

elective. 

This course is designed to assist the student in applying the knowledge obtained 

from previous courses in order to implement a chosen role in gerontology. Each 

sponsoring organization will provide a qualified supervisor. A member of the ASC 

Faculty will be assigned to the practicum; he/she will establish performance 

criteria and evaluate accordingly. 

HS 430 Health Care Economics (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ECO 201. 

Economics of the health care sector. An economic analysis of public policy alterna- 
tives in the health care industry. Roles of the physician, hospital, insurance 
companies, government and other forces that influence health care economics are 
examined. 

HS 431 Health Finance (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: ACC 211. 

Introductory survey of theoretical and practical approaches to the financial man- 
agement of health care institutions. Financing issues specific to the health care 
industry will be discussed. 

HS 432 Health Law and Ethics (5-0-5) 

Introduction of the legal bases and ethical dimensions of healthcare decision 
making. Designed to give the student a philosophical foundation in the discussion 
of specific legal and ethical topics in health care. 

HS 433 Health Administration (5-0-5) 

Application of theory and concepts of administration in health services systems and 
organizations. Course covers the broad spectrum of health policy, planning, and 
management of the health services system. 

HS 434 Wellness Management (5-0-5) 

This course is designed to provide students with the skills necessary to design, 
implement, manage and evaluate profit-oriented health promotion and fitness 
programs in various settings. Emphasis will be on financing/budgeting, human 
resources, marketing, program effectiveness, solvency and legal issues specific to 
wellness centers. 

HS 440 Health Planning and Evaluation (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: HS 100. 

Planning and evaluation of health programs in a variety of settings. 

HS 445 Seminar In Health Science (5-0-5) 

Corequisite/ Prerequisite: HS 440. 

Health Science concepts are analyzed and synthesized. Emerging and emergent 

issues and trends are investigated. 

HS 450 Health Science Practicum (1-8-5) 

Corequisite/ Prerequisite: PSY 220, HS 445, 440. 

This course provides the health science student the opportunity to be an active 

participant in an area of the health care industry. 

HE 452 Health/Fitness Practicum (1-8-5) 

Practicum in health and fitness management. 



HEALTH SCIENCE 227 



us ist) i pidemlologj (5-€ I) 

Prerequisite I I s 100 

rhe application ol ecolog) to health and illness \n investigation mti> the various 
t.u tv>ts md conditions thai determine tin- occurrence and distribution "t health. 

disease and death among groups ol indh iduala 

us \&s Survej of Gerontolog) (5-0-5) 

I Ins i ourse is designed to introduce students to the element foi under* 

standing the sging situation I mphasis v-s.il! be placed on the physiological and 
functional changes associated with the aging process chroni 
morbidity death and d) ing, and <-Hi-v ts t >t aging on health, attitudes, and activities 
Resean h methods in gerontolog) . major publu polu y issues, and fm.nu ial issues 
w ill be uu luded 

Health Education Offerings 

hi 260 Contemporary Health Issues (5-0-5) 

Study ol major health topics along with their effe< ts on modem so< ietj s iu h topic 5 
as em ironmental pollution, medical ethi< s, health care 1 osts, personal health, and 
health consumerism will be investigated. 

HE 262 Health and Drug Education (2-0-2) 

\ study ol the effects of tobacco, alcohol, and drug use and abuse on health. It 
includes an analysis oi the classification ol drugs, the effects oi drug usage, the 

legality oi drug usage, and drug dependency. Emphasis is on intentions .md 
curriculum nuitcri.il available tor teachers and health educators. 

HE 301 Marketing Health (5-0-5) 

A Burvey ol marketing strategies utilized in health settings. Basic principles of 
COmmunk ation integrated with various media modalities are explored. The meth- 
ods and media will be designed tor the biopsvehosocial requirements of the client. 

HE 360 School Health Education (3-0-3) 

An investigation of the total school health environment and health instruction. 

HE 361 Health and Human Sexuality Education (5-0-5) 

A study of the relationship between health and sexuality education. Health promo- 
tion strategies dealing with sexual behavior, sexually transmitted diseases, 
pregnancy, pregnancy prevention, and parenthood are involved. Emphasis is or 

interventions and curriculum material available for teachers and health educators. 

HE 370 Health Promotion (5-0-5) 

Students will learn the multiple skills needed to design, implement and evaluate 
health promotion and wellness programs in various settings, such as hospitals, 
corporations, and school systems. All aspects of program administration and 
evaluation will be discussed from program justification to participant motivation. 
In addition, specific modalities of health promotion at the worksite will be 
addressed. 

HE 420 Health Education In Rehabilitation (5-0-5) 

The role of health promotion/education in the rehabilitative process will be 
discussed and evaluated. Various strategies and their effectiveness will help 
students identify the best methods for ensuring compliance and improved health 
status of clients. The specific needs ol various populations will also be discussed. 

HE 460 Health In the Curriculum (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: HE 260, 261, 262, 360, HS 420 and admission to Teacher Education. 
The study of health education curriculum with emphasis upon materials and 
methods of teaching health education K-12. This course places special focus on the 
development of health education curriculum, instructional units, writing objec- 
tives, lesson and unit planning, and the relationship of health education to the total 
education program. 



228 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Medical Technology 

Faculty 

Hardegree, Lester Jr., Program Director 
Edgar, John Ralph, Medical Director 
Rodgers, Anne 

Medical technology is a career in clinical laboratory science. Medical technologists 
perform and /or supervise the testing of blood, urine, spinal fluid and other body 
specimens. Applying the knowledge of chemistry, mathematics and biology, the medical 
technologist uses both manual and automated techniques to provide diagnostic data to 
physicians. 

The Medical Technology Program offers the Bachelor of Science degree in Medical 
Technology and a Certificate of Completion of the Medical Technology Program. The B.S. 
in Medical Technology is awarded to students who complete all degree requirements for 
Armstrong State College. Entering Freshman, transfer students, and associate degree 
medical laboratory technicians are eligible for the degree. The Certificate of Completion 
is awarded to those who have completed a degree in biology, chemistry, microbiology or 
related science fields and to transient students from other institutions affiliated with the 
program which award the Bachelor of Science degree (Georgia College, Georgia South- 
ern University and Savannah State College). 

The B.S. in Medical Technology curriculum is a 4 year program. During the first two 
or three years students complete core curriculum courses in chemistry, biology, math- 
ematics, humanities and social science. The five quarter professional phase starts each fall 
quarter. Courses cover the major laboratory areas (urinalysis, hematology, clinical 
chemistrv, blood banking, microbiology, serology), and are taught on campus. The 
clinical practicum is provided in the clinical laboratories of Candler General Hospital, the 
South Atlantic Red Cross Blood Center, Memorial Medical Center and St. Joseph's 
Hospital, all located in Savannah. Upon completion of the program, graduates are 
eligible to take the certification examination of the Board of Registry for Medical 
Technologists of the American Societv of Clinical Pathologists and the Clinical Labora- 
torv Scientist examination of the National Certification Agency for Medical Laboratory 
Personnel. 

Post Acceptance Requirements 

Students accepted into the program will be required to submit a complete Armstrong 
State College Health Professions Student Health Appraisal form. Prior to enrollment in 
the clinical practicum the student will be required to provide evidence of liability 
insurance and medical coverage. Students are responsible for their own transportation to 
and from the clinical sites and are required to adhere to arranged hospital time schedule. 

Progression Requirements 

1 . The student must earn a "C" or better in each Medical Technology course. 

2. A student may repeat a single MT course only one time and at the next offering 
provided space is available. 

3. A student who must repeat a single MT course more than once or more than one MT 
course will be dismissed from the program with no option for readmission. 

4. The student must maintain an overall adjusted Grade Point Average of 2.0 or better. 
A student who falls below the 2.0 GPA will be placed on "Suspension" for one quarter. 
If the student's GPA is not raised by the end of the next quarter, then the student will 
be dismissed from the program. 

5. The student must complete the Professional coursework within three (3) consecutive 
vears from the date of their initial admission to the Medical Technology Program. 



MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 229 



PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Hours 

\ c General Requirements 

\UM l 

1. I V. in 1 102 or 192, 201 01 292 

One course selected from ami 200,271,2 

\UM II 

1. c HI 128 129 in 

: \1 \1 101,220 lo 

At CM 111 

1. HIS 114, H5or L92 K) 

:. POS 113 

) One course selected from: ANT 201, ECO 201, PS\ 101,SO( 201.. 

a IV 30 

1 BIO 101 

: ZOO 208 5 

1 1 lectives in BIO, CHE and/or CS 20 

(Must contain at least l Biology or Zoology course which completes 

a 10 hour sequence, and 1 Chemistry coursi 
\rea V 6 

1. PE 103 or 108 and 117 or 166 3 

2. I hree activity courses 3 

State Requirement 

HIS 251 or 252 

B. Courses in the Major Field ^7 

1. Upper Division Sequences 20 

BIO 351, 353 10 

CHE 341, 342, 10 

2. Professional Courses 77 

M r 200, 310, 320, 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, 390, 420, 430, 440, 450, 

411, 421, 431,441,451,461,490 77 

C. Regents' and Exit Examinations 

TOTAL 198 

Offerings 

MT 200 Introduction to Medical Laboratory Science (2-2-3) 

An introductory course to acquaint the student with the role of the Medical 
Technologist as a member of the health care team and basic skills needed for the 
practice of clinical laboratory science. Topics will include content common to 
several discipline areas and basic laboratory mathematics. The laboratory will 
emphasize basic skills common to many diagnostic procedures, b 

MT 310 Urinalysis and Body Fluids (3-4-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program or permission of program director. 
A qualitative and quantitative study of the chemical and microscopic constituents 
of urine and other body fluids and the clinical significance of the test results. 

MT 320 Clinical Microbiology I (4-6-7) 

Prerequisite: BIO 351 or permission of program director. 

A study of the relationship of bacteria to disease. Major emphasis is placed on the 
isolation and identification of bacteria responsible for human diseases. Also in- 
cluded is sensitivity testing and mycobacteriologv. 



230 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

MT 330 Clinical Hematology I (4-6-7) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program or permission of program director. 
A qualitative and quantitative study of the formed elements of the blood. To include 
the complete blood count and specialized test procedures. This course will also 
include the basic principles of hemostasis and blood coagulation. 

MT 340 Clinical Immunohematology I (3-6-6) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program or permission of program director. 
A study of basic immunohematologic principles and their application to the 
preparation and administration of whole blood and blood components. To include 
the selection and processing of donors, cross matching procedures, and antibody 
identification. 

MT 350 Clinical Chemistry I (4-6-7) 

Prerequisite: CHE 342, and MT 360 or permission of program director. 

A comprehensive study of the physiological principles, methodology and clinical 

significance of the biochemicals and elements found in the body fluids. 

MT 360 Clinical Instrumentation (3-4-5) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program or permission of program director. 
A basic study of the principles and operation of laboratory instrumentation. 
Emphasis will be placed on the individual components and the inter-relationship 
of the components. Electronics will be included. 

MT 370 Clinical Serology (2-2-3) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program or permission of program director. 
A study of the principles and procedures used in the isolation, identification and 
quantitation of diagnostically significant antigens and antibodies. 

MT 380 Clinical Parasitology (2-2-3) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program or permission of program director. 
A study of the pathogenesis, life cycle, and laboratory identification of human 
parasites. 

MT 390 Clinical Mycology (2-2-3) 

Prerequisite: Admission to the MT program or permission of program director. 
A study of the pathogenesis and laboratory isolation and identification of fungi that 
can invade humans. 

MT 400 Directed Study (l-5)-0-(l-5) 

Offered on demand with approval of program director. 

A study of selected Medical Technology topics designed to meet the needs of the 
student. Credit will depend upon the work to be done. May be repeated up to 10 
quarter hours. 

MT 420 Clinical Microbiology II (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in clinical practicum and completion of 

MT 320. 

Advanced level lecture presentations of special topics in microbiology. 

MT 430 Clinical Hematology II (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in clinical practicum and completion of 

MT 330. 

Advanced level lecture presentations of special topics in hematology. 

MT 440 Clinical Immunohematology II (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in clinical practicum and completion of 

MT 340. 

Advanced level lecture presentations of special topics in immunohematology. 

MT 450 Clinical Chemistry II (2-0-2) 

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in clinical practicum and completion of 

MT 350. 

Advanced level lecture presentations of special topics in clinical chemistry. 



RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGIES 231 



\n 111 Phlebotont) Practicum MM I) 

\i i 1:1 Clinical Microbiology Practicum (0-16-4) 

\i i 131 c linical Hematolog) Practicum (0-16 I) 

\i i in t linical Inununohematolog} P ra ctic u m (0 s I) 

\i i im c linical ( hemiatr) Practicum (0-20-5) 

\i l 161 c linical I rinalytis Practicum (0-fl 

rotal (0-72-18) 

Prerequisites c ompletion o( respe< tive didactive Ml « >>m 
\ struc tin I'd clinical laboratory experience where the students mt< 
application under supen ision in the identified content .irv.i I his * ill prw idc time 
and fa< ilitu-s to allot* the students to de\ elop speed, i onfideiv »• and organization 
and to anal) re and aoh e te< hni< al problems. 

\n 190 Management and Education (2-0-2) 

Basi< concepts of laboratory management, leadership and education 



Radiologic Technologies 



l acuity 

Gibson, Sharyn, Department Head 

* hlson. Ehvin, Clinical Coordinator 

McRae, I aurie, Program Director, Radiation rherapy 

* Graduate Faculty 

Radiologic rechnolog) is a comprehensive term that is applied to the science of 

administering ionizing radiation, radionuclides, and other forms oi energy to prcn ide 
technical information ,md assistance to the physician in the diagnosis and treatment of 
diseases and injuries. 1 his field otters tour specific career specialities; radiography, 
nuclear medicine technology, radiation therapy technology and diagnostic medical 
sonography. At present, the Radiologic rechnologies Program otters an Associate 
1 tegree in the specialty area of radiography and a post certificate program in Radiation 
I he rap v. 

Radiography Program Goals 

The specific goals of the Program are as follows: 

1. To educate superlative clinicians. In addition to mastering basic skills necessary to 

perform routine radiographic examinations, the Program's graduate will pos 

skills necessary to perform non-routine and special radiographic procedures 
2 I o expose the student to an in-depth analysis of the art and science of radiography. 

The student will receive not only an indepth education to radiography but also in 

related natural and social sciences. 
3. To give the students a well rounded liberal arts education. In addition to the 

professional component of the curriculum, the student receives a well rounded 

liberal arts education so that the student will be able to effectively integrate into 

society. 

Professional Insurance, Transportation 

Local hospitals are affiliated with the college for the Clinical Education con- 
Students are responsible for pro\ iding their own transportation to the hospitals. 

Prior to matriculation through Clinical Education Courses, students are required to 
submit eyidence of professional liability insurance, health insurance CPR certification, 
and a physical examination. Specific information regarding these requirements will be 
distributed to students admitted to the Program. 



232 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Radiography Progression Requirements 

For progression through the Radiography Program, the following is required: 

1. Science courses (ZOO 208, 209, CHE 201, CS 115) 

a. A passing grade in each course. 

b. A "C" or better in at least three of these courses. 

c. No more than two (2) science courses may be repeated, and that no one 
course may be repeated more than once. 

2. Radiography courses 

a. A "C" or better in each radiography course. 

b. A student who fails any radiography course or earns a grade less than "C" in 
RAD 115 will be suspended from the Program. 

c. If a student earns a grade of "D" in one radiography course, the student will 
be placed on probation and must repeat the course. If a grade of "D" is 
earned in a second radiography course, the student will be suspended from 
the Program. 

d. In the event a student makes less than a grade of "C" in any prerequisites for 
a Radiography course, the student may not be allowed to progress in the 
curriculum sequence. 

3. Students must have a 2.0 GPA to graduate from the Program. 

Attendance and Advanced Standing 

A student must matriculate each quarter, including Summer Quarter, to remain in the 
Radiography Program. If, because of illness or other extenuating circumstances, a 
student must be away from school for a quarter or more, the student must seek formal 
approval from the Department Head for such an absence. If such approval is not sought 
and granted, the student will be dropped from active status and must reapply for 
admission before continuing in the Program. Readmission is based on the readmission 
criteria and space availability, and are competitive in nature. 

The Radiologic Technologies Program is committed to a philosophy of educational 
flexibility to meet the needs of the profession. Individuals who are graduates of Certifi- 
cate (hospital) Programs and working in the profession who are certified by the American 
Registry of Radiologic Technologists may receive advanced standing by a process of 
exemption examinations and CLEP examinations. These individuals may be awarded 
Credit-By-Examination up to 45 quarter hours for previous professional education. 
Please contact the Department Head for details. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE 
IN RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGIES 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 33 

Area 1 10 

ENG 101, 102 or 192 10 

Area II 5 

MAT 101 5 

Area III 10 

HIS 251 or 252 5 

POS113 5 

Area IV 5 

CHE 201 5 

AreaV 3 

Any three physical education credits 3 



RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGIES 233 



B ( ourees in the Majoi I ield 

R \i> 1(M 110 1 15 116 II ' 118 121 122 123 

RAD 201 I 

c ( ourses in Related l ields 

CS 1 1 5 

AH' III 

I > Regents and I \it l xaminations 

rOTAI III 

Radiologic Technologies Offerings 

R \d idi introduction to Radiologic rechnology (2-0-2) 

I he role of the Radiologic Fechnologisi is presented in the historical conti 
medicine and radiology within the health caredelh rr\ sj stem I he organizational 
structure of the Radiolog) I >epartment, spec ialties w ithin the profession, ; 
sional organization, accreditation, certification, licensure, and professional 
development are discussed. Elemental") radiation protection and elementary 
image control are emphasized. 

RAD 1 04 Principles of Radiographic Exposure (4-3-5) 
Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Program. 

I >u tors influencing radiographic quality and conditions influencing exposures are 
presented. Attenuating de\ ices, beam restricting de\ ices, and accessory equipment 

are demonstrated. I echnic (.harts and formation are \ ehi< les tor the application of 
the radiographic process. 

RAD 110 Patient Care and Interaction (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: Formal admission to the Program. 

Concepts of patient care including physical and psychological needs of the family 

and patient will be addressed. Principles ot body mechanics and patient transfer 
techniques, interaction with the terminally ill. obtaining vital signs, administration 
of injections, |.\' maintenance, urinarv catheri/ation, and dealing with eme rg e n cy 
medical situations will be studied. Infectious disease processes and universal 

precautions will be included. 

RAD 115 Radiographic Procedures I (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the program. 

Ihe theory and principles of radiographic examinations of the chest and abdomen 
are studied. Emphasis is placed on radiographic examination of the visceral organs 

requiring the use of contrast media, spatial relationships, patient positioning, 
equipment manipulation, and quality evaluation of the study. Basic medical 
terminology will be included. 

RAD 116 Radiographic Procedures II (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the program and a C or better in RAD 1 15. 
The basic theory and principles of radiographic procedures of the extremities and 
shoulder girdle are studied. Emphasis is placed on OSteo anatomy, spatial relation- 
ships, patient positioning, equipment manipulation, and quality evaluation of the 
radiographic examinations. Basic medical terminology will be included. 

RAD 117 Radiographic Procedures III (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the program and RAD 1 lb. 
The theory and principles of radiographic examinations of the spines, bony thorax, 
and pelvic girdle are studied. Emphasis is placed on the osteo anatomy, spatial 
relationships, patient positioning, equipment manipulation, and quality evalua- 
tion of the radiographic examinations. 

RAD 118 Radiographic Procedures IV (3.5-1.5-4) 

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the program and RAD 117. 
The theory and principles oi facial bones, cranium, heart, breast, reproduction 
organs, and additional non-routine examinations are studied. Emphasis is placed 
on the osteo and soft-tissue anatomy, spatial relationships, patient positioning, 

equipment manipulation, and aualitv evaluation of the radiographic examinations. 



234 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



RAD 121 Clinical Education I (0-8-1) 

Prerequisites: Formal admission to the Program, permission of the instructor, and 
CPR certified. RAD 104, RAD 110, and RAD 115 must be taken as corequisite or 
prerequisite. 

Orientation to patient care, introduction to areas involving the field of radiology, 
and orientation to the clinical setting are presented. This is a supervised clinical 
practice in performing radiographic procedures, radiation protection, patient care, 
equipment orientation, radiographic technique, darkroom procedures, and film 
quality evaluation, observing and participating in routine radiographic examina- 
tions is included. 

RAD 122 Clinical Education II (0-16-2) 

Prerequisites: RAD 104 and RAD 121 and permission of the instructor. RAD 116 
must be taken as corequisite or prerequisite. 

This is a supervised clinical practice in performing radiographic procedures with 
an emphasis on the competency evaluation of routine radiographic examinations. 

RAD 123 Clinical Education III (0-16-2) 

Prerequisites: RAD 122 and permission of the instructor. RAD 117 must be taken as 
a corequisite or prerequisite. 

This course is a supervised clinical practice in performing radiographic procedures 
with an emphasis on the competency evaluation of routine radiographic examina- 
tions. 

RAD 201/202 Radiation Science I & II (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: MAT 101 or Permission of the instructor. 

This course deals with the application of radiation physics as it relates to the 
production, propagation and detection of electromagnetic and particulate radia- 
tion. Emphasis will be given to mechanisms describing the interaction of X- rays 
with matter, photographic and electronic image detection, electronic circuitry, and 
the physical function of associated radiographic equipment. 

RAD 203 Radiobiology (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: RAD 202 and ZOO 209 or permission of instructor. 
This course is designed to give the radiography student an understanding of the 
effects of radiation exposure, dose limits, and structural protection requirements. 
Topics included will be somatic and genetic effects of radiation exposure, measure- 
ment and protection methods, plus NCRP and BRH standards. 

RAD 205 Quality Assurance (2-2-3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

This course is a study of equipment testing and instrumentation, record keeping 

systems, and statistical analysis of equipment and supply usage. Emphasis will be 

given to testing procedures, QA program implementation, and federal government 

guidelines. 

RAD 221 Clinical Education IV (0-24-3) 

Prerequisites: RAD 123 and permission of the instructor. 

This course is a supervised clinical practice in performing radiographic procedures 

with an emphasis on the competency evaluation of radiographic examinations. 

RAD 222 Clinical Education V (0-24-3) 

Prerequisites: RAD 221 and permission of instructor. 

This course is a supervised clinical practice in performing radiographic procedures 

with an emphasis on the competency evaluation of radiographic examinations. 

RAD 223 Clinical Education VI (0-24-3) 

Prerequisites: RAD 222 and permission of the instructor. 

This course is a supervised clinical practice in performing radiographic procedures 

with an emphasis on the competency evaluation of radiographic examinations. 

RAD 224 Clinical Education VII (0-24-4) 

Prerequisites: RAD 223, successful completion of Regents' Examination, and per- 
mission of instructor. 

This course is a supervised clinical practice in performing radiographic procedures 
with an emphasis on the competency evaluation of radiographic examinations. The 



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RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGIES 235 



RAD 290 Selected fopiciln Advanced Medical Imaging (4 I I) 

Prerequisites Permission ol instructoi 

Ihis it an elective course that is offered upon demand [upichautha 
system examinations, central nervous system examinatii 
»-r.il \ iscuiar studies heart studies, computei 
maiv *• Imaging ma) be ln< luded 

Radiation Therapy Technology Certificate Program 

Radiation I herap) ia the use of ionizing radiation to treat riift*?ff* (primarily i an 
and is .in important modalit) in cancer treatment 

Program Goals 

1 rhe student will be enculturated into the art and science of Radiation rherap) as 
es idenced b\ graduates who exhibit accurate, responsible, and compassionate beha> 
iorsas members ol the healthcare team responsible for pro\ iding radiation treatments 

2 ro graduate students w hoconsistentl) score _v •• higher than the national mean on the 
certifying examination for Radiation rherapy rechnoli 

) I o meet the needs of the community by supplying Radiation I herapists to Savannah 

mk\ the Surrounding communities. 
4 ro promote professional awareness among the students and the radiation therapy 

community. 

Admission 

\ R.R.I, registered or registrv eligible radiographers may apply to this 12 month 
certificate program. The program begins in the Fall of each year, thus students are 
admitted only once per \ ear. I he program makes the determination ot admission based 
on scholastic historx and personal references. See the Radiologic Technologies Depart- 
ment tor further information and a program application. 

Program for the Certificate in Radiation Therapy Technology 
R \P 501, 302, 303, 304, 310, 313, 311, 314, 312, 318, 320, 321, 322, 323. 

Total 59 hours 

Radiation Therapy Course Offerings 

RAD 301 Principles of Radiation Therapy (5-0-5) 

Pre-requisite: Formal admission to the program. 

An introduction to radiation therapy including terminology, as well as clinical and 

technical criteria utilized in the treatment of cancer patients 

RAD 302 Methods of Patient Care (5-0-5) 

Pre-requisite or co-requisite: RAD 301. 

Insight into the physical and emotional care of the cancer patient. Emphasis will be 
placed on radiation side effects as well as special care required by individuals 
receiving Radiation Therapv 

RAD 303 Radiation Protection/Radiobiology in Radiation Therapy (5-0-5) 

Pre-requisite or co-requisite: RAD 301. 

The measurement and reduction of radiation exposure to the patient, healthcare 
worker, and general public will be studies. The principles o\ cellular response to 
low and high dose radiation will be thoroughlv explored. 

RAD 304 Oncologic Pathology (4-0-4) 

Pre-requisite: RAD 301, RAD 303 and permission of the instructor. 
The underlying pathologic mechanisms of tumor development and the theories 
describing causation of cellular changes will be explored. Tumor classification will 
also be introduced. 



236 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



RAD 310 Radiation Oncology I (5-0-5) 

Pre-requisite or co-requisite: RAD 304 and permission of the instructor. 
Aspects of cancer as a disease including tumor classification, staging, and the 
rationale of treatment choice will be discussed. 

RAD 311 Radiation Oncology II (5-0-5) 

Pre-requisite: RAD 310. 

A study of malignant neoplasms with an emphasis on etiology, epidemiology, 
treatment methods, and prognosis for cancers affecting each major system of the 
body. 
RAD 312 Radiation Oncology III (5-0-5) 
Pre-requisite: RAD 311. 

Special topics in cancer treatment will be explored including the latest innovations 
in the modalities of surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and immuno- 
therapy. 

RAD 313 Radiation Therapy Physics (5-0-5) 

Pre-requisite: RAD 303. 

This course will cover basic and applied concepts of physics as related to Radiation 
Therapy- Emphasis will be placed on production of radiation, operating principles 
of therapeutic equipment, dosimetric principles and the use of radioactive sources 
in cancer treatment. 

RAD 318 Quality Assurance in Radiation Therapy (3-0-3) 

Pre-requisite: RAD 313 and permission of the instructor. 

Facets of quality assurance in a radiation oncology department including principles 
of record-keeping as well as methods of baseline testing and periodic calibration of 
commonly used equipment. 

RAD 314 Treatment Planning (5-0-5) 

Co-requisite: RAD 313 and permission of the instructor. 

Provides the student with the introductory skills necessary to plan and calculate 
dosage for a range of treatment techniques. Treatment planning methods with and 
without computer assistance will be included. 

RAD 320 Clinical Education I (0-16-2) 

Pre-requisite: Formal admission to the program. 

Clinical experience in the application and delivery of radiation therapy. Orienta- 
tion to simulation, treatment planning, treatment delivery, and patient care activities 
within a radiation oncology department will be provided. 

RAD 321 Clinical Education II (0-24-3) 

Pre-requisite: RAD 320 and permission of the instructor. 

Clinical experience in the application and delivery of radiation therapy: simulation, 
planning, patient care, and delivery phases. Basic skills will be evaluated with 
clinical examinations designed to demonstrate competence. 

RAD 322 Clinical Education III (0-24-3) 

Pre-requisite: RAD 321 and permission of the instructor. 

Clinical experience in the application and deliverv of radiation therapy: simulation, 
planning, patient care, and delivery phases. Basic and advanced skills will be 
evaluated with clinical examinations designed to demonstrate competence. 

RAD 323 Clinical Education IV (0-32-4) 

Pre-requisite: RAD 322 and permission of the instructor. 

Clinical experience in the application and delivery of radiation therapy. Simula- 
tion, treatment planning, treatment delivery, and patient care skills will be refined. 
Advanced skills will be evaluated with clinical examinations designed to demon- 
strate competence. 



RESPIRATORY THERAPY 237 



Respiratory Therapy 

I .u ult\ 

bow ei B RO6S I Vp.11 tment I le.id 

Di Benedetto Robert ( o Medical Dire* toi 
Morris, Stephen ( o Medical Directoi 
smith William Directoi of C Linical Kim .it ion 
I lopper Keith 

F61 die two year (sei en conse< utive quarters) program leading to the Assot iate in 
& ience degree in Respirator) I herap) . die student must j omplete .1 ( unit ulum 
quarter hours inacademi< courses and <> (quartet hours within the major. I he \ S dt 
from an accredited Respirator) I herap) program qualifies the graduate forentrj into the 
Registry credentialing sj stem. I he Registry is the highest professional i redential avail- 
able in the field ot respirator) therap) I he t redentialing pre* ess is a two-step nationally 
administered examination step 1 is a comprehensive written exam to be taken shortly 
after graduation. I he graduate who passes this exam will earn the entry level credential 
(. R.T.T. and w ill be eligible to enter die registry credentialing system. I he registry exam 
consists o( a w rittenand a clinical simulation component. I he candidate who passes both 
parts ol the registry exam will earn the credential Registered Respirator) I herapist. I he 
( R.T.T. credential is the criteria required tor licensure by the State Board of Medical 
Examiners. 

PROGRESSION REQUIREMENTS 

1 or progression through the Associate Degree Program in Respiratory rherapy, the 

following must be maintained: 

1. Courses Related to the Major (CHE 201, 202, ZOO 208, 209, 211, BIO 210) 

a A student may carry no more than one grade of less than "C" 

b. A grade of "1" must be repeated the next quarter that the course is offered 

c. A student must have successfully completed the requirements tor CI If 202 
and ZOO 21 1 by the end of the summer quarter of the freshman \ear Failure 
to comply with this requirement will result in suspension from the program. 
A student suspended from the program will be eligible for readmission 

d. A student who must repeat more than one course because of a grade of 1 
will be dismissed from the program with no option tor readmission 

2 Courses in the Respiratory Therapy Major 

a. A grade of "C" or better is required for each course that is a prerequisite tor a 
subsequent course. Failure to comply with this requirement will result in 
suspension from the program. 

b. A student who earns a grade of less than "C" must repeat that course the 
next quarter it is offered. 

c. A student may repeat a respiratory therapy course only once 

d. Students who must repeat a respiratory therapy course more than one time 
will be dismissed from the program with no option for readmission 

e. Students who must repeat more than one respiratory therapy course will be 
dismissed from the program with no option for readmission. 

3. Grade Point Axerage 

The maintenance of a 2.0 GPA is desirable throughout the respiratory therapy 
program. Students who fall below 2.0 are subject to the academic status classifi- 
cation identified in the Academic Regulations section of this catalog. Students 
placed on academic Warning who do not raise their GPA to the minimum 
criteria for academic Good Standing the subsequent quarter will be suspended 
from the program until such time they return to Good Standing. Courses used 
to raise the GPA must be approyed by their academic ad\isor. 



238 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



4. Regents Exam 

Successful completion of the Regent's Exam is a requirement for all students 
receiving a degree from the University System of Georgia. The School of Health 
Professions requires that a student must have passed both parts of the Regent's 
Exam prior to their last quarter in their major. Failure to comply with this 
requirement will result in suspension from the program until such time that the 
exam is successfully completed. 

5. Exit Exam 

The University System of Georgia requires that all students take a comprehen- 
sive Exit Exam in their major field. The department of respiratory therapy uses a 
nationally validated exam for this purpose. The exit exam is administered 
during the spring quarter of the sophomore year. All students are required to 
pass this exam prior to the end of the spring quarter. 

PROGRAM FOR THE DEGREE OF ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE IN 
RESPIRATORY THERAPY 

Hours 

A. General Requirements 59 

Area 1 10 

1. ENG 101, 102 10 

Area II 5 

1. MATH 101 5 

Area III 15 

1. HIS 251 or 252 5 

2. POS113 5 

3. PSY 101 or SOC 201 or ANT 201 5 

Area IV 26 

1. CHE 201, 202 8 

2. ZOO 208, 209, 211 13 

3. BIO 210 5 

AreaV 3 

1. PE 117 or 166 2 

2. PE Activity Course 1 

B. Courses in the Major Field 63 

1. RT 100, 110, 113, 114, 115, 116, 120, 121 32 

2. RT 211, 221, 212, 215, 216, 222, 217, 223 31 

C. Regent's and National Standardized 

Self Assess Exams 

TOTAL 122 

Course Offerings 

RT 100 Medical Terminology (3-0-3) 

Offered: Fall quarter. 

A study of the language of medicine: word construction; definition; abbreviations 
and symbols; and use of terms related to all areas of medical science, hospital 
service and the medical specialties. Open to non-majors. 

RT 110 Patient Assessment (4-2-5) 

Prerequisite: ZOO 208, CHE 201. 

Offered: Winter Quarter. 

The primary goal of RT 110 is to teach the student the assessment skills required to 

evaluate and develop a respiratory care plan. By the completion of RT 110 the 

student will be able to: review the medical record, conduct a patient interview, 

perform a physical examination of the chest, monitor and interpret vital signs, 



RESPIRATORY THERAPY 239 



• rm ventilator) monitoring procedures interpret arterial * 
Interpret the ^in-st \ ra) iiu- content «•» Rl no ii eessntiaJ ti> ii ■ 
progression to the clinical phaae ol the curriculum 

R i 113 Respirator) rherap) Equipment (3-2 i 1 

Prerequisite ( Ml 202 Rl 1 10 

red Spring Quartet 
\ v ourse designed to flo< us on flu- te< hnolog) and equipment used In pr.'\ iding 
respirator) 1 are i he student \n ill be able to selei t and obtain equipment appropri 
ate to the< are plan assemble and t he< kfoi proper run uonand identity and< 
equipment malfunctions Qualit) control and asepsis procedures will also be 
emphasized 

Rl 114 General Patient C are (9-2-4) 

Prere q uisite K I 110. 

requisite Rl 1 15, R*l 113, 120. 
Offered: Spring Quarter. 

\ course designed to focus on implementation and evaluation ol tin- respirator) 
plan I he student will develop tin- cognitive and tec hrucal skills ne< easar) to 
initiate and evaluate the patient's response to: 02 therapy, c PR, aerosol and 
humidity therap) , bronchial hygiene, IPPB therapy m^\ airwa) care. A protocol tor 
initiating a change in the care plan will also be emphasized. 

RT 120 Applied Patient Care (0-8-2) 

Prerequisite: KI 110. 
Corequisite: KI 114, 113, 115. 
Offered: Spring Quarter. 
A clinical practicum designed to orient the student to the hospital envi r o n ment 

Bask assessment skills and 02 rounds will be emphasized, students will also 
participate in the cleaning, sterilization, assembly, mmA routine maintenance of 
equipment 

RT 115 Pulmonary Pharmacology (5-0-5) 

Prerequisites: /CX^» 204, CHE 202, RT 110. 
Offered: Summer Quarter. 

I his course is designed to give the student an in-depth look at drugs that directly 
affect the pulmonar\ system. During this course the student will study: route of 
drug administration pharmacodynamics, drug interactions, mucokinesis and 
mocokinetic d rugs, bronchospasm and bronchodi la tors, cholinergic d rugs cromolvn 
sodium, corticosteroids, antibiotics, antitiberculan drugs, respiratory stimulants 
and depressants, anesthetics and neuromuscular blockers. 

RT 121 Applied Respiratory Care I (0-16-4) 

Prerequisites: RT 120. 
Offered: Summer Quarter 

The primary goal of RT 121 is to provide the student sufficient opportunities to 
applv the cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills developed in RT 1 10 and RT 
111 in the clinical setting. By the completion of this course the student will be able 
to: collect data necessary for developing the care plan, implement the prescribed 
care plan, evaluate the patient's response to therapy and modify or recommend 
modificationof the care plan based on patient response. By the completion of RT 121 
the student will be able to demonstrate problem solving skills in the clinical setting. 
The clinical competencies developed in RT 121 area prerequisite for progression to 
the critical care component of the curriculum. 

RT 116 Diagnostic Procedures (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: ZOO 211, RT 110. 
Offered: Summer Quarter. 

The primary goal of RT 116 is to teach the student the cognitive and psychomotor 
skills necessary to perform or assist the physician in performing diagnostic proce- 
dures in the blood gas, pulmonary function and cardiovascular labs. 
The student will also develop competencies in cardiovascular assessment. By the 
completion of this course the student will be able to interpret diagnostic data and 
apply it to patient care. 



240 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



RT 211 Adult Critical Care I (4-3-5) 

Prerequisites: RT 116, RT 121. 

Offered: Fall Quarter. 

The primary goal of RT 211 is to teach the student the cognitive and psychomotor 

skills necessary to establish and maintain the patient ventilator system. Emphasis 

will be on knowledge of ventilatory support equipment as well as techniques for 

initiation assessment modification and discontinuation of ventilatory support 

systems. The content of RT 211 is essential for progression to RT 212. 

RT 221 Applied Respiratory Care II (0-16-4) 

Prerequisites: RT 116, RT 121. 

Offered: Fall Quarter. 

The primary goal of RT 221 is to provide the student sufficient opportunities to 

apply the cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills developed in RT 116 and RT 

21 1 in the clinical setting. Emphasis will be placed on developing clinical competen- 
cies in the ICU, diagnostic lab and operating room setting. 

RT 212 Adult Critical Care II (3-0-3) 

Prerequisites: RT 211, RT 221. 
Offered: Winter Quarter. 

The primary goal of RT 212 is to teach the student how to evaluate the effect of 
mechanical ventilation on other organs or body systems and to apply that knowl- 
edge to the total care of the patient. The student will develop a broader base for 
understanding the total patient care plan. Emphasis will be placed on hemody- 
namic monitoring, critical care pharmacology, fluid balance, shock and trauma. 

RT 222 Applied Respiratory Care III (0-16-4) 

Prerequisites: RT 211, RT 221. 

Offered: Winter Quarter. 

The primary goal of RT 222 is to provide the student with sufficient opportunities 

to apply the cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills developed in RT 21 1 and RT 

212 to the care of the critically ill patient. The emphasis will be placed on patient 
monitoring and evaluating the effect of therapeutic procedures on other organs or 
body systems. The student will begin an orientation rotation to the Pediatric and 
Neonatal ICUs during this course. 

RT 215 Perinatal Care (4-2-5) 

Prerequisites: RT 211, 221. 
Offered: Winter Quarter. 

The primary goal of RT 215 is to teach the student the cognitive, affective and 
psychomotor skills necessary to care for the critically ill pediatric patient and 
neonate. Emphasis will be placed on knowledge of ventilatory support equipment 
as well as techniques for initiation assessment, modification and discontinuation of 
ventilatory support systems. The student will also study embryology, assessment 
of the fetus in utero, complicated pregnancies and deliveries, resuscitation of the 
newborn and abnormal pathophysiologic states. 

RT 216 Cardiopulmonary Medicine (4-0-4) 

Prerequisites: RT 211, 221. 
Offered: Winter Quarter. 

The primary goal is to focus on the pathophysiology associated with cardiopulmo- 
nary diseases or conditions commonly seen in the hospital setting. Emphasis will 
be placed on assessment, rapid recognition, intervention and management of 
potential life-threatening conditions. Emphasis will be placed on developing deci- 
sion making and problem solving skills. 



RESPIRATORY THERAPY 241 



ki 223 Applied Respirator) ( tic i\ (0 16 I) 

Prerequisites Ki 212 Rl 216 Rl 21 i,RT2 

ii tei 
I In- primary goal of Rl 223 is to provide the student with sufficient opportunities 
to sppl) cognith e affective and psychomotoi skills m tin- i are . >f the critically ill 
neonate and pediatrU patienl Emphasis will be placed on care of patients requiring 
ventilator) support Students will continue to develop t J >« i r skills in tin- adult 
critical < are unit I he student will also be oriented to the care ot the< hronicall) ill 
patient in tin- home orsecondar) carefadlit) 

ki 217 Seminal In Respirator) Care (2-0-2) 

Prerequisites KI 212, KI 216, Rl 

Spi ing Quai tei 
I In* primar) goal of Rl 217 is to provide an open forum (<>■ discussion of < ontem* 
porar) issues fa< ing the profession and the health care deliver) system I opus to 
be discussed in< lude credentialing, gerontolog) and the health < are needs of tin- 
elderl) . the shift in focus from primar) tose< ondar) carefa< ilities,< .irn»t \ entilator 
dependent patients in the home and the impact of DRG's and the prospective 
pa) ment system on the traditional respiratory i arc sen u e 



242 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 






*** ' 



244 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



International Intercultural Studies Program 

The International Intercultural Studies Program (IISP) of the University System of 
Georgia provides students with a multitude of opportunities to study abroad while 
earning academic credit toward completion of degree requirements at their home 
campus. The IISP currently offers summer study abroad programs in Western Europe, 
the Soviet Union, Israel, Canada, and Mexico, and quarter, semester, and academic year 
opportunities in several countries in Western Europe. In 1989 approximately 350 partici- 
pants enrolled in one of these programs. 

Studying abroad enables students to increase knowledge of a foreign language, 
provides the opportunity to gain insights into and appreciation for the cultures and 
institutions of other peoples, facilitates the development of relevant career skills, and 
contributes to personal maturity, a sense of independence, self-knowledge, and confi- 
dence. 

IISP programs are open to all undergraduate students with a minimum cumulative 
GPA of 2.5; however, certain programs may require a higher GPA and completion of 
prerequisites. Graduate students are required to have a 3.0 GPA. Students in the 
University System of Georgia who are eligible for financial aid may use that aid toward 
IISP programs. A limited number of scholarships are available from some System 
institutions. For further information, see the Vice President and Dean of Faculty, or 
contact the IISP directly at 1 Park Place South Building, Suite 817, Atlanta, GA 30303. 
Telephone: 404-651-2450. 

The Freshman Experience 

Freshman Orientation Program 

In order to assist freshman students in making the transition to college, the college 
encourages new students to enroll in ASC 101. In addition to the course content, enrolled 
students will receive special advising and other services. The course is described as 
follows: 

ASC 101 College: Strategies for Success (3-0-3) 

This course aims to provide the student with the skills, information, and guidance 
useful for success in college. It will focus on the purposes of higher education, the 
roles of the student, and the resources available within the college for academic 
success and career choices. 

Learning Support Program 

To assure that students receive the required academic assistance before or as they 
attempt Core Curriculum courses, the college may create Learning Support courses. 
Students may be required to participate in such courses in order to enhance their chances 
for success in college level courses. Some restrictions apply to students who are required 
by the college to participate in the Learning Support Program. 



DEVELOPMENTAL STUDIES 



245 



\K Mill. in, ( harlotte 
Remlei Nan< \ 
Ku hardson, I dwin 
Smith, c arol) n 
I esserna, c leorge 



Developmental Studies 

I .u ult\ 

c leoffro) ^ j nthia I department I lead 

Childress, Beth 
I Hbi i tonna 

Harris kail 

[ones l tianne 
|o6ten I Vnk e 

I"he Department ol Developmental Studies provides a program ol compensator) 
education tor students w hose academic deficiencies may prevent successful completion 
ol collegiate studies Students may be placed in departmental ( ourses on the basis o( tin 1 
Collegiate Placement I xarnination 01 Regents res! performances. Regularly admitted 
students ma) in accordance with the policies ol the Developmental Studies Program, 
enroll, subject to prerequisites! in an) departmental courses. Conditionally admitted 
students must enroll in accordance with the stipulations ol their admission (see the 
Conditional Admission section of this Catalog) and policies of the Developmental 
Studio^ program. (Sec next section.) 

I hose entitled to Veterans Administration educational bond its may be certified for no 
more than 45 credit hours m departmental courses, it these courses are required for 
regular admission. At most, 1 5 hours may be certified in each ol the English, ma thematic s, 
and reading areas. 

Policies of the Developmental Studies Program 

I very time a Developmental Studies student registers or preregisters until exiting the 
1 V\ elopmentaJ Studies Program, he she must have his/her class schedule approved hv 
a Developmental Studies advisor or the Developmental Studies Counselor. 

The student is permitted tour attempts to exit a Developmental Studies area. If a 
student fails to exit an area after the fourth attempt, he/she will be subject to Develop- 
mental Studies suspension. 

A complete list o\ Developmental Studies Program Policies is available in the Depart- 
ment of Developmental Studies. 

Offerings 

DSE 098 Grammar Review (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

This course is for the student who needs to review grammar Fundamentals, to 
improve sentence writing skills, and to develop paragraphs. I he student works 
toward competence in sentence construction, verb use, determination of subject- 
verb agreement, formation of possessives, punctuation, and other basics. Along 
with reviewing grammar, the student engages in extensive writing practice, includ- 
ing sentence building, sentence combining, and paragraph writing. 

DSE 099 Basic Composition (5-0-5) 

Prerequisite: See Developmental Studies Policies above. 
Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

This course is tor the student who has already mastered the basic skills of compo- 
sition but who needs additional practice in developing the essay. It will help the 
student construct more mature and sophisticated sentence patterns, create coher- 
ent and well developed paragraphs, and organize paragraphs into essays. 

DSM 098 Introductory Algebra (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

This course offers a review o\ arithmetic integrated into an introductory algebra 
course. Topics include operations on signed numbers and simple polynomials, 
integer exponents, equations, word problems, factoring, some graphing, and 
simple radicals. 



246 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



DSM 099 Intermediate Algebra (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

Prerequisite: See Developmental Studies Policies above. 

Topics include rational expressions, factoring, linear equations and inequalities, 
quadratic equations, word problems, graphs of linear functions, rational expo- 
nents, and radicals. 

DSR 098 Reading Skills (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

This course offers a review of the basic reading skills needed by college students 
having difficulty with college level material. Areas to be covered include vocabu- 
lary development (word parts, context, denotation and connotation), main ideas, 
supporting details, organizational and rhetorical patterns, transitions, tone, pur- 
pose, fact and opinion, and inferential skills. 

DSR 025 Developing Reading Maturity (5-0-5) 

Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer. 

This course is appropriate for students preparing for the Regents Examination, for 
students undergoing remediation due to unsuccessful performance on the reading 
portion of the Regents Examination, and for students experiencing moderate 
difficulty in reading. Comprehension skills, vocabulary enrichment, test-taking 
strategies, and reading fluency are stressed. 

Military Science 

Faculty 

Scott, Daniel, Major, Department Head 

Johnson, Joseph, Captain Bryant, George, Master Sergeant 

Batalona, Wesley, Sergeant First Class 

The Army Department of Military Science is a Senior Division Reserve Officer 
Training Corps (ROTC), Instructor Group, staffed by active Army personnel. The 
department provides a curriculum available to Armstrong State and Savannah State 
students that qualifies the college graduate for a commission as an officer in the United 
States Army, United States Army Reserve, or the United States National Guard. Quali- 
fying for a commission adds an extra dimension to the student's employment capability 
in that, upon graduation from the college, the student has either military or civilian 
employment options. Enrollment in Military Science classes is open to all students. 

The course of study offered in military science is designed not only to prepare both the 
student for service as a commissioned officer in the United States Army but also to 
provide knowledge and practical experience in leadership and management that will be 
useful in any facet of society. Male and female students are eligible for enrollment. Each 
student is provided with a working knowledge of the organization and functioning of the 
Department of Defense and the role of the U.S. Army in national security and world 
affairs. 

The course of study pursued by students during their freshman and sophomore years 
is the basic military science course and /or related skill activities. The course of study 
normally pursued by students during their junior and senior years is the advanced 
military science course. 

For selection and retention in the advanced course, a student must be physically 
qualified, should have maintained above average military and academic standing, and 
must demonstrate a potential for further leadership development. 

Graduates of the advanced course are commissioned second lieutenants in the United 
States Army, United States Army Reserve, or the United States National Guard in the 
branch of service most appropriate to their interests and academic achievements, 
consistent with the needs of the Army. Regardless of the Branch selected, all officers will 



MILITARY SCIENCE 247 



receive valuable experience in management l< ind administration Graduatt 

ma) be granted a dela) in reporting for dut) for graduate study, if requested 
numbei ol outstanding students are designated I tistinguished Military ( Iradu 
are offered commissions In the Regulai Amu each yeai 



all 



Basic Military Science 



Basi< m iht. n \ science courses involve six quarters during the freshman and sopho 
more years rhe studenl learns leadership and managemenl and acquires i-ssi-nti.il 
ba< kground knowledge of < ustoms and traditions, weapons, map reading, tat ins and 
survival Equall) important, these ( ourses have the objective of developing the student's 
self-discipline, integrit) and sense ol responsibility 

Advanced Military Science 

I he general objecth eoi this course of instruction is to produce junior of fi< era who by 
education, braining, attitude and inherent qualities are suitable for continued develop- 
ment as officers in the Army. I here are two avenues available forthestudent to be eligible 
tor entry into the .uh anced program and obtain a commission .is a second lieutenant, 
(a) satisfactory completion of, or placemenl credil tor. the bask program .it Armstrong 

State oral any other school, college or unh ersit) offering basic ROTC and meeting the 

entrance and retention requirements established bj the Arm) . 
(b)to be an active dut) veteran or junior ROTC cadet graduate eligible for placement 

credit. 

Placement 

Veterans entering the military science programs will receive appropriate placement 
credit for their actne military service. Students who have completed military science 
courses in military preparatory schools or junior colleges may be given appropriate 
credit. Students with at least three years of high school ROTC may also be granted 
placement credit. Placement credit or six quarters of basic militarv science, or the 
equivalent thereof, is a prerequisite to admission into the advanced program. 

Alternate Programs for Admittance 

Students with two years of coursework remaining, but who have not completed basic 
military science, are eligible to be considered for selection into the advanced military 
science program. Those selected under the provisions of the two-year advanced program 
must satisfactorily complete a basic summer camp of six weeks duration prior to entering 
the advanced program. Students attending the basic camp at Fort Knox, Kentucky, are 
paid at active army rates and given a travel allowance from their home to camp and 
return. Attendance at Basic Camp is voluntary and incurs no militarv obligation until the 
student returns and decides to sign a contract to pursue a commission. 

Participating Students and Aliens 

Participating students are students who participate in Military Science courses hut are 
not fully enrolled or are ineligible for enrollment in the ROTC programs. Participating 
and alien students may enroll in the Militarv Science classes provided they meet the 
requirements outlined in Army Regulations and are approved by the Department Head 
and /or school authorities. Although these students may enroll in military science classes 
they may only participate in classroom instructions. Thev will not participate in any high 
risk training, drill, marching, leadership laboratories, field training exercises, voluntary 
programs, or attend basic or advanced camp. These students will also not be issued or 
wear the uniform, nor receive credit toward commissioning or enlisted grade status 
through completion of ROTC courses. 



248 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

Advanced Summer Camp 

Students contracting to pursue the advanced courses are required to attend advanced 
summer camp, normally between their junior and senior academic years at Fort Bragg, 
North Carolina. 

Financial Assistance 

All contracted advanced course cadets are paid a subsistence allowance of $100 per 
month while enrolled in the advanced course. 

Scholarship Program 

Each year the U.S. Army awards two- and three-year scholarships to outstanding 
young men and women participating in the Army ROTC program who desire careers as 
Army officers. The Army pays tuition, fees, books and laboratory expenses incurred by 
the scholarship student. In addition, each student receives $100 per month for the 
academic year. Individuals desiring to compete for these scholarships should apply to the 
Military Science Department. 

Army ROTC Uniforms, Books and Supplies 

Students enrolling in the Army ROTC program will be issued U.S. Army uniforms, 
books and supplies by the Military Science Department. No fees or deposits of any kind 
will be required. Uniforms must be returned before commissioning or upon disenrollment 
from the ROTC program. 

MIL Courses 

The basic course of six quarters duration consists of two hours of instruction work per 
week. Students acquire knowledge of military leadership, weapons, tactics, basic mili- 
tary skills, and physical fitness. In field training exercises, potential for leadership is 
progressively developed. Basic course students are invited and encouraged to attend 
military science leadership laboratories and physical training sessions. 

The advanced course consists of three hours of classroom work and one hour of 
leadership laboratory per week. During the spring quarter prior to advanced camp the 
student will enroll in MIL 323 to prepare for attendance at Advanced Camp. HIS 357 
(American Military History) is normally taken spring quarter of the senior year. The 
coursework during the advanced course emphasizes techniques and management and 
leadership and the fundamentals and dynamics of the military team. Field training 
exercises provide the student with applied leadership experiences. Participation in 
leadership laboratories and physical training sessions are mandatory. 

Professional Military Education (PME) Requirements 

The Army's Professional Military Education requirements are established to provide 
cadets with the training and enrichment necessary to successfully compete in the Army. 
In addition to completing a baccalaureate degree, the cadet must complete one under- 
graduate course from each of the five designed fields of study (Some of these requirements 
may be waived for nursing majors). The five PME designated fields of study are listed 
below and the courses that meet the Cadet Command PME requirement: 

A. Written Communications Skills: ENG 101, ENG 102, and ENG 192. 

B. Human Behavior: PSY 101, SOC 201, HIS 114, HIS 115, and ANT 201. 

C. Math Reasoning: MAT 101 and MAT 103. 

D. Military Historv: HIS 357. 

E. Computer Literacy: CS 115, CS 120, CS 142, and CS 296. 



MILITARY SCIENCE 249 



Minor Concentration 

rhe department offers a minoi in Military s » ience rhe program i I to prepare 

the student for a commission in the I nited States Vrm) and is offered to but not required 
ol those students participating in tlu- advanced course of Amu ROT< instruction 
Whatevei themajoi a Militar) Science minor will strengthen the student's management, 
leadership and interpersonal communication skills, rhe minoi requii 

rwenty< redit hours ^ ith grades ol t orbettei ih.hu of the follow inguppei dh ision 
militar) science courses 121 123 and HIS 

Offerings 

\lll 121 Introduction to Mountaineering (1-2-2) 

Prerequisite: Enrollment is restricted to KO I c -eligible freshmen (and sophomores 
who are compressing \i s i and \l s ll level courses) who desire to pursue to 
commission in the l .S Armj . 

Instruction and practical exercises introducing the tumi.uiifnt.ils ol mountaineer- 
ing (climbing, rappelling, belaying, and rope-bridging techniques). I mphasis is 
placed on knot-t) ing, safety procedures, and the use oi group dynamics to expand 
the learning experience in .1 wilderness environment. One weekend field trip is 
required. Acceptable as a P.E. requirement. 

MIL 122 Introduction to the Army (2-1-2) 

Instruction provides a basic understanding to the L S. Army and its role in national 
defense, rhe course includes a study of the Army RO K organization and braru hes 
oi the I s Army, map reading, customs and traditions ol rhe service, military 

writing, physical fitness, leadership drill and ceremonies, conduct ,-\no\ inspection, 
role of the Army National Guard and Army Reserves, and the role of the non- 
commissioned officer. I his course includes a mandatory leadership laboratory for 
students pursuing a commission. 

MIL 123 Basic Military Leadership (2-1-2) 

Instruction covers the fundamentals of Army leadership and management tech- 
niques. I his is accomplished through lectures and discussions on leadership and 
management theories, special readings, and student presentations. One weekend 
held training exercise (FTX) and attendance at leadership laboratory are mandatory 
for students pursuing a commission. 

MIL 221 Land Navigation/Map Reading (2-1-2) 

This course consists oi a study of Land Navigation to include map reading and 
orientation, including practical land navigation exercises. Attendance at leadership 
laboratory is encouraged for students pursuing a commission. 

MIL 222 Individual Military Skills (2-1-2) 

This course consists of the study of and practical application of basic militar) skills 
to include hasic first aid, survival, and individual tactical skills. Attendance at 
leadership laboratory is encouraged for students pursuing a commission. 

MIL 223 Basic Tactics (2-1-2) 

This course consists of a study of basic organization, tactics, and operational 
procedures executed at the (Light Infantry) platoon level. This course includes a 
mandatorv leadership laboratory tor students pursuing a commission. 

MIL 225 Basic Military Skills Practicum (V-V-5) 

Summer. Prerequisite: Must be an academic sophomore or junior. 
A six-week training and leadership development program which will qualify 
students for entry into the ROTC advanced course of study. Encampment and 
training is conducted at Ft. Knew, KY. Grading tor this course will be done on a 
satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Instruction and evaluation is accomplished by 
U.S. Army personnel assigned to the U.S. Army ROTC Cadet Command. 



250 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



MIL 321 Advanced Tactics I (3-2-3) 

Prerequisites: Completion of the Basic Course or equivalent and approval of the 
Department Head. 

Instruction and practical exercises on the fundamentals of leadership and leaders 
role in directing individuals and small units in offensive and defensive tactics. 
Emphasis is placed on developing and executing orders under a given scenario, and 
troop leading procedures. Land navigation and communication subjects are in- 
cluded in the course. This course includes a mandatory leadership laboratory and 
attendance at physical training sessions. 

MIL 322 Advanced Tactics II (3-2-3) 

Prerequisites: Completion of the Basic Course or equivalent and approval of the 
Department Head. 

Instruction and practical exercises on the fundamentals of leadership and the 
leader's role in directing small and large units in offensive and defensive tactics. 
Emphasis is placed on squad tactical reaction, patrolling techniques, and conduct- 
ing after-action reviews. This course includes a mandatory leadership laboratory 
and attendance at physical training sessions. 

MIL 323 Advanced Military Leadership (3-2-3) 

Prerequisites: Completion of the Basic Course or equivalent and approval of the 
Department Head. 

Instruction and practical exercises on management, leadership, and motivation 
techniques which relate to both civilian and military environments. Emphasis is 
placed on Green lab leadership and leadership assessment. Course includes sub- 
jects deemed necessary as final preparation for advanced summer training. This 
course includes a mandatory leadership laboratory and attendance at physical 
training sessions. 

MIL 325 Military Skills Practicum (V-V-5) 
Summer. 

Prerequisites: MIL 323 and approval of the Department Head. 
The study and practical application of military skills and leadership ability during 
a six-week encampment experience. Grading for this course will be done on a 
satisfactory /unsatisfactory basis. Instruction and evaluation is jointly accom- 
plished by Department staff and selected ROTC personnel assigned to 1st Region. 

MIL 421 Command and Staff Operations (3-2-3) 

Prerequisites: MIL 321 and 322 or approval of the Department head. 
This course provides the MS IV cadet with instruction in the Army Command and 
staff functions. Military and professional knowledge topics include: write in the 
Army style, write an After Action Report, oral communications, conduct briefings, 
prepare to and conduct training, evaluate training, and the Leadership Assessment 
Program. Attendance at leadership laboratory and physical training sessions is 
mandatory. 
MIL 422 Leadership and Management (3-2-3) 

Prerequisites: MIL 321 and 322 or approval of the Department Head. 
This course consists of study of military law, the law of war and basic professional 
knowledge an individual needs in order to be a professional officer. Attendance at 
Leadership Laboratory and physical training sessions is mandatory. 

MIL 423 Transition to an Army Lieutenant (1-3-2) 

Prerequisites: MIL 321 and 322 or approval of the Department Head. 
This course prepares and assists MS IV cadets in their transition from cadet/student 
to commissioned officer/professional. Attendance at leadership laboratory and 
physical training sessions is mandatory. 



NAVAL ROTC PROGRAM 251 



Naval ROTC Program 

i acuity 

c I >R \.',n,i \i rellis i s \ i Apartment I lead 

CDR1 dward I Kriewaldt, I s \ LI Grant Sbrocco, I 5N 

\i \l l dwin i ielder i SMC I l Bernard Do toi I SN 

General 

Naval Resen e Officer I raining ( orps (NROTC I prepares students tori ommissioned 
sen i< e as regular ov resen e offi< ers in the Na> \ or Marine c orps 

Students enrolled in NROTC are referred to as Midshipmen (MIDN) or as Naval 
Science Students (NSS) and are classified based on Naval Science academic status t is 

follow s 

\Si Student NROTC Midshipmen 

Senior 1 /C (FirstC lass) 

[unior 2/C (Second c Kiss) 

Sophomore 3/C (Third c I 

Freshman 4/C (Fourth c Kiss) 

Naval Science Curriculum 

Basic Program 
\l 1 MIDSHIPMEN 

Hours 

A. Naval Science 24 

NSC 101,102, 103 9 

NSC 21D, 202, 203 13 

B. Advanced Program-Naw Option 20 

NSC 301, 302, 303 ' 12 

NSC 401, 402, 403 - 

C. Advanced Program-Marine Corps Option 14 

NSC 303, 304, 305 - 

NSC 404, 403 6 

D. Additional and Substitute Requirements 

NSC 450 Naval Drill (0-2-0), required each academic term bv all midshipmen. 
NSC 103, 303, and 450 satisfies 6 hours of physical education requirements. 

E. Navy Scholarship Midshipmen 

(1) Requirements 

Math 206-207-208 (to be completed by end of Sophomore Year) 1 5 

Physics 217-218-219 (to be completed by the end of Junior Year) 18 

Computer Science 136 or 142 or 246 or 120 3 

Must complete HIS 357 and PSC 201 (SSC) 10 

Must complete one academic term in a major Indo-European or 

Asian Language prior to commissioning 3 



252 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 

(2) Navy Option in a non-technical curricula shall complete a sufficient 
number of technical electives from the below list to comprise 50 per- 
cent of all electives not required by the academic major or NROTC 
Program. Calculus and Physics courses count towards satisfying this 
requirement: 

Business (SSC): BAD 331, 332, 416 
Chemistry: any listed course 

Math, Physics, Physical Science: any listed courses except Math 290, 391, 
and 393. 

Computer Science: CS 120, 136, 142, 246 
Engineering Courses: Any listed course except EGR 100, 170, 171 

Navy College Program Midshipmen (nonscholarship) 

Must complete 1 year of Math, college algebra or higher, by the end of the Junior Year 
and 1 year Physical Science by the end of the Senior Year as a requisite for commissioning. 
The Physical Science requirement can be met by completing a one-year sequence, or two 
courses, in any area of physical science. One Mathematics course may be selected from 
the fields of computer science or statistics. 

Marine Corps Option 

All students shall take, during the Junior or Senior year, HIS 201 and PSC 201 (SSC). 
(Courses must be approved by the Marine Corps Officer Instructor and should not create 
an academic overload (increase time required for degree completion/commissioning 
and /or require student to carry more than 18 hours). 

NROTC Uniforms, Books, and Instructional Materials 

Will be issued at no cost to Naval Science students. Uniforms must be returned before 
commissioning or upon disenrollment from the NROTC Program; books and other 
instructional materials must be returned at the end of each academic term. 

Scholarship Program 

Two and three-and-a-half year scholarships that pay tuition, fees, books and labora- 
tory expenses, in addition, scholarship midshipmen also receive a $100 per month tax free 
stipend during the academic year. 

Financial Assistance 

All midshipmen in the advanced NROTC Program (Junior and Senior Years) are paid 
a $100 per month tax free subsistence allowance (same as $100 per month stipend for 
scholarship midshipmen). 

Summer Training Cruises 

All scholarship midshipmen will go on Summer Training Cruises each year. While on 
summer training, midshipmen will be paid active duty Navy rates and will be provided 
travel, room and board at government expense. 

4 and 2- Year NROTC Programs 

4-year program students enroll in the program as Freshmen and participate until 
graduation. 

2-year program students enter the program after they complete approximately 90 
hours (end of Sophomore year) and complete a six-week professional, academic, and 
physical training program conducted each summer by the Navy, normally in Newport, 
RI and referred to as Naval Science Institute (NSI). Academic work at the Naval Science 
Institute is the equivalent of the NROTC basic course and 18 hours of credit will be given 
to students who successfully complete NSI. 



NAVAL ROTC PROGRAM 253 



Naval Science Offerings 

\s( 101 Introduction to Naval Science (2-1-3) 

Introduce midshipmen to NROTX Program mission, organization, r< 

and broad warfare components ol the naval lervice Included i 

officei and enlisted rank and rating structure, training and education promotion 

and ad> ancement, and reti r e m ent policies rhe course also coven run .«l co 

and customs, a study of the organization of the naval service, career oppo r tunities, 

and the duties ol a Junior Officei In the naval service. Students are familiarized with 

tin- major challenges fa< Ing toda) s run .il offu er, rspct ially in tin- areas <>t . 

ship and hum. m resoun es mana g ement I .ill. \\ inter 

\sc 102 Seapowei and Maritime Affairs (5-0-5) 

A* survey of American Naval and Maritime history from the Ajnerican Revolution 
to me present with emphasis on major de> elopments. Attention will be fo< used on 
Mahan's geopolitical theory; economic and maritime tones, i s military 
maritime strategy; and .1 comparator e anal) sis 01 Ament an and s <>\ iet maritime 
strategies. Winter 

NSC 103 Basic Sailing I (Classroom) (1-1-1) 

A basic foundation course that provides students with the tund.iment.il knowledge 
and skills to be a competent crew member. I he course covers the basic theory ol 
sailing, nomenclature, seamanship, boat equipment ^d safety, ^nd inland waters 
navigation rules tor sailing craft. An "A" crew qualification will be issued upon 

completion. Prerequisite: Student must be .1 certified third class swimmers. Fall, 
Spring. (PI Credit) 

NSC 201/202 Navigation I & II (3-2-5) 

An in-depth Study of piloting and celestial navigation theory, principles, and 

procedures. Students learn piloting navigation: the use of charts, visual <M^d 
electronic aids, and the theory and operation of magnetic gyro compasses. C elestial 
navigation is covered in-depth including the celestial coordinate system, an intro- 
duction to spherical trigonometry, the theory and operation of the sextant, and a 
Step-by-Step treatment of the sight reduction process. Students develop practical 
skills in both piloting and celestial navigation. Other topics discussed include tides. 
currents, effects of wind and weather, plotting, use or navigation instruments, types 
and characteristics of electronic navigation systems. Fall, Winter sequent ■ 

NSC 203 Leadership and Management I (5-0-5) 

A comprehensive study of the principles and concepts of institutional manage- 
ment, organizational and human behavior, and effective leadership. Students will 
de\ elop additional knowledge and practical skills in the areas of communication 
theory and practices; Human Resources Management; Stress Management; Coun- 
sel ing; Group Dynamics; and the nature and dynamics ofindh id ua land institutional 
change, human resistance to change and the strategy for implementing change. 
Spring. (BAD 362 Organizational Theory and Behavior offered at the School of 
Business (SSC) will substitute for this course. 

NSC 301 Naval Ships Systems I (Engineering) (5-0-5) 

A detailed study oi ship characteristics and types including ship design, hydrody- 
namic forces, stability, compartmentation, propulsion, electrical and auxiliary 
systems, interior communications, ship control, and damage control. Basic con- 
cepts of the theory and design of steam, gas turbine, and nuclear propulsion, 
shipboard safety and firefighting are also covered. Spring. 

NSC 302 Naval Operations (5-0-5) 

A study of the international and inland rules of the nautical road, relative-motion 
vector-analysis theory, relative motion problems, formation tactics, and ship em- 
ployment. Also included is an introduction to Naval Operations and aspects of ship 
handling and afloat naval communication. Prerequisites: NSC 201-202. Winter. 



254 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



NSC 303 Intermediate Sailing (On-water) (1-3-2) 

Basic hands-on sail training leading to qualification as "B" skipper qualification. 
Practical skills to be mastered consist of rigging and sailing from a pier: sail to 
weather; sail two figure eight courses with two tacks and two jibes; man overboard 
maneuver; a capsize; and return to dock and secure. Prerequisites: NSC 103. Spring. 
(PE credit) 

NSC 304/305 Evolution of Warfare I & II (3-0-3) 

This course historically traces the development of warfare from the dawn of 
recorded history to the present, focusing on the impact of major militarv theorists, 
strategists, tacticians, and technological developments. Students acquire a basic 
sense of strategy, develop an understanding of military alternatives, and become 
aware of the impact of historical precedent on military thought and actions. Fall, 
Winter. 

NSC 306 Marine Corps Laboratory (0-3-0) 

A course for Marine Corps Option students which stresses the development of 
leadership, moral, and physical qualifications necessary for service as Marine 
Corps officers. Practical laboratory exercises in mission and organization of the 
Marine Corps, duties of interior guards, introduction to military tactics, troop 
leadership procedures, rifle squad weapons and theory of physical conditioning 
program. This course serves to prepare students for the Marine Corps Summer 
Training at Officer Candidate School (BULLDOG). Spring. 

NSC 401 Naval Ships Systems II (Weapons) (5-0-5) 

This course outlines the theory and employment of weapons systems. Students 
explore the processes of detection, evaluation, threat analysis, weapon selection, 
delivery, guidance, and naval ordinance. Fire control systems and major weapons 
types are discussed. The concepts of command-control-and- communications are 
explored as a means of weapons systems integration. Winter. 

NSC 402 Naval Operations Laboratory (0-1-0) 

Practical laboratory exercises conducted in a dynamic, composite and time oriented 
fleet environment to further develop and improve surface warfare skills for Navy 
Option midshipmen. Winter. 

NSC 403 Leadership and Management II (3-0-3) 

A study of the Management responsibilities of a junior Naval Officer. The course 
covers counseling methods, military justice administration, Naval human re- 
sources management, directives and correspondence, naval personnel, 
administration, material management and maintenance, and supply systems. This 
course builds on and integrates the professional competencies developed in prior 
course work and professional training. This course prepares final quarter midship- 
men for the personal and professional responsibilities of a Junior Officer reporting 
aboard and relieving. Prerequisite: NSC 203. Spring. 

NSC 404/405 Amphibious Warfare I & II (3-0-3) 

A historical survey of the development of amphibious doctrine and the conduct of 
amphibious operations. Emphasis is placed on the evolution of amphibious war- 
fare in the 20th century, especially during World War II. Present day potential and 
limitations on amphibious operations, including the rapid deployment force con- 
cept. Fall, Winter. 

NSC 450 Naval Drill (0-2-0) 

Introduces students to basic military formations, movements, commands, courte- 
sies and honors, and provides practice in Unit leadership and management. 
Physical conditioning and training are provided to ensure students meet Navy/ 
Marine Corps physical fitness standards. Successful completion of three quarters of 
this course by NROTC students satisfies the College's six hour Physical Education 
requirement. NSC 450 is required each quarter for all NROTC students (450.1 for 
Freshman and Sophomores; 450.2 for Junior and Seniors). 







. 



256 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY ROSTERS 



Permanent, Full-Time Members of the Teaching Corps or 
Administrative Staff 

(This list includes only individuals who have faculty voting privileges. The number 
in parentheses after the names represents the initial year of employment at Armstrong 
State College. Asterisk indicates full graduate faculty status.) 



* Adams, Joseph V. (1970) 
Dean of Arts and Sciences 
Professor of Psychology 

Ph.D., University of Alabama 

M.A., Baylor University 

B.A., Tennessee Temple College 

Aenchbacher, Louis E., Ill (1980) 

Associate Professor of Physical Education 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.Ed., University of Georgia 
B.S., Armstrong State College 

*Agyekum, Stephen K. (1979) 

Professor of Education 

Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.A., University of Georgia 
A.B., Johnson C. Smith University 

* Anderson, James N. (1985) 

Head of Art & Music Department 

Professor of Music 

Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin 
M.M., University of Houston 
B.M.E., Wichita State University 

* Andrews, Carol M. (1988) 

Associate Professor of English 
Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 
M.A., Vanderbilt University 
B.A., Furman University 

Applegate, Roberta (1993) 

Assistant Professor of Education 
Ph.D., University of Texas 
M.A., Michigan State University 
B.A., California Polytechnic State 
University 

*Arens, Olavi (1974) 

Professor of History 

Ph.D., Columbia University 
M.A., Columbia University 
A.B., Harvard University 

Awong-Taylor, Judy (1993) 

Assistant Professor of Biology 
Ph.D., University of Florida 
M.S., University of Florida 
B.S., University of the West Indies 

Baker, Julia G. (1987) 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

B.S., Furman Universitv 



Ball, Ardella P. (1968) 

Assistant Professor of Library Science 

Sc.D., Nova University 

M.S., Atlanta University 

A.B., Fisk University 

*Barnard, Jane T. (1980) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics and 

Computer Science 

Ed.S. Georgia Southern College 
M.S., Georgia Southern College 
B.S., Georgia Southern College 

*Battiste, Bettye A. (1980) 
Associate Professor of Education 
Ed.D., University of Florida 
M.Ed., State University of New York 
B.S., Savannah State College 

Bergin, Joyce (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Education 
Ed.D., East Texas State University 
M.Ed., William and Mary College 
B.A., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 

*Beumer, Ronald J. (1975) 

Professor of Biology 

Ph.D., University of Arkansas 
B.S., University of Dayton 

Bjorn, Edith (1990) 

Associate Professor of Education 
Ph.D., State University of New York 
M.S., State University of New York 
M.Ed., East Stroudsburg State College 
B.S., East Stroudsburg State College 

Bowers, Ross L., Ill (1979) 

Head of Respiratory Therapy Department 

Assistant Professor of Respiratory Therapy 

MHS, Armstrong State College 

B.S., Georgia State University 

Brewer, John G. (1968) 

Coordinator of Chemistry 
Professor of Chemistry 

Ph.D., University of Georgia 

M.S., University of Georgia 

B.S., University of Georgia 

Brower, Moonyean S. (1967) 

Associate Professor of Biology 
M.A., University of Massachusetts 
B.S., Universitv of Massachusetts 



FACULTY 



257 



Brown George I 1 1 

iminal |ustk c 

S V\ \tl.ml.i l m\eisit\ 
\\ \imMi,-iu; s t .,t«- (. ol I 
\ B \iiUNtionv-, M.itr < > 

Brush Sabltra S (1* 

Assistant Professoi ni c hemistr) 
I'h l) I lorida State 1 niversit) 
\1 S l loi Ida State I ni\ »i ^it \ 
r> I \ I niversit) ol the Wesl Indies 

Buck loaeph v 111 (1968) 

\ ice President foi Student Vffairs 

I J I > I iu\ ersit) ol ( leoi gia 

\l S Florida State I niversit) 

B \ Vuburn I nh ersit) 

li.uk Marilyn M. (1974) 

I lead ol Baccalaureate Nursing I department 

Professor ol Nursing 
Id I > I nh ersit) ^ > t South (. arolina 
\1 S \ Medi< al c lollege ot <. leorgia 
B S \ Boston L nh ersit) 

Burgess c lifford \ . <i l >79) 
Professor ot 1 ducation 

Ed.D., Auburn Unh ersit) 

M.A., < leorge Peabod) 

AH . Mercer Unh ersity 

Burnett, Robert A. (1978) 
President 

Professor ot I hstor\ 
Ph.D., L niversit) of North Carolina 
\1 V. University ot North Carolina 
IV \ Wofford College 

'Butler 1 rank A. (1985) 

Vice President and Dean ot Faculty 
Professor ot Physics 

Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic 

B.S.1 .S .. I ni\ ersity ot Miami 

»>\kat. Alexander (1992) 

Callaway Professor of Computer Science 
Ph.D., Universit) of London 
\I S< I ni\ ersity of London 
l'\ iit\ or Leicester Polytechnic 

Byrd, James T. (1990) 

Assistant Professor ol Chemistry 

Ph.D., Florida State University 

\1 S.P.H., Universit) of North Carolina 

\ P. Um\ ersity of North Carolina 

C al dwell, Eva (1987) 
Assistant Professor of Nursing 

\l S V. Medical College ol Georgia 

B.S.N. Armstrong State Coll< 

Carpenter, Suzanne (1988) 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
M.S., University of North Carolina 
B.S., Auburn Universit) 
A. A., Lake-Sumter Junior College 



I henaull i 

• 
I'h I > l iu\ «-r sit\ ot Iowa 
\1 I I South I arolina State ( oll< 
South <■ arolin 

( Kild "i (1990) 

Assist. nit Pi 

\1 \ \l'U "l .'( V I IU\ 1 ! 

B \ remple i nh ersit\ 

( lai n\ I ..ink \l (19 

Assist. ml | hsh 

\1 \ . \ ill. mm ,i l m\ ersit) 
B s Villano\ .1 l ni\ ersit) 

( lark, Sandra 11 (1990) 
Assistant Profess* >i ot Nui 

\l S \ Medi< al t ollege ol < Georgia 

B.S.N., Armstrong State c olli 

( omaskey, Bernard |. (1966) 

Assistant Professor ol I listor\ 

\l \ Nev< ^ ork I niversit) 
B \ I ordham c ol • 

C onnor, Sat.i I . (1980) 

Assistant to the I )ean of I lealth Professii ins 

\-mk iate Professor ol Nursing 
I d.l )., I ni\ ersit) ol < leorgia 
M.S V. Medical College ol I leorgia 
B.S.N., Medi< al College of Georgia 

Conway, Marian (1987) 
Assistant Professor of Nursing 

\1 s N., Medical College ot c leorgia 

B.S V. ( leorgia College 

Cooksey, [nomas I . (1987) 
Associate Professor of English <.md 
Philosoph) 
Ph.D., university of Oregon 
\1 K., California Polytechnic State 

Uni\ ersit) 
l>. V. Unh ersity of California 

Cornell, Marsha (1989) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
M.S.N., I niversit) ol Evansville 
B.S.N., Uni\ ersit) ol I \ ans* ille 

Cosgrove, Maryellen S. (1989) 
Associate Professor ol 1 ducation 
Ph.D., Universit) of Connecticut 
M. \ . Universit) ol Connecticut 
B.S., I nh ersit) ol Connecticut 

Cottrell, Isabel D. (1992) 

Assistant Professor ot Spanish 
Ph.D.. Florida State University 
M.A., University ot Texas at Arlington 
l> \ . L niversity ol I exas al Austin 

Counsil, Roger L. (1991) 

\\v.-\d of the Division of Physical Education 

and Athletics and Athletic Director 

Professor ot Physical Education 
Ed.D., Indiana University 
M.S., Southern Illinois Universit) 
B.S., Southern Illinois University 



258 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Coursey, Teresa (1971) 

Assistant Professor of Dental Hygiene 
M.H.S., Armstrong State College 
B.S., West Liberty State College 

Cross, Deanna S. (1989) 

Head of Associate Degree Nursing 
Associate Professor of Nursing 

Ph.D., Boston College 

M.S.N., Boston College 

B.S.N. , University of Akron 

*Dandy, Evelyn B. (1974) 

Professor of Education 

Ph.D., University of South Carolina 
M.Ed., Temple Universitv 
B.S., Millersville State College 

Deaux, Patricia M. (1993) 

Assistant Professor of Library Science 
M.L.I.S., University of South Carolina 
B.F.A., University of Georgia 

Diaz, Donna P. (1991) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

M.S., University of Southern Mississippi 
B.S., Mississippi College 

Donahue, Michael E. (1993) 

Assistant Director, Public Service Center 
Associate Professor of Criminal Justice 
Ph.D., Michigan State University 
M.S., University of South Carolina 
B.A., University of North Carolina- 
Charlotte 

Douglass, W. Keith (1970) 

Professor of Psychology 
Ph.D., Syracuse University 
M.A., Syracuse University 
B.A., Franklin & Marshall College 

Dubus, Judy (1990) 

Reference / Bibliographic Instruction 

Librarian 

Assistant Professor of Library Science 

M.S., Florida State University 

A.B., University of Georgia 

*Duncan, John D. (1965) 

Professor of History 

Ph.D., Emory University 

M.A., University of South Carolina 

B.S., College of Charleston 

Dunn, Barbara (1994) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
M.S.N., St. Louis University 
B.S.N., Maryville College 

Dutko, Kathleen (1978) 
Assistant Professor of Nursing 

M.A., New York University 

B.S.N., Niagara University 

Edenfleld, Suzanne (1983) 

Assistant Professor of Dental Hygiene 
M.H.S., Armstrong State College 
B.S., Armstrong State College 



Esparza, Julia (1994) 

Reference/ Bibliographic Instruction 
Librarian 

M.L.S., Indiana University 

B.A., University of Evansville 

Findeis, John (1968) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

M.S., University of Illinois 

B.S., University of Illinois 

Ford, Elizabeth J. (1976) 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

M.Ed., Georgia Southern College 

B.S., Winthrop College 

Frazier, Douglas R. (1991) 

Assistant Professor of Library Science 
M.L.S., University of Washington 
B.A., Western Washington State College 

Gehrm II, John A. 

Executive Director, Office of College 
Advancement 

M.Ed. Salisbury State University 

B.S. Salisbury State University 

Geoffroy, Cynthia D. (1978) 

Head of Developmental Studies Department 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

M.S., University of South Carolina 

B.A., Westfield State College 

Gibson, Sharyn (1983) 

Head of Radiologic Technologies 

Department 

Assistant Professor of Radiologic 

Technologies 

M.H.S., Armstrong State College 

B.S., St. Joseph's College 

A. A., Armstrong State College 

Green, Rachel (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Art 
M.F.A., University of Georgia 
B.F.A., Middle Tennessee State University 

*Gross, Jimmie (1967) 

Professor of History 

Ph.D., University of Georgia 
M.A., Auburn University 
B.D., Southern Theological 
B.A., Baylor University 

Guillou, Laurent J., Jr. (1970) 

Professor of Biology 

Ph.D., Louisiana State University 
M.S., Louisiana State University 
B.S., Louisiana State University 

^Hansen, John R. (1967) 

Professor of Mathematics 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.Ed., University of Georgia 
B.S., Troy State College 



FACULTY 



259 



Hardegree I estei I |i 1 1982) 
Director of Medical (echnolog) Program 
Assistant Professoi o\ Medical rechnolo 
\IKI ( leorgia State I rm ersit) 
B S Medi< al ^ ollege ol ( leorgia 
r> S I ni\ ersit) ol ( leorgia 

Harrii Henrj I (1966) 

I lead ol ( hemistr) and Phy su b I tepartmenl 

Professoi ol t hemisti \ 
Ph.D Georgia Institute ol r echnolog) 
B S i leorgia Institute ol I « hnolo 

rlarrii Karl D. (1971) 
^ssistanl Professor ol I nglish 

\l \ L nh «. • r -» 1 1 \ ol I ennessee 
n \ Carson Newman College 

Harris. Robert I , (1981) 
\"mk iate Professor ol Music 
I'M \ University of Washington 
\l M I m\ ersit) ol the Pa< ifk 
B M University of the Pacific 

Hart. Marcella (1986) 
Assistant Professor ol Nursing 

M \ I niversit) ol Washington 

B.S.N ,St. [ohn College 

Harwood, Pamela L. (1985) 
Associate Professor oi Education 

Ed.D., Auburn University 

M. \ . Appalachian State University 

B S Appalachian State University 

Hendricks, Christopher E. (1993) 
Assistant Professor of History/ Historic 
Presen ation 
Ph.D., The College of William and Mary 
M V. rhe College of William and Mar) 
B \ Wake Forest University 

Hizer, Todd J. (1989) 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

B.S., Old Dominion University 

Hobe, John J. (1991) 

Assistant Professor ol Education 
Ed.D., University of San Fran. 
M.A., California state University 
B.S.Ed., Bowling Green State University 

Hollinger, Karen (1990) 
Assistant Professor of English 

Ph.D., University of Illinois 

M.A.. Loyola University 

B.A., Loyola University 

Hollis, Selwyn L. (1991) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
Ph.D., North Carolina State University 
B.S., University of Georgia 

Hopkinson, Caroline (1989) 

A-sistant Professor of Library Science 
M.L.I.S., University of Wisconsin- 
Milwaukee 
B.A., Universitv of Wisconsin-Madison 



Hoppei Keith (19 l 

itanl Professoi >>t Ri 
\i \ Boise State I niversit) 

It S '<• I ni\ if sit\ 

ii, ..t.i. irnaldo (19 

'mi Professoi ol Matherj 

Ph I ) . I ni\ ersit) <'t Miami 
M S . I in\ ersit) ol Mi. urn 

B s I m\ ersit) <>t Miami 

Howard, rhomai (19 

Assistant Professor of Historical Geography 
Ph I ) . I tm ersit) ol ( alifornia 
\1 \ . I m\ ersit) ol c alifornia 
\i \ . I m\ ersit) ol t hi< age 
B \ . I m\ ersity ol t hicago 

'Hudson \"'U' L (1971) 
Professor ol Mathematics and c omputer 
Science 
Ph.D.. I ulane University 
M S., I ulane University 
B.A., Hollins College 

Hudson, Sigmund (1985) 

Professor oi Mathematics and c omputer 

S< ience 

Ph.D., Tulane University 

M.S., Clarkson University 

A.B., Dartmouth College 

Jamison, Carol P. (1993) 

Assistant Professor of English 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 
M.A., University of South .Alabama 
B.A., University of Montevallo 

Jaynes, Michael L. (1976) 

Assistant Professor of Physics 
M.S., University of North Carolina 
B.A., Appalachian State University 

Jenkins, Marvin V. (1968) 
Assistant Professor oi English 

M.A., University of Georgia 

B.S., University of Georgia 

Jensen, John G. (1985) 
Associate Professor of Art 

M.F.A., University oi Arizona 

B.S., University ol W isconsin 

♦Jensen, Linda G. (1985) 

Associate Professor oi Art 
M.F.A., Memphis State University 
M.A.T., Memphis State University 
B.A.E., University oi Mississippi 

Jodis, Stephen (1990) 

Assistant Professor oi Computer Science 
M.S., Auburn University 
B.C.P.E., Auburn University 

Jones, Dianne (1990) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
M.Ed., William Carey College 
B.S., Mississippi State University 



260 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Jones, Lynda B. (1993) 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
M.Ed., Armstrong State College 
B.Ed., Armstrong State College 

Josten, Denice (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Reading 
Ph.D., Southern Illinois University 
M.M., Southern Illinois University 
B.M., Southern Illinois University 

Kearnes, John (1988) 

Associate Professor of Political Science 

Ph.D., University of Utah 

M.A., Andrews University 

B.A., Union College 

Keith, William C, Jr. (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Music 

M.M., University of North Carolina 
B.M., East Carolina University 

Keller, Carola (1970) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 

M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N., University of Virginia 

Kempke, Suzanne (1992) 
Assistant Professor of Biology 

M.S., University of Illinois 

M.A., Northwestern University 

A.B., University of Illinois 

B.S., University of Illinois 

Khondker, R. Karim (1993) 

Associate Professor of Economics 
Ph.D., West Virginia University 
M.A., Bowling Green State University 
M.A., University of Dhaka 
B.A., University of Dhaka 

Kilhefner, Dale Z. (1973) 

Professor of Mathematics and Computer 

Science 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

M.S., Purdue University 

M.Ed., Washington State University 

B.S., Elizabethtown College 

Kingery, Dorothy (1992) 
Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Ph.D., University of Georgia 

M.Ed., Georgia College 

B.S., University of Alabama 

Knorr, Virginia W. (1973) 
Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
M.S., University of Tennessee 

(Knoxville) 
B.S., University of Tennessee 
(Chattanooga) 

Kolodny, Robert A. (1991) 

Assistant Professor of Chemistrv 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 
B.S., Queens College of New York 



Koth, Andreas W. (1991) 

Instructor of Physical Education 
M.Ed., Georgia Southern College 
B.S., Georgia Southern College 

*Lane, Joseph M., Jr. (1970) 

Professor of Psychology 

Ph.D., University of Georgia 
M.S., University of Georgia 
B.S., University of Georgia 

Lanier, Osmos, Jr. (1965) 
Professor of History 

Ph.D., University of Georgia 

M.A., Auburn University 

B.A., LaGrange College 

Lariscy, Michael L. (1976) 
Associate Professor of Physical Education 
Coordinator of Physical Education Programs 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.Ed., Georgia Southern College 
B.S., Armstrong State College 

Larson, Brett A. (1991) 

Assistant Professor of Biology 
Ph.D., University of Oregon 
B.S., University of Georgia 

Lee, Byung Moo (1981) 

Director of Library Services 
Assistant Professor of Library Science 

M.L.S., University of Wisconsin 

B.A., University of Wisconsin 

B.A., Yon Sei University 

Levett, Nettle M. (1975) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 

M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N., Florida A & M University 

Lynch, Will E. (1993) 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Ph.D., Wayne State University 
B.A., Kalamazoo College 

MacGowan, Catherine E. (1993) 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
M.S., University of Colorado 
B.S., University of Michigan-Dearborn 

Marinara, Martha (1993) 

Assistant Professor of English 
Ph.D., Lehigh University 
M.A., Southern Connecticut State 

University 
B.A., Southern Connecticut State 

University 

*Martin, Grace B. (1980) 
Head of Division of Social and Behavioral 
Sciences 

Director of General Studies Program 
Professor of Psychology 

Ph.D., Florida State University 

M.S., Florida State University 

B.A., Armstrong State College 



FACULTY 



261 



Martin Keith vn (19 

Assistant Professoi >>t I ngineering Studies 
Ph I > ( lemson I nit tt ->it\ 
\l S l niversit] ol * 

B s l m\ rtMt\ ol * 

Martin William B 1 1 
Assistant Professoi ol I nglish 

\l \ I Hike I ni\ ersit] 

B \ Armstrong State ( ollege 

Masse] ( arole M. »p>~«> 

Associate E > rofessoi oi Nursing 
KIP I m\ ersit] ol ( Georgia 
M.S.N Medical c ollege ol Georgia 
B.S.N Medical t. ollege ol Georgia 

Matthews, Robert I . (198 

Assistant Professor oi c omputer s ». ience 

\l S km a State Unh ersit] 

B \ Simpson College 

Met ormich ( ynthia (1989) 
Coordinator ol Psychology 
Assistant Professor ol Psychology 

M \ < ieorgia Southern I nh ersit] 

B \ Armstrong State College 

McMillan, Charlotte (1992) 
Instructor oi English 

\1 \ State University oi New York 

P\. Unh ersity oi C alifornia 

McMillan, Tim (1990) 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
Ph.D., University oi Florida 
\!> . University of Rorida 
B S., University of South Carolina 

McRae, Laurie (1992) 

Instructor of Radiation Therapy 
M.S., The University of North Florida 
B.S., University of Central Florida 

'Megathlin, William L. (1971) 
Dean of Academic and Enrollment Services 
Professor of Criminal justice 

Ed.D., University of Georgia 

\1 Id I m\ ersity of Georgia 

B A.. Presbyterian Colli 

Mellen, Peter J. (1993) 

Assistant Professor of Drama Speech 
Ph.D., Bowling Green State University 
MA., Bowling Green State University 
B.A., Bowling Green State University 

Mengle, Janice (1984) 
M H.S Armstrong State Colli 

B.S., Armstrong State College 

Miller, Mary (1970) 

Associate Professor of Nursing 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.S \ . Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N., Medical College of Virginia 



\i.mson, Richard i (19 

( omputei 

Ph I > I it] 

M S 

P \ 

•Mu.pln Drums D (1991) 

Professoi <>t (. i iminal |u I 
I I > l niversit] ol I lorida 
Ph l> . I niversit] ol I lorida 
Mid l niversit] ol I lorida 

B \ l ni\ i-rsit\ ol I lorida 

Mum] I rii (1993) 
Assistant Professor o( Physics 

Ph I ) . c ornell L niversit] 

M S . Cornel] Universit] 

B.S., Rose-1 1 ul man Institute oi rechnolog] 

Neuman, Bonnie (1990) 
Assistant Professor oi Nursing 

M.S.N., V\ a\ ne State L m\ ersits 

B.S.N Universit] of Michigan 

♦Newberry, S. Lloyd (1968) 
Head, Division oi Education 

Professor ol Education 

Ed.D., I ni\ ersit] of Georgia 
M I d , University of Georgia 
B.S.Ed., University of Georgia 

Noble, David (1969) 
Professor of German and latin 

Ph.D., McGill University 

\ M . Boston Unh ersity 

AH., Boston University 

Diploma Litterarium Patinarum, 
Pontificia Universitas Gregoriana 

Nordquist, Richard F. (1980) 

Director, Office of Nontraditional Learning 

Associate Professor of English 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 
MA., University oi Leicester 
B.A., State University of New York 

Norsworthy, Gary (1980) 

Dean, Coastal Georgia Center 
Ph.D., Florida State University 
MA. Florida State University 
B.A., Florida State University 

♦Palefsky, Elliot H. (1971) 
Professor oi Psychology 

Ed.D., University Of South Carolina 
\ dS., Georgia Southern College 
Ed.M., Temple University 
B.S., University of Georgia 

*Palmiotto, Michael J. (1987) 
Professor oi Criminal justice 
Ph.D., University oi Pittsburgh 
MP. A.. Citv University oi New York 
B.S., Mercy College 



262 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Paton, Jennie C. (1989) 

Instructor of Library Science 
M.L.S., University of South Carolina 
B.A., University of South Carolina 

Patterson, Robert L. (1966) 

Professor of History 

Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 
M.A., University of Kentucky 
B.A., Kentucky Wesleyan 

Popieniek, Paul H. (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Ph.D., Wesleyan University 
M.S., University of Bridgeport 
Sc.B., Brown University 

Powell, Catharine L. (1991) 

Associate Professor of Nursing 
Ed.D., Indiana University 
M.S., University of North Carolina 
B.S.N., DePauw University 

Pruden, Rhel B. (1985) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 

M.N., University of South Carolina 
B.S.N., SUNY- Buffalo 

*Pruden, George B., Jr., (1982) 

Associate Professor of History 
Ph.D., American University 
M.A., American University 
M.Ed., University of South Carolina 
B.A., Wake Forest 

^Raymond, Richard (1983) 

Professor of English 

Ph.D., Miami University 
M.A., University of Wyoming 
B.A., University of Wyoming 

Relyea, Kenneth (1990) 
Head of Biology Department 
Professor of Biology 

Ph.D., Tulane University 
M.S., Florida State University 
B.A., Florida State University 

Reilly, Nancy E. (1990) 

Associate Professor of Nursing 
Ph.D., University of Michigan 
M.S., University of Michigan 
B.S.N., Georgetown University 

Remler, Nancy (1992) 

Instructor of English 

M.A., Georgia Southern University 
B.S.Ed., University of Georgia 

*Repella, James F. (1976) 
Dean of Health Professions 

Professor of Nursing 

Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 
M.S.N., University of Pennsylvania 
B.S.Ed., Temple University 



*Rhee, Steve Y. (1974) 

Professor of Political Science 
Ph.D., University of Missouri 
M.A., University of Oregon 
B.A., University of Oregon 

Richardson, Edwin G. (1989) 

Assistant Professor of English 
M.A., University of Maine 
B.A., University of South Florida 

Roberts, Lynn T. (1989) 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

M.S., Armstrong State College 

B.S., Armstrong State College 

Rodgers, Anne T. (1985) 

Associate Professor of Medical Technology 
Ph.D., University of Florida 
M.A.T., University of Massachusetts 
B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University 

*Roesel, Rosalyn L. (1984) 

Professor of Nursing 

Ph.D., North Texas State University 
M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
B.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 

*Roth, Lorie (1983) 

Assistant to the Vice President 
Associate Professor of English 

Ph.D., Kent State University 

M.A., Kent State University 

B.A., Kent State University 

Saadatmand, Yassaman (1989) 

Assistant Professor of Economics 
Ph.D., University of New Hampshire 
M.B.A., James Madison University 
B.S., National Iranian Oil Company 
College of Finance 

Sajwan, Maria (1992) 

Interlibrary Loan/ Bibliographic Instruction 

Librarian 

M.L.S., University of Kentucky 
B.A., Colorado State University 

Schmidt, John C. (1979) 

Associate Professor of Art 
M.F.A., Ohio University 
B.F.A., Carnegie-Mellon University 

Schollaert, Warren L. (1989) 

Associate Professor of Education 
Ed.D., University of Georgia 
M.A., Roosevelt University 
B.A., Arizona State University 

*Schultz, Lucinda D. (1986) 
Associate Professor of Music 

D.M.A., University of Coloradoo 
M.M., Colorado State University 
B.S., Dickinson State College 

Scott, Daniel B., Major (1991) 

Head of Military Science Department 
Assistant Professor of Military Science 
M.A., Central Michigan University 
B.S., South Carolina State College 



FACULTY 



263 



Shiple) ( harlei (19 

Professoi ol Mathematics and ( omputei 

s v i, mu e 

I'd 1 > I niversit) »>t Nebi 

\l S Georgia Institute ol rechnolog) 

\i \ I m\ »iNit\ oi Nebraska 

B \ l 1 1 1 \ ersit) oi North l lakota 

Sllcoa i laine (1972) 
Assistant Professoi ol \ 1 1 1 -. 1 1 1 > ; 

M ^ \ Medical ( ollege ol ( leorgia 

\i Ed I m\ ersit) ol I torida 

B.S.N l m\ ersit) o\ I lorida 

'Simon I min.i 1 . I l l '~ |) 

A< ting Associate <> Iraduate I tean 

Professoi ol I lealth Science 
Bd.D l ni\ ersit) ol South ( arolina 
Mill Medical College oi Georgia 
B S Vrmstrong State c ollege 

Sissofi Michelle w. (1990) 
Assistant Professor ol I ducation 
M Ed. Armstrong State Colli 
B S I d.j Unh ersity i>t t leorgia 

Smith, Carolyn G. (1977) 
Assistant Professor ol Mathematics 
Ml d ., Armstrong State College 
B S Vrmstrong State College 

sm,th, [amefl (1990) 
Assistant Professor ol I nglish 

Ph. I)., Vanderbilt University 

MA . \ anderbilt Unh ersit) 

IV A . Berr) College 

Smith, Pamela E. (1987) 
Assistant Professor ol Biology 

Ml d . Armstrong State College 

B.S., Armstrong State College 

Smith, William J., Jr. (1982) 

Assistant Professor of Respiratory Therapy 
M.H.s . Armstrong State College 
B.S., Medical Universit) ol South 
e arolina 

Stegall, John L. (1981) 
Vice President tor Business mu] Finance 
M.B.A, Universit) of Georgia 

B.S., Indiana State I ni\ ersit) 

*Stern, Camille P. (1991) 
Associate Professor of Nursing 
Ph.D., University of Texas 
M.S.N., University ol Alabama 
B.S., Medical College of Georgia 

*Stokes, William W. (1967) 
Assistant Dean of Education 
Professor of Education 
Ed.D., University of Florida 
M.I d.. I niversity of Rorida 
B.A., University of Florida 



si, ,,.,- p.... i D (19 >) 

Pii I > I nu. i \ l ni> i 

M \ Purdue i niversit) 

\ B Randolph Macon Women t( ollegi 

Stratum ( edrii 1 19( 
Professoi ol ( hemiatn 
Ph I ) . I niversit) *>t I ondon 

Strainer, I dward B. (1991) 

t.int Professoi «>t I du< ation 
I d I ) . state l niversit) ol Ne%* ^ 

M.S., ( .UllsHls ( oil. 

B s State I niversit) i>i \rw M>rk 

'Stealer, lames, fr. (1988) 
Asso< iate Professor ol I lealth & i( i 
I d I ).. I m\ ersity oi south c arolina 
M id. I m\ ersit) ol south c arolina 
B.A., I m\ ersity ol South c arolina 

Stro/ier, Robert I. (1965) 

I )in\ tor ol Public Relations 
Ph 1 ) . I lorida State I niversit) 
M \. I lorida State I niversity 
A. IV. I m\ ersit) ol Georgia 

Taggart, Helen M. (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
M.s \ c leorgia Southern L niversity 
B S V Armstrong State C ollege 

Talley, Brenda S. (1992) 

Assistanl Professor ol Nursing 
M.S.N., Georgia Southern University 
B.S.X., Armstrong State College 

h Tanenbaum, Barbara G. (1972) 
I lead of Dental Hygiene Department 
Associate Professor oi Dental Hygiene 
Ed.D., Universit) ol Georgia 
M.Ed., Armstrong State College 
B.S., Medical College of Georgia 

Tapp, Lawrence M. (1959) 

Professor ot Physical Education 
Ed.D., University of rennessee 
M.S., Universit) o\ rennessee 
B.S., I m\ ersit) ol rennessee 

Taylor, Stephen A. (1992) 
Assistant Professor of Psycholog) 
Ph.D., University ol Rorida 

B.A., Oswega State College 

Tessema, George (1993) 

Assistant Professor ol Mathematics 
Ph.D., State l.'ni\ ersity of New ^ ork at 

Alban) 
M S., Florida State University 
B.S., 1 laile Sellassie I University 

Thorne, Francis M. (1965) 
Professor o\ Biology 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 

B.S., Stetson University 



264 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Tilley, Roger (1991) 

Assistant Professor of Biology 
Ph.D., Baylor College of Medicine 
M.S., East Tennessee State University 
B.S., East Tennessee State University 

h Tilson, Elwln R. (1982) 

Associate Professor of Radiologic 

Technologies 

Ed.D., University of Georgia 

M.S., San Francisco State University 

B.S., Arizona State University 

Vogelsang, Kevin (1988) 
Associate Professor of Music 

D.M.A., University of Cincinnati 

M.M., University of Cincinnati 

B.M., University of Cincinnati 

Walker, Deborah J. (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Anthropology 
Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 
M.A., Pennsylvania State University 
B.S., University of Michigan 

Walworth, Margaret E. (1991) 

Assistant Professor of Education 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 
M.Ed., Clemson University 
B.S., Clemson University 

h Warlick, Roger K. (1970) 

Assistant Dean of Arts & Sciences 
Professor of History 

Ph.D., Boston University 

B.A., Arizona State University 

Weingarten, Barry E. (1991) 

Assistant Professor of Spanish 
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
M.A., University of Pennsvlvania 
B.A., George Washington University 

Welsh, John A., Ill (1967) 

Assistant Professor of English 
M.A., Vanderbilt University 
B.A., Davidson College 

^Wheeler, Ed R. (1987) 

Head of Mathematics and Computer Science 
Department 

Professor of Mathematics and Computer 
Science 

Ph.D., University of Virginia 

B.A., Samford University 

White, Laurie (1989) 

Assistant Professor of Computer Science 
Ph.D., University of Florida 
M.S., University of Florida 
B.A., University of Virginia 

White, Susan S. (1972) 
Assistant Professor of Education 

M.Ed., University of South Carolina 

B.S., Winthrop College 



*Whiten, Morris L. (1970) 
Professor of Physics 

Ph.D., University of Georgia 
B.S., University of Georia 

Williamson, Jane B. (1976) 
Assistant Professor of Nursing 

M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia 
M.Ed., Georgia Southern College 
B.S.N., University of Georgia 

Wright, Janet (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
M.S., Syracuse University 
B.S.N. , Syracuse University 

Wynn, Gail G. (1992) 

Assistant Professor of Biology 
Ph.D., Louisiana State University 
M.S., Louisiana State University 
B.S., Oglethorpe University 

*Yentsch, Anne (1992) 
Associate Professor of Historical 
Archaeology 

Ph.D., Brown University 

M.A., Brown University 

M.A., University of Miami (Florida) 

Zipperer, William C. (1991) 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Ph.D., University of Georgia 
B.S., University of Georgia 



Emeriti Faculty 

Anchors, Lorraine (1954-1983) 

Professor of English Emerita 

Anderson, Donald D. (1966-1992) 

Dean of Community Services & Registrar 
Emeritus 

Ashmore, Henry L. (1965-1982) 
President Emeritus 

Beecher, Orson (1942-1982) 

Professor of History Emeritus 

Bell, Dorothy G. (1969-1991) 

Assistant Professor of Nursing Emerita 

Boney, Madeline (1967-1982) 

Professor of History Emerita 

Brooks, Sammy Kent (1966-1990) 

Professor of English Emeritus 

Brown, Hugh R. (1968) 

Professor of English Emeritus 

Coyle, William (1957-1987) 
Professor of Political Science Emeritus 

Davenport, Leslie B., Jr. (1958-1983) 

Professor of Biologv Emeritus 



THE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM 



265 



I >.l\ is I .1111. 1! \\ 

Professoi oi Business Administration 

I mei itus 

Gadsden Ids 119M 1981) 
Professoi oi I du< ation I mei it.i 

rlannoad rhelnu (1963 1981) 
Professor oi I du< ation I merits 

Killorin [oseph i (1947-1988) 
Professor oi Philosoph) >.v I iterature 
\ meritus 

i iwson, c oroelia (1972-1987) 
Professoi oi Education 1 merita 

Magnus, Robert I (1973-1991) 
Professor of Criminal fustice Emeritus 

\kc arthy, fohn c . (1982-1990) 
Professor oi Political Science Emeritus 

Met lanahan, Billie F. (1981-1989) 

in! Professor of English Emerita 

Newman. |ohn (H68-1987) 

»sor ot Politica] Science Emeritus 



Pendexter, Hugh III 

l|sh I HUT itlls 

Pinael Ulen i (1* 

t Biology I meritus 

Robbins, Paul (1 

Professor ot ( rtemistr) I meritus 

Robinson, tarella (1 

\ssoi i.i ti- Professor ot I ducation I n 

Sartor, Herman (1964-1981) 

Professor ot I ducation I meritus 

s.ms, R03 [esse (1955-1990) 

Professor oi Physical I ducation I meritus 

Stephens, |acqueline (1979-1990) 

Professor oi I ducation I merita 

Stratton, c edri< (1965-1993) 
Professor oi c hemistr) I meritus 

Winn, William (1957-1971) 
Professor oi Mathematics Emeritus 



Officers of Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia 

Ha rrv Downs Acting Chancellor 

Arthur Dunning Acting Executive Vice Chancellor 

Henry G. Neal Executive Secretary 

lames F Coter Vice Chancellor Fiscal Affairs Ireasurer 

Thomas F. Daniel Vice Chancellor External Affairs 

Vacant Vice Chancellor S-rv ices And Minority Affairs 

Peter S. Hoff Vice Chancellor Academic Affairs 

lames B. Mathews Vice Chancellor Information Technology 

Barrv Fullerton Vice Chancellor Student Ser\ ices 

Haskin R. Pounds Vice Chancellor Research and Planning 

Douglas H. RewertS Vice Chancel lor Facilities 

Cathie Mayes Hudson Assistant Vice Chancel lor Planning 

T. Don Davis Asst. Vice Chancellor Fiscal Affairs Personnel 

Mary Ann Hickman Asst. Vice Chancellor Affirmative Action 

F. C.illis Mac Kinnon, III Asst. Vice Chancellor Facilities 

Thomas F. Mann Asst. Vice Chancellor Facilities 

David M. Morgan Asst. Vice Chancellor Academic Affairs 

C. Roger Mosshart Asst. Vice Chancellor Fiscal Affairs Budgets 

Ernest C. Murphrey ...Asst. Vice Chancellor Fiscal Affairs/Accounting Systems and Procedures 

1. Pete Silver Asst. Vice Chancellor Academic Affairs 

Joseph J. Szutz Asst Vice Chancellor Planning 

Kay Miller Assistant to the Chancellor/ Director of System Adv ancement 

Elizabeth E. N'eely Assistant Executive Secretary 

John Sherwood Assistant Executive Secretary 



Univ ersitv System of Georgia 
244 Washington St., S \\ . 

Atlanta, Georgia 30334 



266 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



Officers of Administration 

Robert A. Burnett President 

Frank A. Butler Vice President and Dean of Faculty 

John L. Stegall Vice President for Business and Finance 

Joseph A. Buck Vice President for Student Affairs 

John A. Gehrm II Executive Director, Office of College Advancement 

William L. Megathlin Dean, Academic and Enrollment Services 

Joseph V. Adams Dean, School of Arts and Sciences 

Lloyd Newberry Dean, School of Education 

James F. Repella Dean, School of Health Professions 

Lorie Roth Assistant to the Vice President 

William P. Kelso Assistant to Vice President for Student Affairs 

William W. Stokes Assistant Dean, School of Education 

Roger K. Warlick Assistant Dean, School of Arts and Sciences 

Sara Connor Assistant to the Dean, School of Health Professions 

Gary F. Norsworthy Dean, Coastal Georgia Center for Continuing Education 

Kim West Registrar and Director of Admissions 

Carol Andrews Director, Advisement Center 

Lynn Benson Director, Counseling Services 

Roger Counsil Director, Athletics 

Lorie Durant Director, Career Planning and Placement 

Mark Eversoll Acting Director, Computer and Information Services 

Daniel Harrell Director, Finance 

Al Harris Director, Student Activities 

Byung Moo Lee Director, Library Services 

Richard Nordquist Director, Office of Nontraditional Learning 

Robert I. Strozier Director, Public Relations 

Vacant Director, Alumni Affairs 

Alfred Owens Director, Minority Affairs and Minority Recruitment 

Vacant Director, Plant Operations 

Ellen Shawe Director, Student Financial Aid 

Ellen Struck Director, Personnel 

Joann Windeler Director, Business Services 



Institutions of the University System of Georgia 
Universities 



Athens 30602 Augusta 30912 

University of Georgia — h; B,J,M,S,D Medical College of Georgia — h; A,B,M,D 

Atlanta 30332 Statesboro 30460 

Georgia Institute of Technologv — h; B,M,D Georgia Southern University — h; 

Atlanta 30303 A,B,M,S,cD 

Georgia State University— A,BJ,M,S,D Valdosta 31698 

Valdosta State University— h; A,B,M,S,cD 



THE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM 



267 



Senior Colleges 



Alktm m 

\lkun State ( ollege h B M 

AmetUUs | 

Southwestern College h \ h \1 s 
Augusta J0910 

just* t ollegc \ B \i s 
«. arrollton K)l 18 

West Georgia <. ollege h \ B M S 
Columbus 

Columbus ^ ollege \ H \i s 
Dahloneg 

North Georgia College K; V,B,M 
Foci Valley H030 

fort \ alle) State College h. \ ,B Al 






Marietta 10061 

Kennesav* Coll< 
Man. • 

Southern 1 *•». Kni< al Inatituta 
Milledgeville U061 

ollege I 
Mom 

( layton State ( ollege \ B 
Savannah U419 

\i mstrong State C olleg< \1 

Savannah 11404 

Savannah State i ollege h; A B \1 



Two- Year Colleges 



Alham 51707 

I tarton State College 
Atlanta 30310 

Atlanta Metropolitan College — A 
Bainbridge 31717 

Bainbridge College \ 
BarnesviUe 30204 

Gordon College — h; A 
Brunswick 31523 

Brunswick C ollege — A 
Cochran 31014 

Middle Georgia College — h; A 
Dalton 30720 

Dalton College — A 
Decatur 30034 

Dekalb College— A 



Douglas v 

south Georgia College — h; A 
Gainesville 30503 

( iainesville College — A 
Macon 31297 

Macon C ollege — A 
Rome 30163 

Floyd College— A 
Swainsboro 30401 

f as< Georgia College — A 
htton 317 

Abraham Baldwin Agri. College — h; A 
Waycross 31501 

Waycross College — A 



On-Campus Student Housing Facilities Degrees Awarded: A - Associate: B - Baccalaureate; 
j - Juris Doctor; \1 - Masters, S specialist in Education; D - Doctorate 
cD- Doctorate offered in cooperation with a University System university, 
with degree awarded by the university 



Board of Regents 

Allgood, Thomas F., Sr Tenth 

Anderson, John H., Jr State at I arge 

Baranco, Juanita Powell Eleventh 

Brown, James E \inth 

Clark, John Howard Eighth 

Clark, S.William, Jr. M.D hirst 

Cousins, VV. Lamar, M.D Sixth 

Cowan, Joel H State at Large 

Elson, Suzanne G State at Large 

Evans, Dwight H Fourth 

Hand, Elsie P Second 

Leebern, Donald M., Jr State at Large 

McMillan, Elridge W Firth 

Phillips, Barry, Chairman State at Large 

Rhodes, Edgar L Seventh 

Turner, William B Third 



268 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



GLOSSARY OF TERMS 

academic advisement: students meet with an advisor each quarter before registering for 
courses (departmental advising for students who have declared a major, Advisement 
Center for students who have not, Developmental Studies for students required to take 
Developmental Studies courses) to discuss the classes planned for the next quarter. 
Advising ensures students are fulfilling requirements for their degree. 

academic probation: a status that indicates students are not maintaining the required 
minimum GPA. The first time a student falls below the required GPA he or she is placed 
on Good Standing with Warning. Failure to raise the adjusted GPA to the required level 
during the next quarter will result in Academic Probation. Students on Academic 
Probation are not in Good Standing. 

academic suspension: status given to students on academic Probation who neither 
achieve the required adjusted GPA nor earn at least a 2.0 grade point average during the 
probationary period. Such students will need to appeal to continue attending college. 

accredited: a designation that an institution has been evaluated and met criteria set by an 
independent oversight agency. The Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association 
of Colleges and Schools rules on accreditation for Armstrong State College. 

ACT- American College Testing: a standardized exam that tests verbal and math skills. 

add (a class): students may sign up for another class after their initial registration. 

adjusted GPA: the total honor points earned divided by the total hours attempted, with 
hours and honors points for repeated courses not duplicated in the calculation (see GPA) 
Includes transfer hours credited to the student's course of study at Armstrong. 

advance registration: an early registration period, usually about six weeks prior to the 
start of the quarter, available to currently enrolled students. Also known as pre- 
registration. 

area of concentration: a part of the course of study required for the Bachelor of General 
Studies degree; any minor approved by the Board of Regents can be chosen. 

Associate of Arts Degree (AA): a program of study lasting two years (full-time that 
completes a student's core curriculum requirements. 

Associate Degree (AD): a program of study lasting two years (full-time) in a specific 
discipline also known as a career degree, the program of study is designed to prepare 
students for immediate employment (see Associate of Applied Science and Associate of 
Science Degrees. 

Associate of Applied Science Degree (AAS): a program of study lasting two years (full- 
time) in a specific discipline (see Associate Degree). 

Associate of Science Degree (AS): a program of study lasting two years (full-time in a 
specific discipline (see Associate Degree). 

auditing: attending a class without receiving credit. Students must be enrolled, receive 
permission from the instructor, declare audit status at the time of registration, and pay 
the tuition and fees for the class. 

baccalaureate: a program of study lasting four years (full-time) consisting of two years 
of core curriculum and two years of courses in an area of specialization or major (see 
Bachelor of Arts/Science Degrees). 

Bachelor of Arts Degree (BA)/Bachelor of Science Degree (BS): a program of study 
lasting four years (full-time) consisting of two years of core curriculum and two years of 
courses in an area of specialization or major also referred to as a "Bachelor's Degree" or 
baccalaureate degree. 

Board of Regents: the governing board of the University System of Georgia. 



GLOSSARY 269 



certification p r o gr ams; a course of stud) shortei than a degree, lead ii ializarion 

m ,i held c ertification programs al tin- c ollege ini lude teachei certification and radio 
logi< al U\ Kni< ian < ertitu ation 

c li \( )s (( ommunication, Help, Advisement, Orientation and Service): an orientation 
jram held during the summer foi ne^ students ( HAOS leaders are students who 
ha> e been brained to run these orientation sessions. 

challenge exams: available onlj for specific courses! usually t *. >r students who have 
experien( e in a certain held. Students passing this typeol exam would be exempt from 
( ertain basi< 1 lasses. 

CI l P College 1 evel 1 xamination Program: a standardized test used to determine 
proficienc) in a specific area of study.. If students s< ore .it .1 certain level on a c I 1 P test. 
the) w ill receh e ( redil for .1 class in that subjex t area in some areas, students w ill be 
required to pass a higher level course with .1 minium grade before CLEP< redil is given. 

CPC— College Preparatory Curriculum: a high school course of Stud) required oi all 
students graduating From high school in the spring ot 1988 or latei . ( ourse requirements 
include English, math, science, social sciences ^nd foreign languages. CPC requirements 
appl) to students w ith a Gl D who w Ould have graduated in 1988 or later. 

CPE — College Placement Exam: establishes students' proficiency levels in reading, 

English ^nd math. Based on the scores received, Students may be placed in Developmen- 
tal Studies courses. I his exam is given to students before their first quarter. 
conditional admission: admission status of students who dt.) not qualif) tor regular 
admission because of low SAT or AC I scores and/or grade point a\ erage (C IPA). 
core curriculum: a broad-based course of studs required oi all students pursuing a 
Bachelor's degree. Courses come from the areas of the humanities, social sciences, and 
math and natural sciences for a total of 90 quarter hours 

delayed admission: admission status of students who have not attended high school or 
college within the last five years and have earned fewer than 20 transferable credits. I hese 

applicants are not required to take the SAT or ACT, but will take the College Placement 
exam (CPE). 

Doctorate of Philosophy: a program of study lasting three or more years (full-time in a 

specific area oi specialization. This degree is attempted after a Master's degree and 
usually requires a dissertation for completion oi the degree. 

drop (a class): students may decide not to take a class they signed up for. 

early admission: a program for high school students who have not completed the 
eleventh grade and who have demonstrated outstanding academic potential. High 
school students are allowed to take a maximum oi two college courses each quarter. 

exit exams: exams given by a department to graduating seniors to determine minimum 

levels oi competency in the major subject area. 

freshman: student who has earned fewer than 4^ quarter hours. 

full-time: students taking 1? or more quarter hours of classes. 

GED — General Education Development: an equivalent to the high school diploma; 
students must produce C.I I ) scores for admission. 

good standing: a status that indicates students are maintaining the required minimum 
GPA. 

good standing with warning: status given to students whose GPA falls below the 

required GPA for the first tie. 

GPA (Grade Point Average): a point system used to determine the average of all grades 
a student has received for one quarter or for an entire college career. To determine GPA, 
honor points are awarded based on each grade received, which are totaled then divided 
by the number of hours attempted. 



270 ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



graduate work: refers to any studies done toward a master's degree or PhD. 

GRE — Graduate Record Exam: a standardized exam that tests verbal and math skills, 
usually used as part of the admissions process for graduate school. 

honor points: the points earned based on the letter grade and quarter hours credited for 
a course. Used to determine GPA. 

independent study: classes that permit students to pursue individual research and 
reading in their major field. Permission from the department head or the professor is 
required. 

in-state tuition: rate of tuition paid by Georgia residents. Non-residents, in special cases, 
may receive an out-of-state tuition waiver which would allow them to pay the in-state 
tuition rate. 

intramurals: organized competitive sports activities coordinated though the Depart- 
ment of Athletics. Open to all interested students. 

joint enrollment: a program for high school students who have completed the tenth 
grade and have demonstrated outstanding academic potential. This program allows 
students to enroll full-time at the College while remaining on the rolls of a local high 
school. At the end of their freshman year students receive their high school diploma. 

junior: student who has earned between 90 and 134 quarter hours. 

major: an area of concentrated study in a degree program approved by the Board of 
Regents. For a major program, a department will require from 15 to 30 quarter hours of 
specific courses or approved elective courses in related fields and may require language 
courses reaching the degree of proficiency specified by the department. Total require- 
ments in the major and related fields may not exceed 85 quarter hours. 

Master's degree (MA, MS, MEd): a program of study lasting two years (full-time) in a 
specific area of specialization. This degree is attempted after a Bachelor's degree and may 
require an in-depth research paper or thesis for completion of the degree. 

minor: an optional course of study chosen in addition to a major consisting of 20 specified 
quarter hours in an area of study different from the students' major. Minors are approved 
by the Board of Regents. 

out-of-state tuition: rate of tuition paid by students who are not legal residents of 
Georgia. 

part-time: students taking fewer than 12 quarter hours of classes. 

pre-professional programs: courses appropriate for the first two years of baccalaureate 
programs not offered among degree programs here at the College, such as business, 
engineering, forestry, pharmacy and physical therapy Also includes study appropriate 
for dentistry, law, medicine, veterinary medicine and other professional fields. 

pre-registration: an early registration period available to currently enrolled students. 
Also known as advance registration. 

prerequisite: a course required before a more advanced course may be taken. Prerequi- 
sites are listed in the catalog under course descriptions. 

programs of study: refers to specific majors or areas of study, usually leading to a degree, 
that are offered by the College. 

provisional admission: admission status of students who have not completed the college 
prep curriculum (CPC) upon entering the College. College level courses to fill these 
deficiencies must be taken immediately (See CPC). 

quarter hours: the approximate number of hours spent each week in a particular class. 
Also used to determine the total number of hours students register for. 



GLOSSARY 271 



quartet system: a •> Kool term based on approximate!) ten wwks, with foui 

readmissioru students who h.i\ i- attended Armstrong in the p.ist. but have nol I 
( lasses al the( ollege foi oneoi more quarters nol including summei quartei 

Regents exam: an exam measuring minimum writing and reading skills ^\cm to .ill 

students in the university System ol Georgia schools seeking a Bacheloi rhis 

exam is required aftei a student has completed 5 quartei hours. 

registration: a time to enroll foi Bpe< ifi< classes foi the next quartei Regui ition 

is held ea< h quartei tin- da) before ^ lasses begin 

regulai admission: admission status for students who, upon entrance to the c ol 

have tin- required standardized test scores (SA1 Verbal MJO SA1 Mat! \( l 

English 20 AC I Math 18), required grade point average (2.0)/ have completed the 

required college prep ». urrk ulum (see c re i. and Inn e not been out ol high s C hool more 

than tour ^ ears, ["his status will be awarded to other students upon completing 30 hours 

ot college ^ redit with a 2.0 grade point a\ erage. 

residency: students are considered residents ot c ieorgia it they h.n e In ed in ( leorgia al 
least one j ear and consider c leorgia their home. Students who have not h\ ed in c ieorgia 
for one year or who are just coming toe ieorgia for their education and plan to mo\ e ba< k 

to another state after graduation are not considered residents. 

ROTC — Reserve Officer Training Corps: a curriculum a\ ailable to students at Arm- 
Strong and Savannah State that qualifies students ten- a commission as an officer in the I s 
Armv. Army Resen es, I s \a\ j , Naval Reservesor IS National Guard after graduation 
SAT — Scholastic Aptitude Test: a Standardized exam that tests verbal ^nd math skills. 
Scores are used to determine admission status for freshmen. 

semester system: a school term based on approximately 1 5 weeks, including two regular 
sessions each year plus a short summer session. 

senior: student who has earned 135 or more quarter hours. 

short course: a continuing education course that does not award college credit though it 
may award continuing education units. 

sophomore: student who has earned between 45 ,md 89 quarter hours. 
transcript: an official record of all courses a student has taken at a particular institution. 
An official transcript is a transcript sent directly from one institution to another; a student 
copy is a transcript issued to students. 

transfer: students seeking admission who have previously been enrolled at another 
institution o\ higher education. 

transfer credit: credit for courses taken at another institution, (..ranting credit w ill be 
considered only tor course work from ,-\n accredited institution. 

transient: admission status of students currently enrolled at another institution applying 

for temporary admission to Armstrong for one quarter. Students must be in \2,ood 
standing at their home college, have written permission from their dean or registrar to 
take specific courses at Armstrong which will be transferred to their home institution. 

University System of Georgia: the overall system of public higher education in Georgia, 

comprised oi 5 universities, 14 senior colleges and 15 junior colleges. 

withdrawal: the act of dropping a class, the date o\ the withdrawal determining any 
grade penalty; or the act of dropping out of school completely. 



272 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 



INDEX 



Academic Progress 52 

Academic Standing 58 

Accelerated Admission Program 32 

Accreditations 11 

Administrative Officers 266 

Admissions 25 

Conditional 28 

Delayed 33 

Early 33 

GED 33 

General Information 26 

Graduate 78 

International Students 34 

Joint Enrollment 35 

Over 62 34 

Policies 26 

Provisional 27 

Readmission 32 

Regular 26 

Special Categories 33 

Transfer Students 30 

Transient Students 32 

Veterans 34 

Vocational Rehabilitation 34 

Admission Requirements to Specific 

Programs 35 

Art & Music 35 

Dental Hygiene 38 

Dental Hygiene Education 39 

Health Science 41 

Medical Technology 41 

Nursing (Associate) 36 

Nursing (Baccalaureate) 37 

Radiologic Technologies 40 

Respiratory Therapy 39 

Teacher Education 179 

Adults Back to College Program 23 

Advancement 12 

Alumni Affairs 12 

Development 12 

ASC Foundation 12 

Public Relations 12 

Advisement 56 

Advisement Center 23 

Alcohol & Drug Education 22 

Alumni Association 12 

Application Fee 45 

Art & Music Department 85 

Arts and Sciences, School of 82 

ASC 101 245 

Associate Degree 

General Requirements 70 

Athletics 19 

Attendance 58 

Auditing 60 

Baccalaureate Degree 

General Requirements 70 

Biology Department 98 



Bookstore 24 

Brunswick Center 15 

Calendar (Academic) inside front cover 

Career Planning & Placement 22 

Chemistry, Physics & Engineering 

Department 105 

Classification of Students 56 

Clubs/Organizations, Students 18 

Coastal Georgia Center for 

Continuing Education 16 

College Preparatory Curriculum 27 

Collegiate Placement Examination 28 

Computer Center 23 

Continuing Education 16 

Cooperative Education Programs 14 

Core Curriculum Requirements 65 

Corporate Program 15 

Counseling Center 21 

Course Offerings 

Accounting (SSC) 194 

Anthropology 169 

Art 90 

Astronomy 113 

Biology 101 

Botany 103 

Business Administration (SSC) 195 

Chemistry 108 

Computer Science 165 

Criminal Justice 120 

Dental Hygiene 220 

Developmental Studies 245 

Drama/Speech 147 

Economics 171 

Education 

Business 194 

EDN 188 

Exceptional Children 191 

Library Media/Science 193 

Engineering Ill 

English 149 

Film 152 

French 153 

Geography 131 

Geology 113 

German .154 

Health Education 227 

Health Science 225 

History 132 

Journalism 157 

Latin 155 

Library Media 193 

Library Science 194 

Linguistics 158 

Mathematics 162 

Medical Technology 229 

Meteorology 113 

Military Science 249 

Music 93 



INDEX 



273 



Naval ROT( 
Nursing 

.1 K 

I 
•.ipln I 1 1 

Office Administration (SS< I 

Philosophy 

Physical Education 199 

Physical ^ ience 1 12 

Physics 113 

Political n. ience 

PS) v Kolog) 

Public Administration 

Public Histor) 

Radiation 1 herap) 

Radiologic I echnologies 

Respirator) rherapj 

olog) 176 

Spanish 155 

Zoology 103 

Courses 

Auditing 60 

Course 1 oad 

Dropping 

I ettering System tor 71 

Numbering S\ stem tor 70 

0\ or load 5b 

Repeating 

Withdrawing from College 60 

Credit bv Examination 2^ 

Criminal Justice Training Center 17 

j Enrollment (AS< -SS< 17 

Dean's List 58 

ee Programs Offered 

e Programs (Categories) 

operative 14 

Dual -Degree 14 

Four-Year 13 

Pre- Professional 13 

School of Arts and Sciences SI 

School of Education 177 

School of Health Professions 207 

Two-Year 13 

Degree Requirements r>4 

Dental Hygiene Department 21S 

Development 13 

Developmental Studies Department 245 

Disabilities, Students with 22 

Dismissal (Academic) 59 

Distance Learning 1^ 

Division of Curriculum and Instruction 181 

Division of Physical Education 

and Athletics Wh 

Drop/ Add 59 

Dual Degree Programs 14 

Education, School of 177 

Elderhostel 22 

Engineering Transfer Program 14 

English Placement 69 

Evening Courses 14 



I Inarv lal Aid 
\ppiu stion Pi 
l mplo) menl 
i .i>\ ernmenl Benefits 
i irants 

I ('.Ills 

& holarships 

I r.msti-r Students 

Veterans Benefits 
l ood st\ u e 

l reshman I Kperience (AS< 101 » 
t leneral Studies 

C.loss.UA 

c Government Hem-tits 

c .o\ ernmenl I tepartment 11^ 

Grade Appeals 

Grade Reports 

Graduate Studies, c ollege i>t 

Admission 

Application Procedure 

tasistantships 

Off-Campus (. enters 

Programs 

Purposo 

Graduation, State Requirements 

Health Professions, School of 

Health Science Department 

History Department 

Hisfor\ C.overnment State Requirement- 

History of the College 11 

Honor Code 60 

Honor Societies 21 

Honors 

Housing 

Intercollegiate Athletic Program 

International Students 

lntramurals 21 

Inventories oi Interest 21 

lane Library 21 

Languages, Literature, and Dramatic 

Arts Department 142 

Lettering System for Courses 71 

Librarv Media Program 

Librarv Services 2 

Location of the College 1 1 

Mathematics and Computer Science 

Department 159 

Mathematics Placement 

Math Tutorial Center 

Medical Technology Program 22" 

Military Experience. Credit for 

Military Science Program 24h 

Minority Advisement Program 

Minors 

Arts & Sciences 

Education 181 

Naval Science Program 251 



274 



ARMSTRONG STATE COLLEGE 






Nontraditional Learning, Office of 23 

Numbering System for Courses 70 

Nursing Department (Associate) 209 

Nursing Department (Baccalaureate) 212 

Off-Campus Courses 14 

Orientation 20 

Overloads 56 

Parking Regulations 24 

Physical Education Division 196 

Physical Education Requirements 69 

Pre-Professional Programs 13 

Probation (Academic) 59 

Provisional Admission 27 

Public Relations 12 

Public Service Center 16 

Purpose of the College 10 

Radiation Therapy Technology 235 

Radiologic Technologies Department 231 

Reading Lab 23 

Readmission 32 

Refunds 47 

Regents' Engineering Transfer 

Program 14,30 

Regents' Testing Program 68 

Regional Criminal Justice 

Training Center 17 

Registration 

Late Fee 46 

Repeating Courses 59 

Residence Life 20 

Residency Reclassification 45 

Residency Requirements 44 



Respiratory Therapy Department 237 

Satisfactory Academic Progress 52 

Scholarships 50 

Short Courses 46 

Social and Behavioral Sciences 168 

Statement of Purpose 10 

Student 

Government Association 20 

Housing 45 

Organizations 20 

Publications 21 

Student Teaching 180 

Suspension (Academic) 59 

Testing 

Collegiate Placement Examination 28 

Credit by Examination 29 

English and Mathematics 

Placement Tests 69 

Regents' Testing Program 68 

Transfer Students 

Financial Aid 49 

Requirements of Applicants 30 

Transient Students 32 

Tuition 44 

Veterans 

Admissions 34 

Financial Aid 52 

Vocational Rehabilitation 34 

Weekend Classes 14 

Withdrawals (Involuntary) 60 

Withdrawing from College 60 

Writing Center 23 



Where to Write or Call 



College 

in 
•997 (out th.im County) Ciilll -800-633-2349 






»N 



NT 

465 

ALUMNI 

rs, Office of Co 
. icement 
;64 

'ICS 
tor of Athletics 
S336 

BUSINESS MATTERS 
Vice President for Business & Finance 
:55 

CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT 
of Career Planning 
and Placement 
:69 

CATALOG 

of Admissions 

CONTINUING EDUCATION 
Georgia Center for 
Continuing Education 
322 

COUNSELING 
director of Counseling 
327-5269 

FINANCIAL AID. GRANTS. LOANS 

WORK-STUDY ELIGIBILITY 
Director of Student Financial Aid 
927-5272 

EVENING. WEEKEND. & OFF- 
CAMPUS PROGRAMS 
Director of Nontraditional Learning 
921-5626 

GENERAL ACADEMIC AND 

FACULTY MATTERS 

ice President and Dean of Faculty 
^27-5261 

GIFTS. GRANTS & BEQUESTS 
Office of College Advancement 
927-5263 

GRADUATE STUDY 
Associate Graduate Dean 
927-5377 



HOU 1 

or of Hou 
927 5269 

OFFICE OF MINORITY AFFAIRS 
Director of Minority Recruitment 
927 5252 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Office of College Advancement 

927-5263 

SECURITY 
Campus Police 
927-5236 

TEACHER CERTIFICATION 
Certification Officer 
927-5294 

TESTING 

Division of Student Affairs 

927-5269 

TRANSCRIPTS 
Office of the Registrar 
927-5275 

TUITION. PAYMENT OF BILLS. REFUNDS 
Vice President for Business & Finance 
927-5255 



Special Notice 

The statements set forth in this Catalog are for 
information purposes only and should not be 
construed as the basis of a contract between a 
student and this institution. 

While the provisions of the Catalog will generally 
be applied as stated. Armstrong State College 
reserves the right to change any provision listed 
in this Catalog, including but not limited to aca- 
demic requirements for graduation, without actual 
notice to individual students. Every effort will be 
made to keep students advised of any such 
changes. Information on changes will be avail- 
able in the Offices of the Registrar, the Vice 
President of Student Affairs, and the academic 
deans. It is especially important that students 
note that it is their responsibility to keep them- 
selves apprised of current graduation 
requirements for their particular degree pro- 
gram. 

Armstrong State College is an affirmative action 
equal opportunity education institution and does 
not discriminate on the basis of sex. race. age. 
religion, disability, or national origin in employ- 
ment, admissions, or activities. 



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